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NavSource Online: Aircraft Carrier Photo Archive

USS PRINCETON   (CV-23)
(later CVL-23)


(Profile courtesy of ©Windjammer-Arts Naval Art & Aviation Art)



Flag Hoist/Radio Call Sign: November - Foxtrot - Delta - Charlie

Unit Awards, Campaign and Service Medals and Ribbons

   

Precedence of awards is from top to bottom, left to right
Top Row: American Campaign Medal / Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal (9 stars)
2nd Row: World War II Victory Medal / Philippine Presidential Unit Citation / Philippine Liberation Medal

Independence Class Light Aircraft Carrier
Ordered Laid down Launched Commissioned Decommissioned Stricken
1 Jul 1940(*)
18 Mar 1942(**)
2 Jun 1941 18 Oct 1942 25 Feb 1943   13 Nov 1944
Builder: New York Shipbuilding Corp., Camden, N.J.
(*) As a Light Cruiser (CL-61), see below
(**) As an Aircraft Carrier (CV-23), see below

Fate: Bombed by an enemy aircraft, 24 October 1944, during the Battle of Leyte Gulf. Scuttled by torpedoing by USS Reno (CL-96).

A number of her crew were lost with the ship and remain on active duty.


Specifications
(As built, 1943)
Displacement: 11,000 tons standard; 15,100 tons full load
Dimensions (wl): 600' x 71' 6" x 26' (max)  /  182.9 x 21.8 x 7.9 (max) meters
Dimensions (max.): 622' 6" x 109' 2"  /  189.7 x 33.3 meters
Armor: no side belt (2" belt over fwd magazine); 2" protective deck(s); 0.38" bridge; 5"/3.75" bhds; 5" bhds, 2.25" above, 0.75" below steering gear
Power plant: 4 boilers (565 psi, 850°F); 4 geared turbines; 4 shafts; 100,000 shp (design)
Speed: 31.6 knots
Endurance (design): 12,500 nautical miles @ 15 knots
Armament: 2 quad 40-mm/56-cal gun mounts; 8 (soon 9) twin 40-mm/56-cal gun mounts; 16 single 20-mm/70-cal guns mounts
Aircraft: 30+
Aviation facilities: 2 centerline elevators; 1 hydraulic catapult (H 2-1)
Crew: approx. 1,560


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For Full Size Image
Size Image Description Contributed
By And/Or Copyright
April 1942–October 1944
CV-23 Princeton
NS022346
341k

CV-23 under construction on 1 April 1942, the day after she was renamed from Tallahassee to Princeton. The main deck is being installed but can be seen to be incomplete near the stern.

Photograph from the collections of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, MD, # 19-N-44086.

Tracy White, Reasearcher @ Large
CV-23 Princeton
NS022347
285k

Princeton (CV-23), two days before launch. Forward gun tub is for a 5"/38 gun that was originally planned for the class and was replaced with a smaller tub with a quad 40MM mount before her shakedown cruise. The band stand that will be used as part of the launching ceremony has been built up around the bow.

Photograph from the collections of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, MD, # 19-N-46449.

Tracy White, Reasearcher @ Large
CV-23 Princeton
NS022347a
186k

Two days before launch, showing the aft 5"/38 gun tub the class was originally designed with. When the quad 40MM was in place, this tub always had the underside of the platform enclosed and the guns did not survive long enough to make it on to Princeton's shakedown cruise.

Photograph from the collections of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, MD, # 19-N-46450.

Tracy White, Reasearcher @ Large
CV-23 Princeton
NS022310a
197k

Mrs. Lillian Fay Brakeley, wife of Princeton University Vice President and Treasurer George Brakeley, and Matron of Honor; Rear Admiral Mylo F. Draemel, Commandant of the 4th Naval District; and Mrs. Margaret Dodds, wife of University of Princeton President Harold Dodds, sponsor, after the successful launch of the light carrier Princeton (CV-23), 18 October 1942.

(Special thanks to Sean Hert, who was able to find out Lillian Brakeley's first name via her husband's draft card.)

Photograph from the collections of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, MD, # 19-N-46448.

Tracy White, Reasearcher @ Large
CV-23 Princeton
NS022310
90k

Launching, at the New York Shipbuilding Corporation shipyard, Camden, New Jersey, on 18 October 1942.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives (# 19-N-46451).

NH&HC
CV-23 Princeton
NS022310b
171k

Yard tugs push the captured carrier hull up to dock for her immediate post launch cleanup. Note openings for exhaust stacks.

Photograph from the collections of the National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, MD, # 19-N-46452.

Tracy White, Reasearcher @ Large
CV-23 Princeton
NS022311
111k

USS Princeton (CV-23) underway in the Delaware River, off the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania, 28 March 1943.

Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives (# 19-N-42899).

NHC
CV-23 Princeton
NS022312
91k

Another view, as above (photo # 19-N-42904).

NHC
CV-23 Princeton
NS022308
193k

Underway in the Atlantic area, during her shakedown cruise, 31 May 1943.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-65969).

Scott Dyben
CV-23 Princeton
NS022309
89k

Underway in the Atlantic area, during her shakedown cruise, 31 May 1943. Planes parked aft include nine SBD scout bombers and twelve F4F fighters.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-65971).

Scott Dyben
CV-23 Princeton
NS022309a
138k

USS Princeton (CV-23) with dark paint work to Measure 14 or 21, on 31 May 1943, about three months after commissioning. Whip radio antennas may be seen on the port side of the flight deck. She has TB[F] Avenger and SBD Dauntless aircraft on her flight deck aft. Photo USN.

Photo and text from Aircraft Carriers of the U.S. Navy, by Stefan Terzibaschitsch.

Robert Hurst
CV-23 Princeton
NS022301
97k Another view, as above. USN
CVL-23 Princeton
NS022341
270k

A Grumman F6F-5P Hellcat of VF-23 that crashed on landing on the flight deck of USS Princeton (CLV-23), breaking into two pieces. USN photo.

Robert Hurst
Independence class
NS022227
105k

Independence class. ONI 54-CV, Division of Naval Intelligence, Identification and Characteristics Section, 11-43.

Photos of USS Princeton (CVL-23) and USS Cowpens (CVL-25).

Gerd Matthes, Germany
CVL-23 Princeton
NS022313
84k

USS Princeton (CVL-23) off the Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington, 1 January 1944.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Historical Center (# NH 95647).

NHC
CVL-23 Princeton
NS022314
89k

Another view, as above (photo # NH 95648).

NHC
CVL-23 Princeton
NS022315
79k

Another view, as above (photo # NH 95649).

NHC
CVL-23 Princeton
NS022316
96k

USS Princeton (CVL-23) steaming off Seattle, Washington, 3 January 1944.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Historical Center (# NH 95650).

NHC
CVL-23 Princeton
NS022317
101k

USS Princeton (CVL-23) steaming at 20 knots off Seattle, Washington, 3 January 1944.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Historical Center (# NH 95651).

Seen here sporting a solid Measure 21 camouflage scheme, she was repainted into Measure 33/Design 7A either at Bremerton (Jan. 1944) or at Pearl Harbor (May 1944). She was lost in October 1944 wearing the latter scheme.

Although ships of this class had only one catapult as original equipment, around 1945 some were fitted with a second one. Note that Princeton is carrying SK and SC-2 radars.

(Thanks to Robert Hurst, who provided additional info).

NHC
CVL-23 Princeton
NS022330
66k

Carrier raids on Formosa, October 1944 — A Japanese airplane crashes near USS Princeton (CVL-23), during an air raid off Formosa, 14 October 1944. Battleship in the left distance is probably USS South Dakota (BB-57) or USS Alabama (BB-60).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (# 80-G-285050).

NHC
CVL-23 Princeton
NS022342
38k

Fighting Squadron 27 was established as VGF-27 on 22 April 1942 and operated F4F-4 Wildcats from USS Suwannee (ACV-27) between October 1942 and February 1943. Redesignated VF-27 on 1 March 1943, the squadron operated ashore at Guadalcanal until July, except for a brief period at sea in June. After reforming with F6F Hellcats, VF-27 embarked in USS Princeton (CVL-23) for one of the most spectacular CVL cruises, May–October 1944. FitRon 27 made its last war cruise aboard USS Independence (CVL-22), July–September 1945, and was disestablished 26 October 1945.

Text adapted from U.S. Navy Fighter Squadrons in World War II, by Barrett Tillman.

Tommy Trampp
CVL-23 Princeton
NS022343
100k

Ernest John Schirmer was a Photographer's Mate on USS Princeton (CVL-23) when she was sunk.

Ernie Schirmer, son of Ernest John Schirmer
CVL-23 Princeton
NS022344
175k

USS Princeton, The Mighty "P", a poem. Typed on onion skin paper.

CVL-23 Princeton
NS022345
231k

USS Princeton, The Mighty "P", a history. Typed on onion skin paper.

CVL-23 Princeton
NS022345a
212k

For more information about this ship, see:

Read the USS Princeton (CV-23 / CVL-23) DANFS History entry

Crew Contact and Reunion Information
Date:  
Place:  
Contact: Mr. Donald M Scheer
Address: 1518 N Olney St
Indianapolis, IN, 46201-1458
Phone: 317-637-9745
E-mail:  
Web site:  
Remarks:  

Related Links
Hazegray & Underway World Aircraft Carrier Pages By Andrew Toppan.
Official U.S. Navy Carrier Website

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Last update: 31 July 2016