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NavSource Online: Battleship Photo Archive

BB-36 USS NEVADA
1927 - 1941

Radio Call Sign: November - Alpha - Delta - Kilo

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1912 - 1919
1920 - 1926
Pearl Harbor Attack - 1942
1943 - 1945
Post War - 1948 Sinking
1949 - Present


Nevada Class Battleship: Displacement 27,500 Tons, Dimensions, 583' (oa) x 95' 3" x 29' 7" (Max). Armament 10 x 14"/45 21 x 5"/51, 2 x 21" tt. Armor, 13 1/2" Belt, 18" Triple Turrets, 16" Dual turrets, 3" Second (armor) Deck, 2 1/2" Third (splinter) Deck 16" Conning Tower. Machinery, 26,500 SHP; Geared Turbines, 2 screws. Speed, 20.5 Knots, Crew 864.

Operational and Building Data: Laid down by Fore River, Shipbuilding, Quincy, MA., November 4, 1912. Launched July 11, 1914. Commissioned March 11, 1916. Decommissioned August 29, 1946. Stricken August 12, 1948.
Fate: Target During Atomic Bomb Tests, Bikini Atoll, Marshall Islands. Sunk, off Oahu, July 31 1948, by Gunfire from Iowa BB-61 and 3 Heavy Cruisers.
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Battlefleet122kWatercolor of a Presidential review during President Hoover's term of office, 1928-32.
Crews line the rails of a Colorado class (BB-45-48) battleship as the ships pass in line astern of the reviewing stand with the airship Los Angeles (ZR-3) piercing the clouds accompanied by 9 biplanes.
Courtesy of Michael Schwarz.
Battlefleet56kView of the U.S. Battlefleet from above, possibly from the airship Los Angeles (ZR-3). Photo courtesy of periscopefilm.com.
BB-36 Nevada350kNevada (BB-36) being modernized at Norfolk Naval Shipyard between 4 May 1929 and January 1930.
The date has to be from this period of time because the Arizona (BB-39) entered Norfolk on 4 May 1929 to prepare for modernization.
Placed in reduced commission on 15 July 1929, Arizona remained in yard hands for the next 20 months; tripod masts, surmounted by three-tiered fire control tops, replaced the old cage masts; 5-inch, 25-caliber antiaircraft guns replaced the 3-inch 50s with which she had been equipped. She also received additional armor to protect her vitals from the fall of shot and blisters to protect her from torpedo or near-miss damage from bombs. In addition, she received new boilers as well as new main and cruising turbines. Ultimately, she was placed in full commission on 1 March 1931.
The Auxiliary to the left of the Arizona is 1 of 8 Patoka class fleet oilers, most likely either Sapelo (AO-11) or Salinas (AO-19).
US Navy Photograph courtesy of Ric Hedman. Partial text courtesy of DANFS. Photo i.d. contributed by Chris Hoehn, Jeff J., Chuck Haberlein & Mike Green.
BB-36 Nevada219kThe Nevada (BB-36) transiting the Panama Canal, sometime following her modernization after 1930 and her transfer to the Pacific Fleet. Nevada served in the Pacific Fleet for the next decade. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri. Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-36 Nevada188kThe Nevada (BB-36) at a California port sometime after 1930.
Following the 1925 refit the New York class battleships profile sported the standard tiered fire control tower atop a tripod mast almost identical to that of the Nevada. Further aft would be the now single funnel followed by the shortened after fire control tower sitting atop the O1 deck and below the top of the funnel. The Main mast is still a tripod and is located between the No. 3 and No. 4 turrets. And lastly the New York class were flush decked vessels.
The vessel in the background of the photo clearly sports two widely spaced funnels, the after one is issuing a plume of smoke and has a pole mast for its main mast which if it were situated on a New York class would stand somewhere in the vicinity of the No. 4 Turret. And despite the water spot a close examination of the bow will show what looks like a clipper bow. The bow and the pronounced step of the weather deck aft of the forward funnel suggest that this is an American heavy cruiser probably of the Portland class.
USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri. Photo i.d. by Chris Hoehn, Jeff J. & Chuck Haberlein.
BB-36 Nevada 58k Excellent circa 1930's image showing details, Long Beach Ca.
This photo was originally thought to be the Oklahoma (BB-37), but was subsequently identified as the Nevada (BB-36) because of the number of platforms on the forward mast under the control top; (prior to receiving the cloverleaf platforms the Oklahoma only had one platform, Nevada had two). Also, the shape of the boat cranes across the top is a clear indicator of which ship you are looking at.
The Nevada crane main beam was straight across from the post with a supporting arm angling up to the main beam. The Oklahoma main beam had the supporting brace connecting from the top of the post to the main beam.
Photo courtesy of Paul Ayers & copy The Inman Co. Long Beach CA.
Photo & text I.d. courtesy of Jeff J., Chuck Haberlein & Mike Green.
BB-36 Nevada260k Nevada (BB-36) steaming in line, guns trained out to port. Directly behind her are the Wyoming (BB-32) & Idaho (BB-42). Date approximatley 1930.USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-36 Nevada148kOil on canvas painting by the artist James Flood entitled " Nevada (BB-36) - 1930's", depicts the battleship plowing through the waves during the 1930's after her rebuild.Photo and partial text courtesy of oldgloryprints.com
BB-36 Nevada254k1930's circa photo by George Winstead of the Nevada (BB-36) anchored at a Pacific port sometime after 1930. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-36 Nevada128kThe Nevada (BB-36) underway minus her search planes, possibly off the coast of San Francisco sometime after 1930. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-34 New York94k New York (BB-34) leading Nevada (BB-36) and Oklahoma (BB-37) during maneuvers, 1932. The carrier Langley (CV-1) is partially visible in the distance.USNHC # NH 48138 from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.
BB-36 Nevada58kCaptain Pye was Commanding Officer of the battleship Nevada (BB-36) in 1932-33. Photographed in Special Full Dress uniform by the Ernst Studio, circa 1936. His medals include (from left to right): Navy Cross; Spanish Campaign Medal, 1898; and World War I Victory Medal. USNHC photo # NH 47254 courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
BB-36 Nevada213kThe ship at Puget Sound Navy Yard in September, 1934. Good detail shot of the ship as she was rebuilt under the Washington Treaty. Note the antiaircraft range-finders on the foremast platform above her bridge. The director proper was located one level down, at the rear end of the range-finder platform. It's front end carried the 20-foot armored range-finder (for the secondary battery) atop her pilot house. As in the "Big Five", the three level masthead tops carried, from top to bottom, a main battery director (Mark 20), a platform for main battery control and spotting, and a platform for two secondary battery directors.

The lower mast platform carried the 12-foot range finder for the secondary battery. Just visible under the foremast itself is the diamond shaped loop of the radio direction-finder. The large oval openings just below the flack rack, which were characteristic of this class, were air intakes leading into ducts installed as part of the modernization. The port duct is visible as a square structure just below the signal searchlight forward of the flag rack. In the rear view looking forward, note the searchlight platforms on the funnel, which were characteristic of many of the rebuilt battleships, with their controls below them.
USN photo. Text courtesy of the U.S. Navy via Don Montgomery and U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
BB-36 Nevada216kThe ship at Puget Sound Navy Yard in September, 1934. Good detail shot of the ship as she was rebuilt under the Washington Treaty. Note the antiaircraft range-finders on the foremast platform above her bridge. The director proper was located one level down, at the rear end of the range-finder platform. It's front end carried the 20-foot armored range-finder (for the secondary battery) atop her pilot house. As in the "Big Five", the three level masthead tops carried, from top to bottom, a main battery director (Mark 20), a platform for main battery control and spotting, and a platform for two secondary battery directors.

The lower mast platform carried the 12-foot range finder for the secondary battery. Just visible under the foremast itself is the diamond shaped loop of the radio direction-finder. The large oval openings just below the flack rack, which were characteristic of this class, were air intakes leading into ducts installed as part of the modernization. The port duct is visible as a square structure just below the signal searchlight forward of the flag rack. In the rear view looking forward, note the searchlight platforms on the funnel, which were characteristic of many of the rebuilt battleships, with their controls below them.
USN photo. Text courtesy of the U.S. Navy via Don Montgomery and U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
BB-36 Nevada111kIn Dry Dock Number 1 at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard, Hawaii, circa 1935. Note men painting her boot topping from stages rigged over the side, and outline of her anti-torpedo "blister" where it merges with her forward hull.USNHC # NH 50102 from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.
BB-36 Nevada51kLieutenant Commander Ghormley spent most of World War I aboard the battleship Nevada (BB-36) as a flag aide. He returned as the Commanding Officer of Nevada in 1935 as Captain and a year later in 1936 returned to the U.S. Fleet staff. In the rank of Vice Admiral, he served as Commander South Pacific Area and South Pacific Force in June-October 1942, during the critical early stages of the campaign to seize and hold Guadalcanal and Tulagi. Photographed in October 1935, while he was Commanding Officer of Nevada. USNHC photo # NH 49309 & submitted by Bill Gonyo.
Battleship Row1.8mVery large (1.8m.b) 1936 photo of Battleship Row, Pearl Harbor. Among the ships in the harbor are:
On the far left are two New Orleans (CA-32) class heavy cruisers. Neither ship can be positively identified, but I believe the outer one (the one furthest from the camera) to be either New Orleans (CA-32), Quincy (CA-39), or Vincennes (CA-44).
The battleships from left to right: Colorado (BB-45), or West Virginia (BB-48), outboard of Idaho (BB-42), Nevada (BB-36), outboard of Mississippi (BB-41), New Mexico (BB-40), outboard of Maryland (BB-46) or California (BB-44).
On the far right is the Hospital ship Relief (AH-1) with two unidentified ships ahead and to her port side.
Text courtesy of David Johnston, (USNR) & Aryeh Wetherhorn (USNR). Photo courtesy of Edward Cwalinski, submitted by Barry Litchfield.
BB-36 Nevada85k6 April 1937 photo of the ship as rebuilt on gunnery trials. Four 0.50 caliber machine guns are mounted in the main mast "bird bath" and more are mounted on both masts platforms. USN photo.
BB-36 Nevada94kOperating at sea, during the later 1930s, with her 14"/45 main battery guns trained on her port bow.Official U.S. Navy Photograph, USNHC # NH 97395, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-36 Nevada102kNevada (BB-36) during the later 1930s.Official USN photo courtesy of Derek Strahan.
BB-39 Arizona43k Arizona (BB-39) leading Nevada (BB-36) and the Tennessee (BB-43) and a New Mexico class battleship underway. USN photo from the Atlas Editions. Submitted by Eric W. Dahlstrom.
BB-36 Nevada151kUnident. American warships off the coast of Hawaii during the US Navy's Pacific fleet maneuvers.
I believe it's Nevada (BB-36). Here's how I arrived at that. Note the notched stern. I believe that only Nevada and sister Oklahoma (BB-37) had that feature.
My primary interest is in naval aviation, and the aircraft markings are important. Having this photo in color facilitates the identification. The red tails on the Curtiss SOC biplanes indicate that these are from VO-1 (Observation [Squadron] One), and therefore the ship is from Battleship Division One. (The aircraft's squadron number corresponds to the ship's division number.) BatDivOne consisted of Arizona (BB-39), Nevada and Pennsylvania (BB-38) (in that order, which is important.)
The next bit of information comes from the color of the aircraft cowls. The two turret-mounted aircraft have covers on their cowls (and canopies), but the stern-mounted aircraft is uncovered and shows a white cowl, making it from the second section. The aircraft's section corresponds to the ship's position in the division. As noted above, the second ship in BatDivOne is Nevada .
Oklahoma was in BatDivTwo: her aircraft would have had white tails.
If you have the close up color photos of the SOC on the Idaho (BB-42) you can apply the same rules (although it's a much simpler identification since you can read the ship's name on the fuselage). The blue tail signifies VO-3. The red cowl is the first section. Idaho was the flagship of BatDivThree.
If you want to be precise, the aircraft on the the Idaho turret is an SON-1, a Naval Aircraft Factory-built version of the SOC.
Photographer: Carl Mydans, courtesy of time.com. via / images.google.com & Life. Text courtesy of Alan Moore. Photo added 11/24/08.
BB-40 New Mexico & family242kBetween 9 & 13 Sep 1940 the Arizona (BB-39) was under way with other ships of the US Fleet for simulated fleet engagement.
Pictured here is a New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class battleship in the van with other battleships of the Pacific Fleet and a carrier air group, led by the Air Group Commander in a Curtiss SBC Helldiver.
The aircraft following are:
A torpedo squadron of eighteen Douglas TBD-1s;
A bombing squadron of eighteen Northrop BT-1s;
A scouting squadron eighteen Curtiss SBCs;
A fighting squadron of eighteen Grumman F2F-1s or F3F-3s from either the Yorktown (CV-5) or F3F-2s from the Enterprise (CV-6), plus possibly nine additional aircraft.
The Yorktown and Enterprise were the only two carriers whose bombing squadrons were equipped with the Northrop BT-1.
The text for the photo reads:
"The Navy uses enormous amounts of rubber. At least seventy-five tons of rubber, enough to makes 17,000 tires, are used in the construction of each of these battleships. Tons more are needed for the naval planes that are making history over the world. Medical and communication requirements--and countless other needs of the Navy--are met."
Photograph # LC-USE64 - DC-000944 & partial text courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Aircraft i.d. & text & timeline courtesy of Alan Moore via the following sources: Airplane i.d.: Yorktown Class Carriers (Warship Pictorial No. 9) by Steve Wiper, Tucson, AZ: Classic Warships Publishing, 2000. & That Gallant Ship: U.S.S. Yorktown (CV-5) by Robert Cressman, Missoula, MT: Pictorial Histories Pub Co, 1985. Timeline from Battleship Arizona: An Illustrated History by Paul Stillwell, Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1991.
BB-39 Arizona534kBetween 9 & 13 Sep 1940 the Arizona (BB-39) was under way with other ships of the US Fleet for simulated fleet engagement. She is pictured here in company with other ships of the Pacific Fleet taken during Fleet Ops. and at least one carrier air group.Scanned from: "The Fleet Today" by Kendall Banning. Funk & Wagnalls Company, N.Y. and London, 1942. Submitted by Pieter Bakels. Text & photo i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore via Battleship Arizona: An Illustrated History by Paul Stillwell, Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1991.
Submarine Base,Pearl Harbor 144k Aerial view of the Submarine Base,Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii, with part of the supply depot beyond and the fuel farm at right, looking north on 13 October 1941. Note the fuel tank across the road from the submarine base, painted to resemble a building. The building beside the submarine ascent tower (in left center, shaped like an upsidedown "U") housed the U.S. Fleet Headquarters at the time of the Japanese attack on 7 December 1941. Office of Admiral Husband E. Kimmel, the Fleet's Commander in Chief, was in the upper left corner of the building's top floor.
Wharton (AP-7) is in right foreground. Among the submarines at the base are Tuna (SS-203), Gudgeon (SS-211), Argonaut (SS-166), Narwhal (SS-167), Triton (SS-201) and Dolphin (SS-169). Holland (AS-3) and Niagara (PG-52) are alongside the wharf on the base's north side. In the distance (nearest group in upper left) are the battleship Nevada (BB-36), at far left, Castor (AKS-1) and the derelict old minelayer Baltimore. Cruisers in top center are Minneapolis (CA-36), closest to camera, and Pensacola (CA-24), wearing a Measure 5 painted "bow wave".
Official U.S. Navy Photograph # 80-G-451125, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Additional Nevada Images
1 General View Of Nevada From The Library Of Congress Server.

USS NEVADA BB-36 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry
(Located On The Hazegray & Underway Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)

Crew Contact And Reunion Information

Contact Name: Position open
Address: 153 Cecil Avenue, PO Box 216, Owingsville, KY,40360
Phone: 606-674-2125
E-mail: Kevin Stewart


Note About Contacts.

The contact listed, Was the contact at the time for this ship when located. If another person now is the contact, E-mail me and I will update this entry. These contacts are compiled from various sources over a long period of time and may or may not be correct. Every effort has been made to list the newest contact if more than one contact was found.


Additional Resources
Hazegray & Underway Battleship Pages By Andrew Toppan.
HyperWar Pacific Theater of Operations.

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