NavSource Main Page FAQ Contact us Search NavSource

Waving US Flag

NavSource Naval History
Photographic History of the United States Navy
DESTROYER
ARCHIVE

USS MOMSEN (DDG-92)

CLASS - BURKE Flight IIa As Built.
Displacement 8373 Tons (Full), Dimensions, 509' 5" (oa) x 66' 11" x 20' (Max)
Armament 1 x 5"/62 RF, Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile (ESSM), 96 VLS Cells,
2 SH-60B helicopters, 8 Harpoon Missiles, 6 x 12.75" TT.
Machinery, 100,000 SHP; 4 GE LM-2500 Gas Turbines, 2 screws
Speed, 30+ Knots, Range 4400 NM@ 20 Knots, Crew 370.
Operational and Building Data
Keel laid Nov 16 2001, by Bath Iron Works.
Christened Bath, ME August 9 2003.
Commissioned August 28 2004 at Panama City, FL.
Active unit of the U.S. Navy.
Homeported at Everett, WA

Click On Image
For Full Size Image
Size Image Description Contributed
By
Momsen

Momsen
68k




99k
Charles Bowers Momsen was born in Flushing, Long Island, New York, on 21 June 1896, son of Hart and Susie (Bowers) Momsen. Nicknamed "The Swede," Momsen was in reality of Danish descent. He attended public schools in Washington, DC and St. Paul, Minnesota, before his appointment in 1916 to the US Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, from the Fourth District of Minnesota. As a midshipman he played football and baseball, and during the summer of 1918, served in USS Kansas (Battleship No.21) on Atlantic escort duty during World War I. He was graduated and commissioned ensign on 7 June 1919. He remained in Annapolis under instruction until September, when he joined USS Oklahoma (Battleship No.37), operating with Division Seven, Battleship Squadron Three, Atlantic Fleet. Detached in June 1921, he reported to the Newport News (Virginia) Shipbuilding Company where USS Maryland (Battleship No.46) was fitting out. He served aboard that battleship from her commissioning on 21 July 1921 until September 1921. Following submarine training at the Naval Submarine Base, New London, Connecticut, he reported in January 1922 as Executive Officer of the submarine USS O-13 (SS-74), based at Coco Solo in the Panama Canal Zone. From June 1923 to June 1927 he successfully commanded the submarines 0-15 (SS-76), R-24 (SS-101) and S-1 (SS-105). He then served a tour of duty at the Design Division of the Bureau of Construction and Repair, Navy Department, Washington, DC. Detached in June 1929, he was ordered to the Submarine Safety Test Unit, aboard USS S-4 (SS-109), a floating laboratory. During this period, which ended in September 1932, he was engaged in the design of a submarine escape breathing apparatus, later known as the "Momsen Lung." For this development, he was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal, with citation which states in part: "During the early stages of its (the Lung's) design and development (he)...courageously, repeatedly and voluntarily risked his life in conducting experiments of a nature such that there was little or no information available as to their probable results. In the later tests of the device, when escapes were made from USS S-4 submerged to depths as much as 206 feet, he was not only the first person to venture the escape but also the leading and guiding spirit in all subsequent ones..." Between September 1932 and March 1934 he was assigned to the Submarine Base, Pearl Harbor, and for ten months thereafter he had sea duty as Engineering Officer of USS Oglala (CM-4). Detached from that minelayer in January 1935, he reported the following month as Executive Officer of submarine tender USS Canopus (AS-9), a unit of Submarine Squadron Five. In February 1936 he was transferred to the light cruiser USS Augusta (CL-31) for services first as Engineer Officer, and later, as First Lieutenant and Damage Control Officer. In August 1937 he reported as Officer in Charge of Experimental Diving at the Navy Yard, Washington, D.C. While there, he helped develop a new set of decompression tables and supported proposals for the use of a helium and oxygen air mixture in deep diving operations. He also assisted in the successful salvage and rescue of crew members from the submarine Squalus after she sank in approximately two hundred and forty feet of water off the Isle of Shoals in May 1939. For especially creditable and outstanding performance of duty during this operation, he was commended by the President of the United States and the Secretary of the Navy. After assuming command of the cargo ship USS Sirius (AK-15) in September 1939 he remained there until October 1941 when he was detached for duty in the Fourteenth Naval District, Pearl Harbor, T. H. Momsen remained there in connection with war operations after the Japanese attack on 7 December 1941, and in July 1942 was designated as Assistant Chief of Staff and War Plans Officer, to the Commander Hawaiian Sea Frontier. In February 1943 he reported as Commander Submarine Squadron Two, and in November of the same year transferred in like capacity, to Submarine Squadron Four. For his special contributions to submarine warfare from February 1943 to June 1944, he was awarded the Navy Cross, the Legion of Merit, and a Gold Star in lieu of a second Legion of Merit, with Combat "V." The citations follow, in part: Navy Cross: "For extraordinary heroism as Commander of a Coordinated Attack Group of Submarines operating in the enemy Japanese-controlled waters of the East China Sea. A master of submarine warfare, (he) evolved a doctrine of attack whereby submarines could be organized into an attack group capable of operating deep in enemy-controlled waters while maintaining full striking power...The submarines under his command sank five Japanese ships totaling over 38,000 tons and damaged eight ships totaling 63,000 tons..." Legion of Merit: "For exceptionally meritorious conduct...as Commander Submarine Squadron) Two...With unfailing patience and a careful analysis of the faulty performance of submarine torpedo exploders which resulted in an alarming number of duds occurring in attacks by submarines of this force, (he) personally supervised an investigation to determine the weaknesses of the exploder then in use and, correlating his own ideas with those submitted by others, succeeded in developing a vastly improved exploder which insured efficiency of our submarines in subsequent actions. During one experimental phase of the program when a war shot torpedo fired into a cliff failed to explode, he unhesitatingly, and at great risk of life, entered the water and assisted in the recovery of this live torpedo for further examination..." Gold Star in lieu of Second Legion of Merit: "For...outstanding services...as Commander Submarine Squadron Two from February to November 1943, and as Commander Submarine Squadron Four from November 1943 to May 1944, with additional duty as Chief of Staff, Commander Training Command, Submarine Forces, United States Pacific Fleet, from November 1943 to April 1944...(He) was responsible in a large way for the success of Squadron Two and Four in completing many war patrols in enemy waters and in sinking many thousands of tons of hostile shipping..." Between June and December 1944, he had duty in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Navy Department, and when detached he assumed command of USS South Dakota (BB-57). Under his command, that battleship took part in operations against Japan, attacking enemy installations in the area of Tokyo. "For exceptionally meritorious conduct...as Commanding Officer of USS South Dakota...from December 1944 to August 1945..." he was awarded a Gold Star in lieu of the Third Legion of Merit, with Combat "V." The citation states that he "contributed in a large measure to the infliction of serious damage upon enemy forces and shore installations, and effectively directed his ship in numerous air actions and several bombardments of enemy shore defenses including the first Naval bombardment of the Japanese main island of Honshu." He also received a letter of commendation from the Commander Fifth Fleet, with authorization to wear the Commendation Ribbon and Combat "V," for outstanding service while in command of USS South Dakota during the support of the assault operations on Okinawa from 14 March to 14 May 1945. When relieved of the command of South Dakota in July 1945, he was assigned to Headquarters, Commander in Chief, United States Fleet, at the Navy Department, Washington, DC, to prepare for the invasion of Japan, scheduled for April 1946. After the Japanese surrender on 2 September 1945, he was ordered to duty as Administrator, US Naval Shipping Control Authority for Japanese Merchant Marine, concerned with repatriation of Japanese civilian and military personnel. He was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal by the War Department, and cited as follows: "(He) performed exceptionally meritorious and distinguished service in Japan from November 1945 to October 1946. He directed the shipping of the Japanese Civilian Merchant Marine in repatriating nearly six million people. He provided for the proficient training of Japanese crews, and resourcefully integrated United States and Japanese shipping into an effective organization which insured the safe and expeditious return of millions of displaced persons to their homes..." On 15 October 1946, he became Commandant of the Naval Operating Base, Guam, Marianas Islands, continuing to serve as such until January 1947, when he joined the staff of Commander, Marianas Islands as Chief of Staff and Aide. After his return to the United States, he was a member of the General Board, Navy Department, from June 1947 to May 1948, and for three years thereafter served as Assistant Chief of Naval Operations for Undersea Warfare, Navy Department. On 21 May 1951 he reported as Commander Submarine Force, Pacific Fleet, in which assignment he served for two years. On 2 June 1953 he was sent to Boston, Massachusetts to be Commandant of the First Naval District, with additional duty as Commander Naval Base, Boston, and Commander Naval Base, Portsmouth, New Hampshire. In April 1945 he was designated Commander Joint Task Force Seven, and continued to serve as such until relieved of all active duty pending his retirement, effective 1 September 1955. In addition to the Navy Cross, the Distinguished Service Medal (Navy), the Distinguished Service Medal (Army), the Legion of Merit with two Gold Stars and Combat "V," and the Commendation Ribbon with Combat "V," Vice Admiral Momsen received the World War I Victory Medal, Escort Clasp; the American Defense Service Medal, Fleet Clasp; the Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal; the American Campaign Medal; the World War II Victory Medal; Navy Occupation Service Medal (Asia Clasp); National Defense Service Medal; and the Philippine Liberation Ribbon with one bronze star. Vice Admiral Momsen was married on 18 December 1953, to Mrs. Anne I. Schmidt of St. Petersburg, Florida. He has two children by a former marriage, Commander Charles B. Momsen, Jr., USN (US Naval Academy Class of 1942); and Mrs. Evelyn Momsen Hailey. On 1 September 1955 he was transferred to the Retired List of the US Navy, and was advanced to the rank of Vice Admiral on the basis of combat awards. After retirement, he served as a consultant to several corporations including General Dynamics, Raytheon, and US Rubber. Charles B. Momsen, aged 70, died of cancer on Thursday, 25 May 1967, at Bay Pine Veterans Hospital in St. Petersburg, Florida.Steven A. Cardali/Robert M. Cieri
Momsen 49kArtist's conception of the Momsen as built by the renowned graphic illustrator John Barrett with the text written by naval author and historian Robert F. Sumrall. Their company Navy Yard Associates offers prints of most destroyers, destroyer escorts, submarines and aircraft carriers in various configurations during the ship's lifetime. The prints can be customized with ship's patches, your photograph, your bio, etc. If you decide to purchase artwork from them please indicate that you heard about their work from NavSource.Navy Yard Associates
Momsen 117kPCU Momsen DDG-92 (in the water), PCU Bainbridge DDG-96 (closest to Momsen) and PCU Nitze DDG-94 (on the right) at Bath Iron Works.Rexford Dundon
Momsen 59kThe Chafee (DDG-90) and Momsen (DDG-92) as construction continues at Bath Iron Works on June 6, 2002.USN
Momsen 62kA portion of the Momsen at Bath Iron Works in June 2002 ready for assembly.Rexford Dundon
Momsen 74kThe mast raising.Rexford Dundon
Momsen 61kMoving on the BIW Land Level Transfer Facility into drydock.Rexford Dundon
Chafee 63kUSS Chaffee (DDG-90) (foreground) and USS Momsen (DDG-92) under construction at Bath Iron Works.Robert Hurst
Momsen 107kBIW sign anouncing the Christening ceremony.Rexford Dundon
Momsen 103kThe Christening ceremony.Chester O. Morris
Momsen 93kThe Christening ceremony, August 9 2003.Rexford Dundon
Momsen 70kThe Christening ceremony phamphlet.Chester O. Morris
Momsen 120kUSS Momsen DDG-92, Returning from Charlie trials as she enters the Kennebeck River heading up river to Bath Iron Works. Taken on March 24, 2003 at Fort Popham, Maine.Steven A. Cardali
Momsen 64kNewspaper photo of the Momsen on Bravo trials in March 2004.Chester O. Morris
Momsen 244kUSS Momsen (DDG-92) letterpress reproduction of a photograph taken on 18 March 2004, during the ship's sea trials. Photograph by Bath Iron Works. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command. Photo # NH 106859-KN.Robnert Hurst
Momsen 90k2004 Open House photo of the AN/WLD-1(V)1 Mine Reconnaissance System.Duane Curtis
Momsen 41kAs above.Duane Curtis
Momsen 125kPanama City, Fla. (Aug. 20, 2004) the Navy’s newest guided-missile destroyer, Momsen (DDG 92), receives a full escort by a helicopter and a high-speed patrol boat as the ship pulls into Panama City. Momsen will be commissioned on Aug. 28, 2004, in Panama City in honor of Vice Admiral Charles "Swede" Momsen. U.S. Navy photo.Fred Weiss/Steven A. Cardali
Momsen 92kSan Francisco Bay, CA, October 9 2004, the guided missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92), foreground, and guided missile frigate USS Jarrett (FFG 33) sail into San Francisco Bay at the start of the “Parade of Ships, the official kick off of the 24th annual San Francisco Fleet Week. U.S. Navy photo.Fred Weiss
Momsen 57k041009-N-7217H-016, San Francisco Bay, CA, October 9 2004, from right, the guided missile destroyers USS John Paul Jones (DDG 53) and USS Momsen (DDG 92), and the guided missile frigate USS Jarrett (FFG 33) sail into San Francisco Bay, Calif., at the start of Fleet Week 2004. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 1st Class Marvin Harris.Tony Cowart
Momsen 89kDF-SD-07-02543, 060406-N-8825R-035. A starboard bow view of the US Navy (USN) Arleigh Burke Class (Flight IIA): Guided Missile Destroyer (Aegis), USS MOMSEN (DDG 92), showing Sailors manning the rails as the ship pulls away from the pier at Naval Station (NS) Everett, Washington (WA). The MOMSEN and her crew are getting underway for their maiden deployment to monitor maritime operations in Southeast Asia, in support of the global war on terrorism. Photo by PH3 Aramis Ramirez, April 6 2006.Bill Gonyo
Momsen 109kMajuro, Marshall Islands, September 7 2006, USS Momsen (DDG 92), an Arleigh Burke-class destroyer in the United States Navy Seventh Fleet, visited Majuro, the capitol city of the Marshall Islands on September 7-8, for refueling and overnight rest for the officers and crew. Photo courtesy USS Momsen.Bill Gonyo
Momsen 75k060922-N-3390M-002. Everett, WA, September 22 2006, sailors assigned to the guided missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92) man the rails while pulling into their homeport at Naval Station Everett after a regularly scheduled deployment. Momsen deployed to the Western Pacific in support of U.S. Pacific Command and Commander, Seventh Fleet Joint Task Force operations in support of the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Douglas G. Morrison.Bill Gonyo
Momsen 113k060922-N-3390M-013. Everett, WA, September 22 2006, family and friends gather to greet loved ones as the guided missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92) pulls into its homeport at Naval Station Everett after a regularly scheduled deployment. Momsen deployed to the Western Pacific in support of U.S. Pacific Command and Commander, Seventh Fleet Joint Task Force operations in support of the global war on terrorism. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Douglas G. Morrison.Bill Gonyo
Momsen 113kAt NavSta San Diego in August 2007.Richard Miller
Momsen 147k071105-N-7981E-163. Pacific Ocean, November 5 2007, a rigid hull inflatable boat from Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Momson (DDG 92) approaches USS Shoup (DDG 86) during a personnel transfer. Shoup, Momson, and the rest of Carrier Strike Group 9, are underway off the coast of Southern California participating in Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMTUEX), an exercise designed to enhance the interoperability of the strike group. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class James R. Evans.Robert M. Cieri
Momsen 83k080126-N-7981E-556. Pacific Ocean, January 26 2008, ships assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln Strike Group, led by the guided missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92) during a straight transit exercise. Ships and aircraft assigned to Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 are underway off the coast of Southern California participating in a Joint Task Force Exercise. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans.Chet Morris
Momsen 169k080126-N-7981E-830. Pacific Ocean, January 26 2008, Sonar Technician (Surface) 1st Class Mark Osborne supervises Sonar Technician (Surface) 2nd Class Randy Loewen, left, and Sonar Technician (Surface) 3rd Class Roland Stout, right, as they monitor contacts on an AN/SQQ-89V15 Surface Anti Submarine Combat System, aboard the guided missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92). Ships and aircraft assigned to Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 are underway off the coast of Southern California participating in a Joint Task Force Exercise. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans.Bill Gonyo
Momsen 89k080126-N-7981E-165. Pacific Ocean, January 26 2008, ships assigned to USS Abraham Lincoln Strike Group, led by the guided missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92) during a straits transits exercise. Ships and aircraft assigned to Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 9 are underway off the coast of Southern California participating in a Joint Task Force Exercise. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans.Robert M. Cieri
Momsen 203k080126-N-7981E-825. Pacific Ocean, January 26 2008, Sonar Technician (Surface) 1st Class Mark Osborne supervises Sonar Technician (Surface) 2nd Class Randy Loewen, right, and Sonar Technician (Surface) 3rd Class Roland Stout, left, as they monitor contacts on an AN/SQQ-89V15 Surface Anti Submarine Combat System, aboard the guided missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92). U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans.Robert M. Cieri
Momsen 190k080127-N-DR144-150. Pacific Ocean, January 27 2008, The Secretary of the Navy, the honorable Dr. Donald Winter speaks with Cmdr. Michael Sparks, commanding officer of guided-missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92), in the ship's in-port cabin while under way. Dr. Winter and members of the press toured the ship to observe how ships are mitigating the impact of sonar on marine mammals. Momsen, as a part of USS Abraham Lincoln Strike Group, participated in a joint task force exercise off the coast of Southern California. US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans.Robert M. Cieri
Momsen 215k080508-N-0803S-005. Mombasa, Kenya, May 7 2008, Maj. Gen. Samson Jefwa Mwathethe, Commander, Kenyan Navy, arrives aboard USS Momsen (DDG 92) for a shipboard reception that brought together U.S. and Kenyan officials. Momsen made a three-day port call to Mombasa to strengthen both the friendship and partnership between the U.S and Kenya. Momsen is currently underway as part of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, which is on deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations to support Maritime Security Operations (MSO). MSO helps develop security, which promotes stability and global prosperity in the maritime environment. These operations complement the counter terrorism and security efforts of regional nations and seek to disrupt violent extremists’ use of the maritime environment as a venue for attack or to transport personnel, weapons or other material. Official U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Nathan Schaeffer.Bill Gonyo
Momsen 154k080507-N-0803S-002. Mombasa, Kenya, May 8 2008, Kenyan Sailors practice U.S. Navy damage control techniques aboard USS Momsen (DDG 92). Momsen made a three-day port call to Mombasa to strengthen both the friendship and partnership between the U.S and Kenyan navies and governments. Momsen is currently underway as part of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, which is on deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of operations to support Maritime Security Operations (MSO). MSO helps develop security, which promotes stability and global prosperity in the maritime environment. These operations complement the counterterrorism and security efforts of regional nations and seek to disrupt violent extremists’ use of the maritime environment as a venue for attack or to transport personnel, weapons or other material. Official U.S. Navy Photo by Mass Communication Specialist Nathan Schaeffer.Bill Gonyo
Russell 87k080905-N-9079D-409. Indian Ocean, September 5 2008, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Russell (DDG 59) leads USS Momsen (DDG 92), the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), and the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Curts (FFG 38) alongside the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Strike Group is on a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility operating in the western Pacific and Indian oceans. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Ronald A. Dallatorre.Robert M. Cieri
Russell 159k080905-N-8593M-057. Indian Ocean, September 5 2008, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Russell (DDG 59), foreground, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92), the Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Mobile Bay (CG 53), and the Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Curts (FFG 38) take part in a photo exercise alongside the aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72). The Abraham Lincoln Strike Group is on a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility operating in the western Pacific and Indian oceans. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Michael K. McNabb.Robert M. Cieri
Russell 184k080905-N-7981E-288. Indian Ocean, September 5 2008, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92) transits the Indian Ocean with the Abraham Lincoln Strike Group. The Abraham Lincoln Strike Group is on a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility operating in the western Pacific and Indian oceans. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans.Robert M. Cieri
Momsen 100k080907-N-7981E-148. Indian Ocean, September 7 2008, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92) approaches the Military Sealift Command dry cargo/ammunition ship USNS Richard C. Byrd (T-AKE 4) during an underway replenishment between Byrd and ships from USS Abraham Lincoln Strike Group. The Abraham Lincoln Strike Group is on a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility operating in the western Pacific and Indian oceans. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class James R. Evans.Robert M. Cieri
Momsen 84k081012-N-1745W-009. Everett, Wash., October 12 2008, sailors man the rails aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92) as she prepares to moor at her homeport of Everett, assisted by Skenandoa (YTB 835). The Abraham Lincoln Strike Group, to which Momsen is attached, is returning from a seven-month deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Brandon C. Wilson.Robert M. Cieri
Momsen 93k100728-N-9924T-001. Pacific Ocean, July 28 2010, the guided-missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92) conducts a firing exercise at the San Clemente Island Shore Bombardment Area. Momsen is getting ready for a deployment with the Abraham Lincoln Strike Group. The strike group is underway for a composite unit training exercise (COMPTUEX). U.S. Navy photo by Fire Controlman 1st Class Alicia M. Travis.Bill Gonyo
Momsen 194k120119-N-OY799-229. Arabian Sea, January 19 2012, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92) is alongside the Military Sealift Command dry cargo and ammunition ship USNS Charles R. Drew (T-AKE 10) during a refueling at sea. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Kenneth Abbate.Lee Wahler
Momsen 139k120129-N-WD757-086. Egypt, January 29 2012, the guided-missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92) emerges from beneath the Freedom Bridge, while transiting the Suez Canal. Momsen, part of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, was deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility, conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions for Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Carlos M. Vazquez II, USN.Robert M. Cieri
Momsen 172k120218-N-WD757-638. Gulf of Oman, February 18 2012, Quartermaster 3rd Class Rebecca Periut, left, charts a course as Quartermaster Seaman Apprentice Monica Crout records the data in a log on the bridge of the guided missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92) , while under way. Momsen is deployed to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility as part of the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group conducting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in support of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Carlos M. Vazquez II, USN.Robert M. Cieri
Momsen 215k120305-N-WD757-031. Salahla, Oman, March 5 2012, sailors connect a pelican hook to the anchor chain of the guided-missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92) as the ship pulls into port. Momsen, deployed with the Abraham Lincoln Carrier Strike Group, is supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th Fleet's area of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Carlos M. Vazquez II, USN.Robert M. Cieri
Momsen 128kThe Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Preble (DDG 88) and USS Momsen (DDG 92) transit the Pacific Ocean. Preble and Momsen are deployed with Carrier Strike Group (CSG) 11 for a deployment to the western Pacific region. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Raul Moreno Jr. Photo 130429-N-LP801-098.Ron Reeves
Momsen 190k130525-N-YU572-135. Java Sea, May 25 2013, the guided-missile destroyer USS Momsen (DDG 92) fires it's 25 mm chain gun during a live-fire exercise aboard during Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Indonesia 2013. More than 1,000 Sailors and Marines are participating in CARAT Indonesia. CARAT is a series of bilateral military exercises between the U.S. Navy and the armed forces of Bangladesh, Brunei, Cambodia, Indonesia, Malaysia, the Philippines, Singapore, Thailand and Timor Leste. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jay C. Pugh.Ron Reeves
Momsen 52kIn the background, October 21 2013 at Everett, WA.Ron Reeves
Momsen 47kShips patch.Mike Smolinski
Momsen 7kShips patch.Steven A. Cardali

USS MOMSEN DDG-92 History
Note: History is unavailable at this time
This ship was built too late to be covered by the DANFS project

Commanding Officers
Thanks to Wolfgang Hechler & Ron Reeves

CDR Edward Francis Kenyon    Aug 28 2004 - Aug 19 2005
CDR Patrick Michael Kelly    Aug 19 2005 - Apr 23 2007
CDR Michael C. Sparks    Apr 23 2007 - Oct 31 2008
CDR Robert W. Bodvake    Oct 31 2008 - Jul 8 2010
CDR Jay DeWayne Wylie    Jul 8 2010 - Apr 27 2011
CAPT Mark Johnson    Apr 27 2011 – May 20 2011
CDR Matthew Paul Roberts        May 20 2011 – Mar 14 2013
CDR Elaine A. Collins    Mar 14 2013 - Aug 21 2014     
CDR Javier Gonzalez    Aug 21 2014 - present     

Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
USS Momsen DDG-92 Website
Tin Can Sailors Website
Destroyer History Foundation
Destroyers Online Website
Official U.S.Navy Destroyer Website

Back To The Main Photo Index To The Destroyer Index Page


Comments and Suggestions about this page, E-mail DestroyerInfo
Problems and site related matters, E-mail Webmaster