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USS HOPKINS (DD-6)


Flag Hoist/Radio Call Sign - NHC

CLASS - HOPKINS As Built.
Displacement 408 Tons, Dimensions, 248' 8" (oa) x 24' 6" x 10' 6" (Max)
Armament 2 x 3"/50, 5 x 6pdr, 2 x 18" tt..
Machinery, 7,200 IHP; 2 Vertical, Inverted, Triple Expansion Engines, 2 screws
Speed, 29 Knots, Crew 73.
Operational and Building Data
Laid down by Harlan & Holligsworth,Wilmington on February 2 1899.
Launched April 24 1902 and commissioned September 23 1903.
Decommissioned at Philadelphia June 20 1919.
Stricken October 2 1919.
Fate Sold September 7 1920 to Denton Shore Lumber Co., Tampa for $7,000 and broken up for scrap.

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Hopkins 74kCommodore Esek Hopkins, Continental Navy was born in Rhode Island on 26 April 1718. As a young man he began a career at sea, captaining merchant vessels and, during the French and Indian War, a successful privateer. After the American Revolution broke out in 1775, Rhode Island appointed Hopkins as commander of its military forces. Later in that year he became Commander in Chief of the still very small Continental Navy. In mid-February 1776, Commodore Hopkins sailed from Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, under orders from the Continental Congress to attack British maritime forces in the Chesapeake Bay, along the southern coast and off Rhode Island. Realizing that enemy strength was too great to permit execution of this ambitious task, Hopkins instead undertook what would be the Navy's first amphibious offensive. On 3 March, his squadron put a landing party ashore on New Providence Island, in the Bahamas, seized the local defensive works and captured a stock of equipment and supplies that were badly needed for military purposes in the rebellious American colonies. On 4 April 1776, while en route home, the Continental ships encountered and captured two small British warships. Two days later they had an inconclusive engagement with HMS Glasgow. Hopkins' squadron arrived at New London, Connecticut, on 8 April. Hopkins' conduct of his operations produced considerable controversy. Though censured by the Congress, he remained in charge of the American Navy for the next year, during which time his ships were based in southern New England. Continued dissatisfaction with his performance led to loss of his command in 1777 and dismissal from the service early in 1778. Esek Hopkins retained his local popularity, however, serving in the Rhode Island legislature during most of the next decade and remaining active in the state's affairs until his death on 26 February 1802. Photo #: NH 49075. Commander in Chief of the Continental Navy, 1775-1777 Line engraving by J.C. Buttre, New York, published during the 19th Century. It includes a facsimile of Hopkins' signature. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Bill Gonyo
Hopkins 33kUndated, location unknown. Photo from Jane's Fighting Ships 1914.Robert Hurst
Hopkins 107kUSS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6) at anchor, circa 1904. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fred Weiss
Hopkins 106kUSS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6) Halftone reproduction of a photograph taken in 1906. Published at about that time by Chilton Printing Company, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1972. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fred Weiss/Ed Zajkowski
Hopkins 71kPhoto #: NH 98240, USS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6) damage to the ship's port side, forward, received in a collision with USS Vesuvius. The original print was on a postal card mailed in April 1907. Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of Rear Admiral C.M. Thomas. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Paul Rebold
Hopkins 100kDestroyers and other ships at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, Autumn 1907. Ships at left are (from front to rear): USS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6); USS Lawrence (Destroyer # 8); USS Hull (Destroyer # 7); USS Talbot (Torpedo Boat # 15) and USS Moccassin (Submarine # 5). The latter two are hauled out on the marine railway. USS Stewart (Destroyer # 13) is in the right foreground. Ahead of her are a torpedo boat, a barge and the tug Mohawk. Three battleships are docked beyond them, with USS Iowa (Battleship # 4) furthest to the right. Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives. Photo # 19-N-60-10-20.Robert Hurst
Hopkins 150kUSS Hopkins (DD-6), at anchor, circa 1908, location unknown. National Archives and Records Administration, cataloged under the ARC Identifier (National Archives Identifier) 513021.Robert Hurst
Hopkins 88kUSS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6) Steams past Alcatraz Island, San Francisco Bay, California, circa May-July 1908, during the "Great White Fleet"'s visit to the West Coast. Collection of Chief Quartermaster John Harold. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fred Weiss
Hopkins 94kUSS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6) anchored at San Diego, California, prior to World War I. Photographed by the Arcade View Company, San Diego. Courtesy of Jack L. Howland, 1983. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fred Weiss
Hopkins 154kUSS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6) at San Francisco, California, shortly before the U.S. entered World War I. Note the ship's number painted on her bow. Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1968. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fred Weiss
Hopkins 102kDestroyers at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, Autumn 1907. These ships are (from left to right): USS Hull (Destroyer # 7); USS Lawrence (Destroyer # 8); USS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6); USS Whipple (Destroyer # 15) and USS Truxtun (Destroyer # 14). Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.Fred Weiss
Hopkins 102kPhoto #: 19-N-60-10-17, destroyers at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, Autumn 1907. The destroyers in the foreground basin (from left to right): USS Hull (Destroyer # 7); USS Lawrence (Destroyer # 8); USS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6); USS Whipple (Destroyer # 15) and USS Truxtun (Destroyer # 14). USS Stewart (Destroyer # 13) is at the end of the dock, at right, and USS Talbot (Torpedo Boat # 15) is hauled out on the marine railway at left. On the opposite side of the river are several torpedo boats of the Reserve Torpedo Flotilla and their barracks ship, the old cruiser Atlanta. Photograph from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.Tony Cowart
Hopkins 98kPhoto #: NH 93693, Pacific Fleet Destroyers moored together at San Diego, California, circa 1909-1911. Photographed by the Arcade View Company, San Diego. These ships are (from left to right): USS Paul Jones or Perry (Destroyer # 10 or 11); USS Preble (Destroyer # 12); USS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6); USS Truxtun (Destroyer # 14); USS Stewart (Destroyer # 13); USS Lawrence (Destroyer # 8); USS Hull (Destroyer # 7); and USS Whipple (Destroyer # 15). The numeral "2", painted on some of these destroyers, indicates they are members of the Second Torpedo Division. Courtesy of Jack Howland, 1982. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Hopkins 482kNewspaper clipping of onboard explosion, February 15 1910.Mike Mohl
Hopkins 149kU.S. Navy Destroyers at San Pedro, California, circa 1910-1914. The original photograph was published on a color-tinted postcard by the M. Kashower Company, Los Angeles, California, at about the time it was taken. These destroyers are (from left to right): USS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6); USS Whipple (Destroyer # 15); and USS Hull (Destroyer # 7). Courtesy of R.D. Jeska, 1984. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fred Weiss
Hopkins 74kUSS Hull (Destroyer # 7); USS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6); and USS Stewart (Destroyer # 13) -- listed from left to right In port, probably at San Diego, California, circa 1909-1911. Photographed by Fred W. Kelsey. Courtesy of R.W. Cunningham, 1971. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fred Weiss
Hopkins 300kNewspaper clipping from The Daily Silver Belt of Gila County, Arizona dated February 27 1910.Mike Mohl
Hopkins 214kPhoto MINSY 223-12-1911. USS Cleveland (C 19) is to the left of the dry dock and in dry dock are USS Preble (DD 12) (left) USS Farragut (TB 11) (right), next is USS Hopkins (DD 6) and USS Perry (DD 11) and the Tug Unadilla (YT 4) in the rear of the dock in the middle position at Mare Island on December 14, 1911.Darryl Baker
Hopkins 229kPhoto MINSY 224-12-1911. USS Hopkins (DD 6) and USS Perry (DD 11) followed by USS Preble (DD 12) and USS Farragut (TB 11) are seen in dry dock #2 at Mare Island on December 14, 1911.Darryl Baker
Hopkins 91kPhoto #: NH 94955, USS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6), at left, and USS Paul Jones (Destroyer # 10) off Old Point Comfort, Hampton Roads, Virginia, in 1918. Note the pattern camouflage worn by Paul Jones. Courtesy of Jack Howland, 1983. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Paul Rebold
Hopkins 168kPhiladelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania, Old destroyers in the Reserve Basin, 13 June 1919, while awaiting decommissioning. Note the truck and liferafts on the pier. These ships are (from left to right): USS Worden (Destroyer # 16); USS Barry (Destroyer # 2); USS Hull (Destroyer # 7); USS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6) -- probably; USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1); USS Stewart (Destroyer # 13); USS Paul Jones (Destroyer # 10); and USS Decatur (Destroyer # 5). Ships further to the right can not be identified. Courtesy of Frank Jankowski, 1981. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fred Weiss
Hopkins 81kPhoto #: NH 43036, Philadelphia Navy Yard, destroyers awaiting decommissioning in the Navy Yard's Reserve Basin, during the Spring of 1919. Photographed by La Tour.dShips present are (from left to right): USS Isabel; four unidentified "750-ton" type destroyers; USS Preble (Destroyer # 12); USS Decatur (Destroyer # 5); USS Paul Jones (Destroyer # 10); USS Stewart (Destroyer # 13); USS Bainbridge (Destroyer # 1); USS Hopkins (Destroyer # 6); USS Hull (Destroyer # 7); USS Barry (Destroyer # 2); USS Worden (Destroyer # 16); USS Truxtun (Destroyer # 14); USS Whipple (Destroyer # 15); USS Perry (Destroyer # 11); USS Lawrence (Destroyer # 8); and USS Dale (Destroyer # 4). U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart

USS HOPKINS DD-6 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry
(Located On The hazegray Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)

Commanding Officers
Thanks to David Wright

LCDR Montgomery Meigs Taylor    Sep 23 1903 - Dec 26 1905 (Later RADM)
LT Charles William Forman    Dec 26 1905 - Jul 27 1906
LT Merlyn Grail Cook    Jul 27 1906 - Dec 3 1906
LT Alfred Graham Howe    Dec 3 1906 - Jun 1 1908 (Later RADM)
LTJG Ernest Friedrick    Jun 1 1908 - Mar 15 1910
LT Harold Gardiner Bowen Sr.    Mar 15 1910 - Sep 5 1911 (Later VADM)
LTJG Irving Hall Mayfield    Sep 5 1911 - Nov 1 1912
LTJG James Laurence Kauffman    Nov 1 1912 - Jan 4 1914
LT John Enoch Pond    Jan 4 1914 - Dec 15 1914
LTJG Joseph Augustine Murphy    Dec 15 1914 - Sep 16 1916
LTJG James Grady Ware    Sep 16 1916 - Apr 10 1917
LT Arthur Stuart Walton    Apr 10 1917 - Oct 24 1918
LCDR Robert Gibson Tobin    Oct 24 1918 - Jun 20 1919

Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
Tin Can Sailors Website
Destroyer History Foundation
Destroyers Online Website
Official U.S.Navy Destroyer Website

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