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NavSource Online: Aircraft Carrier Photo Archive


Contributed by Mike Smolinski

USS HORNET   (CV-12)
(later CVA-12 and CVS-12)


Flag Hoist/Radio Call Sign: November - Bravo - Golf - Charlie
Tactical Voice Radio Call: "JUNO"


CLASS - ESSEX (Short Hull)
Displacement 27,100 Tons, Dimensions, 872' (oa) x 93' x 28' 7" (Max)
Armament 12 x 5"/38AA, 32 x 40mm, 46 x 20mm, 82 Aircraft.
Armor, 4" Belt, 2 1/2" Hanger deck, 1 1/2" Deck, 1 1/2" Conning Tower.
Machinery, 150,000 SHP; Westinghouse Geared Turbines, 4 screws
Speed, 33 Knots, Crew 3448.


Operational and Building Data

Built by Newport News. Initially named Kearsarge; renamed to honor CV-8. Laid down 3 August 1942, launched 30 August 1943, commissioned 29 November 1943. Decommissioned to reserve 15 January 1947.

Briefly recommissioned in 1951, then underwent an SCB-27A modernization at the New York Naval Shipyard. Redesignated as an "attack carrier" (CVA-12) on 1 October 1952. Recommissioned on 11 September 1953. Modernized again (SCB-125) in 1956, at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard. In mid-1958, Hornet was converted to an antisubmarine warfare support carrier in the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, and redesignated CVS-12.

Fate: Decommissioned for the last time on 26 June 1970. Struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 25 July 1989 and sold for breaking up. However, she was saved by the efforts of historically-minded citizens and donated to the Aircraft Carrier Hornet Foundation for use as a museum on 26 May 1998; she is currently at Pier 3, Alameda Point, Alameda, Ca. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, ref. no. 91002065, and designated a National Historic Landmark, 4 December 1991.


Click On Image 
For Full Size Image
Size Image Description Contributed
By And/Or Copyright
The Early Years — World War II
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212aj
535k

USS Hornet (CV-12), World War II.

Overhead plan and starboard profile meticulously drawn by John Robert Barrett. Available from Navy Yard Associates (if you decide to purchase artwork from them please indicate that you heard about their work from NavSource).

Navy Yard Associates
CV-12 Hornet
NS021237a
96k

Secretary of the Navy Frank Knox and his wife, Mrs. Annie Reid Knox, ship's sponsor, at Hornet's christening ceremonies, 30 August 1943. The carrier was built at the Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Company shipyard, Newport News, Virginia.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph (# NH 53429).

NHC
CV-12 Hornet
NS021237b
158k

Bow view of launching of the future USS Hornet (CV-12), showing original bow configuration, 30 August 1943.

National Archives photo (# 80-G-43009).

The Library of Congress, via Mike Green
CV-12 Hornet
NS021237
119k

Launching, 30 August 1943, at Newport News on the James River.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212ap
255k

Port quarter view of USS Hornet (CV-12) as completed. Norfolk Navy Yard, 19 December 1943.

US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 1996.488.245.003.

Mike Green
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212apa
228k

Overhead bow view of USS Hornet (CV-12) underway on 19 December 1943, leaving Norfolk Navy Yard, beginning her shakedown period.

US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 1996.488.245.006.

Mike Green
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212apb
201k

Port bow view of USS Hornet (CV-12) off Norfolk Navy Yard, 19 December 1943. Norfolk Navy Yard photo serial 6724(43).

She is, as commissioned, in Measure 33, Design 3A camouflage scheme.

US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 1996.488.245.004.

Mike Green
CV-12 Hornet
NS021201
16k

Small overhead as built. Appears to have been taken on the same occasion as the photos above.

USN
CV-12 Hornet
NS021204
112k USS Hornet (CV-12). Pristine when they left the shipyards, the carriers looked rag torn and dirty after a few months of wartime flight operations. The dazzle camouflage didn't help their clean line appearance. USN
CV-12 Hornet
NS021225
110k

Unusual view of Hornet's flight deck.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021225a
86k
CV-12 Hornet
NS021222
127k

Stern view just before her shakedown cruise, Dec. 1943. (National Archives photo).

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212am
121k

Full aerial view of USS Hornet (CV-12) off Norfolk, Va., showing original stern configuration and axial flight deck, 19 December 1943.

National Archives photo (# 80-G-206000).

Mike Green
CV-12 Hornet
NS021235
124k

View of the island of USS Hornet (CV-12), late 1943–early 1944. Note the SM radar antenna (the "dish" fitted at the fore end of the mast platform). Hornet was the first ship of her class to receive this fighter-control radar.

Pieter Bakels
CV-12 Hornet
NS021272
73k

USS Hornet (CV-12) underway in January 1944 during her shakedown in the Atlantic, before Air Group 15 came aboard. She is wearing Measure 33, Design 3A camouflage. There are only four radio masts on the starboard side of the flight deck, and the hangar catapult outrigger is in the stowed position. In place of a third Mk 37 director, a 40-mm quad mount was fitted at the same level as the flight deck. Note the hull number on the flight deck is unusually painted facing "the other" way — this was corrected before she entered combat.

(Thanks to Steve Whitby, who provided additional information.)

Robert Hurst
CV-12 Hornet
NS021231a
134k

The Atlantic Ocean, January 1944. Training accidents during a ship and airgroup shakedown and workup were not infrequent. This Helldiver from VB-15 (# 15-B-25) had its tail chewed off by another SB2C (see below).

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021231
141k

The Atlantic Ocean, January 1944. This Helldiver chewed off the tail of another Helldiver (# 15-B-25, see above). Crews in both aircraft were hurt; note crewman carrying a stretcher. National Archives photo.

Steve Whitby

Larger photo submitted by Pieter Bakels
CV-12 Hornet
NS021236
113k

This photo was taken on March 4, 1944 as Hornet was tying up to the mooring at Fox 9 Ford Island, Pearl Harbor with Air Group 15 on the flight deck. The photo was taken from Essex (CV-9) who would soon be taking Air Group 15 aboard while Hornet would take Air Group 2 into her first combat with the Japanese.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212au
368k

"This series of photographs was taken on USS Hornet (CV-12) during a 'Crossing The Line' ceremony (either the Equator or the International Date Line, or possibly both) in 1944. The photographs were taken by Photographer's Mate 2/Class Paul D. Guttman. He happened to be on board the Hornet when she crossed both the Equator and the International Date Line, and there were separate initiation ceremonies for both occasions, so it is possible these pictures may have been taken on two separate occasions." Hornet crossed the Equator for the first time on 25 March 1944.

Robert Guttman
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212aua
272k
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212aub
332k
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212auc
243k
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212aud
258k
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212aue
253k
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212auf
285k
CV-12 Hornet
NS021264
152k

A close-up of Hornet's hangar deck catapult with Air Group 2 on the flight deck; 1944.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212aa
165k

VF-2 pilots manning their F6F-3 Hellcats for a raid against Truk, May 1944.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021232
105k

Good bow shot of Hornet in original form tied up at Majuro, May 29, 1944. National Archives photo # 80-G-242616.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021273
80k

USS Hornet (CV-12) recovering an SB2C Helldiver from VB-2, June 1944.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021291
128k

"ENS F. T. Long from Torpedo 2 [VT-2] wrote off TBM-1C BuNo 45593" in June 1944. Both photos appear to have been taken within seconds from each other.

(NS021291): It looks like the landing gear collapsed, perhaps because the hydraulics of #93 had been shot out. This picture shows to good advantage the "Net" that the LSO dove into if there was a problem.

(NS021291a): Apparently #93, its engine and starboard wing ripped off, had already been hit some time earlier, as attested by the still unpainted fabric patch on its rudder.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021291a
105k Steve Whitby

Larger photo submitted by Pieter Bakels
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212at
112k

A starboard side view of USS Hornet (CV-12), with Air Group (CVG) 2 aboard, July 1944. Her dazzle pattern (Measure 33, Design 3A) was still in good shape then.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212ay
13k

A Curtiss SB2C Helldiver that failed to catch the wire on landing and hit the first barrier, nose-diving into the deck, breaking the engine mounts, rupturing fuel lines and starting a fire. It was quickly extinguished and cleared out of the way so that further aircraft could continue to land. USS Hornet, 3 July 1944. Photo from daveswarbirds.com.

Robert Hurst
CV-12 Hornet
NS021248
108k

VT-2 Avengers returning to Hornet from a mission, August 1944. National Archives.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021233
162k

Hornet's flight deck and island taken while at anchor in Eniwetok Atoll, August 26, 1944. This was a ceremony in which Admiral Mitscher, Commander of TF-58, honored the ship, crew, and Air Group 2 for their part in the conquest of the Marianas Islands. The ship anchored off Hornet's starboard side is USS Essex (CV-9). The light carrier is believed to be USS San Jacinto (CVL-30). National Archives photo.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021226
246k

The second Fighting Two squadron (VF-2), "Rippers," later "Tall Dogs," was established on 1 June 1943. It made two combat deployments, one aboard USS Enterprise (CV-6), November 1943–January 1944, and one aboard USS Hornet (CV-12), March–September 1944. Its first commanding officer, and leading ace, was Commander William A. Dean. VF-2 was disestablished on 9 November 1945.

David LaMar Berrey was a pilot between 1943–1944. His brother, Boyd Berrey, also served on the Hornet and trained with "Pappy" Boyington in 1941.

Joan Rands, daughter of David LaMar Berrey
CV-12 Hornet
NS021226b
52k Tommy Trampp
CV-12 Hornet
NS021226a
120k

"Jocko Jima" certificate awarded to flight crew of Air Group 2 by ADM Joseph J. "Jocko" Clark.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212az
158k

CVG-11 preparing to launch a strike in late 1944. Nine Grumman F6F-5 Hellcats (most armed with HVARS) are turning up ahead of eight Grumman TBM-3 Avengers and nine Curtiss SB2C-3 Helldivers. Aside from the white ball on the vertical stabiliser, Hornet Hellcats and Avengers sported white propeller hubs to enhance recognition in flight. Photo courtesy of the Tailhook Association.

Photo and text from VF-11/111 "Sundowners" 1942–95 (Aviation Elite Units #36), by Barrett Tillman.

Robert Hurst
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212ae
194k

Overhead view of an ammo ship replenishing USS Hornet (CV-12), October 1944. Note the forward antenna masts half way up.

Steve Whitby
CV-16 Lexington
NS021666
213k

"A message from the first Commanding Officer of the first modern Hornet," VADM Marc A. Mitscher, Commander First Carrier Task Force, "to the Officers and Men of Task Force Thirty-Eight." Ulithi Atoll, 30 October 1944. Mitscher's flagship at the time was USS Lexington (CV-16).

Quoted for the information of all hands aboard the second modern Hornet (CV-12).

Robert M. Cieri
CV-12 Hornet
NS021265
134k

A VF-11 F6F getting a wave off while another Hellcat taxies out of the way, Dec. 1944.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021274
163k

The famous "Murderers Row" at Ulithi lagoon, December 1944, as seen from USS Wasp (CV-18): USS Yorktown (CV-10), USS Hornet (CV-12), and USS Hancock (CV-19).

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021214
111k

Curtiss SB2C-3 Helldiver aircraft bank over the carrier before landing, following strikes on Japanese shipping in the China Sea, circa mid-January 1945. Photographed by Lieutenant Commander Charles Kerlee, USNR.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-469319).

Scott Dyben
CV-12 Hornet
NS021275
153k

A mix of Hellcats. Flat windscreen F6F-5's and round windscreen -3's from VF-11, late January 1945, launching for strikes against Formosa.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021238
139k

Hornet and Independence (CVL-22) together, Jan. 25, 1945, as seen from Enterprise (CV-6).

National Naval Aviation Museum, photo # 1996.488.245.010. Robert L. Lawson Photograph Collection.

Steve Whitby
Larger copy submitted by Mike Green
CV-12 Hornet
NS021234
112k

Bombs being transferred to Hornet from ammo ship off Iwo Jima, February 1945. Note one of VF-11's F6F's with geometric white squares on the tail denoting CV-12, parked on the forward flight deck and the heavy weathering and rust on the original dazzle paint on her forward hull. The USS Hornet was the first Essex-class carrier to be painted in dazzled paint (November 29, 1943) and one of the last to have it painted out (July 1945). National Archives photo.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021242
105k

40mm Quad Machine Gun Mount firing on board USS Hornet (CV-12), circa February 1945, probably during gunnery practice. The original picture caption identifies the photo as having been taken during Task Force 58's raid on Japan, 16 February 1945. However, helmetless members of the gun crew, and rolled up shirt sleeves, strongly indicate that the occasion was in warmer climes and not while in combat. View looks aft on the port side, with the carrier's port quarter 5"/38 guns just beyond the 40mm mount. Note ready-service ammunition and spent shell casings at right; men passing 4-round clips to loaders at left.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-413915).

Pieter Bakels
DD-556 + CV-12 + CV-6
NS0555607
130k

As seen from USS Essex (CV-9), destroyer USS Hailey (DD-556) refuels from an unidentified ship, with USS Hornet (CV-12) in the middle distance (painted in camouflage Measure 33, design 3A) and USS Enterprise (CV-6) in the background. Location and date unknown (probably sometime in February–May 1945).

Pieter Bakels
CV-12 Hornet
NS021266
126k

Hornet, showing heavy weathering and rust after more than a year of sustained combat and salt water, anchored at Ulithi on March 6, 1945 with Air Group 17 on deck. LCI(L)-1052 is in the foreground.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021276
164k

One of VB-17's SB2C Helldivers taxiing out for launch, March 1945.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021223
136k

Hornet recovering and Bennington (CV-20) launching aircraft off the coast of Japan, March 1945. (National Archives photo).

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021249
153k

March 1945, with Air Group 17 on the flight deck. National Archives.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212ab
189k

Another aerial view of USS Hornet (CV-12) during operations off Okinawa, in March 1945, with Air Group 17 aboard.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212ax
227k

Another aerial view of USS Hornet (CV-12) underway, that might have been taken at the same time as the photos above (NS021249 & NS0212ab).

Wolfgang Hechler
CV-12 Hornet
NS021215
87k

USS Hornet (CV-12) operating near Okinawa, 27 March 1945. The ship is painted in camouflage Measure 33, Design 3a.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-K-14466).

Scott Dyben
CV-12 Hornet
NS021224
59k

Hornet under attack as seen from Bennington (CV-20), April 1945. Photo by Lowell Love.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021297
87k

USS Hornet (CV-12), along with USS Bennington (CV-20), shooting down a kamikaze off Okinawa, April 1945.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021267
169k

A grainy shot of Hornet's TBM Avengers and SB2C Helldivers from Air Group 17 preparing for launch, April 1945.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021285
77k

Unique shot of a VF-17 Hellcat being lowered down Hornet's deck edge elevator showing her geometric tail and wingtip design, April 1945.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021286
51k

TBM-3 Avengers from VT-17 attacking targets around Tokyo, possibly in April 1945.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212av
252k

"A Kamikaze just misses USS Hornet. This picture was taken on the USS Hornet (CV-12) off Okinawa during April 1945 by Photographer’s Mate 2/c Paul D. Guttman, and it was definitely not taken with a telephoto lens! The black specks visible in the midst of the blast aren't flaws in the film, they're bits of shrapnel from the exploding plane. Paul was knocked unconscious by the blast, and came to later, in sick bay. He wasn't even aware that he'd taken this picture until sometime later, after the film was developed!"

"The other carrier visible in the background, wreathed in smoke from the firing of her own AA guns, is supposedly USS Intrepid (CV-11) [(?)]."

Robert Guttman
CV-12 Hornet
NS021277
178k

Sixteen F6F Hellcats from VF-17 running up their Pratt & Whitney R-2800's on April 6, 1945 to attack the Japanese battleship Yamato and her escorts.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212aw
160k

VF-17 F6F Hellcats launching for a strike on Okinawa, May 1945.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021216
77k

View looking aft from the ship's island as she steams with other carriers during a western Pacific gunnery practice session, circa June 1945. Next ship astern is USS Bon Homme Richard (CV-31), firing her 5"/38 battery to starboard. Two small aircraft carriers (CVL) are beyond her. Note yellow flight deck markings on Hornet and TBM and SB2C aircraft parked aft.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-K-5702).

Scott Dyben
CV-12 Hornet
NS021252
110k

Photo taken from the bridge on the morning of June 5th, 1945 just as the first 24 feet of the flight deck get smashed to splinters by the typhoon. The forward antenna mast has left the ship!. National Archives.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021292
88k

A VT-17 TBM-3E Avenger on top of a VF-17 F6F-5 Hellcat, June 6, 1945 the day after the typhoon.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021203
103k

Shown here after weathering a typhoon on June 4–5, 1945. She continued on despite the damage and when it was too dangerous to launch over the bow, she backed into the wind until there was enough wind across the deck to safely launch planes. Compare these photos to those of Wasp (CV-18) and Bennington (CV-20).

Tracy White, Researcher @ Large

See additional photos and read "Flight deck structural failure and collapse during June 1945 Typhoon" at the Researcher @ Large website.

Larger copy submitted by Steve Whitby.
CV-12 Hornet
NS021203a
80k

This photo, showing damage from the typhoon of 4–5 June 1945, was taken probably from USS Blue Ridge (AGC-2) sometime during the period 29 June 1945 to 2 July 1945 at Pearl Harbor when USS Hornet (CV-12) stopped on her way from the Philippines to Hunters Point Naval Shipyard, San Francisco. Blue Ridge was at Pearl for repairs and overhaul for the period from 28 June 1945 to 8 September 1945.

Michael Patrick in honor of his father John J. Patrick RT 3/c, USS Blue Ridge (AGC-2), 1943–1945.
Date confirmation via deck logs by John Chiquoine.
CV-12 Hornet
NS021268
47k

View of port section of flight deck forward.

Tracy White, Researcher @ Large

See additional photos and read "Flight deck structural failure and collapse during June 1945 Typhoon" at the Researcher @ Large website.
CV-12 Hornet
NS021268a
56k

View of port section of flight deck where folded, taken from forecastle deck looking forward. This section contains the Forward Emergency Radio Room, Motor Generator Room and one gasoline filling station.

CV-12 Hornet
NS021270
30k

View of bottom flange of bent at Frame 8, showing twist.

CV-12 Hornet
NS021271
61k

View of under starboard side of extreme forward flight deck, where collapsed. Taken from centerline.

CV-12 Hornet
NS0212ar
189k

"Commendation of Flagship," USS Hornet (CV-12), from Commander Carrier Division Five, RADM Joseph J. "Jocko" Clark. Although no date is visible, it must have been issued during the first half of June 1945.

Robert M. Cieri
CV-12 Hornet
NS021250
173k

Shot of the damaged bow from the June 1945 typhoon being repaired at Hunters Point, San Francisco, July 1945. National Archives.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021269
198k

Hornet tied up at Hunters Point, San Francisco, shortly after her complete refit and bow repair from the June 5th typhoon, September 1945. The war was over by then.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021298
203k

USS Hornet's scoreboard, on display at the National Naval Aviation Museum, Pensacola, Florida. Photo taken on 13 June 2008.

Photo by Judson Phillips
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212ak
202k

Presidential Unit Citation presented to USS Hornet (CV-12) and her attached Air Groups, March 29, 1944, to June 10, 1945.

Steve Whitby
CV-3, CV-6, CV-12 and CVL-30
NS020632
116k

Naval Air Station, Alameda, California — Four aircraft carriers docked at the Air Station's piers, circa mid-September 1945. The ships are (from front to back): USS Saratoga (CV-3), USS Enterprise (CV-6), USS Hornet (CV-12) and USS San Jacinto (CVL-30). Note PBY amphibians parked at the far left.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-701512).

Note that four, out of five, classes of fast Aircraft Carriers that fought in the Pacific (only the one-ship class Wasp is missing) are represented in this photograph.

NHC
CV-12 Hornet
NS021278
90k

USS Hornet (CV-12) returning to San Francisco from her fifth trip to the Pacific bringing troops back home on January 28, 1946. She's wearing a weathered Measure 22 paint scheme, along with the 40-mm guns added during her July-August refit and flight deck repair. She has F8F Bearcats on deck. Only the two forward flight deck radio masts remain.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021260
88k

Drydock, Hunters Point, March 1946. It looks like right after sandblasting the hull. Note the little tugboat that pulled Hornet in. Looks like the tugboat was sandblasted too. Photo by RM2C Robert Whitby.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021227
76k

Drydock, Hunters Point, March 1946. Photo by RM2C Robert Whitby.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021228
69k

Drydock, Hunters Point, March 1946. Photo by RM2C Robert Whitby.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021229
70k

Drydock, Hunters Point, March 1946. Photo by RM2C Robert Whitby.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021256
87k

Hornet at Alameda, early 1946. One of the earliest photos of the ship's hull number painted on the funnel.

Vito Vaccaro via Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021259
90k

USS Hornet at Alameda, Calif., circa early 1946.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021293
129k

Hornet at Hunters Point, San Francisco on June 20th, 1947 in the "Mothball Reserve Fleet". Intrepid's bow is at the upper left.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212af
119k

Post-war view of Hornet in "mothballs." View looking forward, with the forward elevator well in the distance.

Pieter Bakels
CV-12 Hornet
NS0212afa
140k

Post-war view of Hornet in "mothballs." Forward elevator well.

World War II Crew
CV-12 Hornet
NS021254
134k

K-Division, Radio Communications crew, September 1944.

Vito Vaccaro via Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021251
77k

RM2C Robert Whitby (left) and Vito Vaccaro in front of the ship's Grumman Duck, circa early 1946.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021255
91k

RM2C Robert Whitby (left) and some of his friends on one of the 20-mm Oerlikon machine guns on the starboard catwalk, early 1946.

Vito Vaccaro via Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021258
116k

RM2C Robert Whitby and his fellow radiomen, Alameda, circa early 1946.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021258a
119k

RM2C Robert Whitby (left) and his friend Vito Vaccaro on the flight deck of USS Hornet (CV-12), probably at Alameda, circa March 1946.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021258b
93k

Liberty Card, RM3/c Robert L. Whitby, K-1 Division.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021258c
162k

Plank Owner's Certificate, RM2/c Robert L. Whitby, 29 November 1943.

Steve Whitby
CV-12 Hornet
NS021258d
152k

Imperial Domain of the Golden Dragon (180th meridian crossing) Certificate, RM2/c Robert L. Whitby, 18 March 1944.

Steve Whitby

For more photos of this ship, see:

USS HORNET CV-12 History (Ex- KEARSARGE)
View This Vessels
DANFS History Entry
(Located On The Hazegray & Underway Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)


Crew Contact and Reunion Information
Date: September 9–14, 2014
Place: Hilton Double Tree-Airport Hotel
37 NE Loop 410 (McCullough)
San Antonio, TX, 78216-
(210) 366-2424
Contact: Carl & Sandy Burket, Secretary
Address: P.O. Box 108
Roaring Spring, PA 16673-
Phone: (814) 224-5063
Fax: (814) 224-0078
E-mail: hornetcva@aol.com
Web site: USS Hornet Museum Archives
Remarks: USS Hornet (CV-8, CV, CVA, CVS-12) 66th Reunion.
All Ship’s Company, Officers, Air Groups, Crew, Marines and their Families Welcomed.

Related Links
Hazegray & Underway World Aircraft Carrier Pages, by Andrew Toppan.
Official U.S. Navy Carrier Website
U.S.S. Hornet Association
USS Hornet Museum
USS Hornet CV12/CVA12/CVS12, by Michael McDermott

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This page was created by Paul Yarnall and is maintained by Fabio Peña
All pages copyright NavSource Naval History

Last update: 31 May 2014