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USS NITZE (DDG-94)


Flag Hoist/Radio Call Sign - NCWR

CLASS - BURKE Flight IIa As Built.
Displacement 8373 Tons (Full), Dimensions, 509' 5" (oa) x 66' 11" x 20' (Max)
Armament 1 x 5"/62 RF, Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile (ESSM), 96 VLS Cells,
2 SH-60B helicopters, 8 Harpoon Missiles, 6 x 12.75" TT.
Machinery, 100,000 SHP; 4 GE LM-2500 Gas Turbines, 2 screws
Speed, 30+ Knots, Range 4400 NM@ 20 Knots, Crew 370.
Operational and Building Data
Keel layed September 20 2002 at Bath Iron Works, Bath, ME
Christened April 17 2004 at Bath ME
Commissioned March 5 2005 at Norfolk, VA.
Active unit of the U.S. Navy.
Homeported at Norfolk, VA.

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Nitze 104kPaul Henry Nitze was born in Amherst, Massachusetts on January 16, 1907. Paul H. Nitze graduated "Cum Laude" from Harvard University in 1928. He first entered government service in 1941. In 1942, he became the Chief of the Metals and Minerals Branch of the Board of Economic Warfare, until named Director, Foreign Procurement and Development Branch of the Foreign Economic Administration in 1943. During the period between 1944-1946, Nitze served as Director and then as Vice Chairman of the U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey for which President Truman awarded him the Medal of Merit. Over the next several years he served with the Department of State, beginning as the Deputy Director of the Office of International Trade Policy. In 1949, he was named Deputy to the Assistant Secretary of State for Economic Affairs. In August of that year he became Deputy Director of the State Department's policy planning staff, and was appointed Director the following year. As Director, Nitze was the principal author of a highly influential National Security Council document (NSC-68), which provided the strategic outline for increased U.S. expenditures to counter the threat of the Soviet armament. From 1953 to 1961, Nitze served as President of the Foreign Service Educational Foundation while concurrently serving as an Associate of the Washington Center of Foreign Policy Research and The School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS) of Johns Hopkins University. His publications during this period include "U.S. Foreign Policy: 1945-1955." In 1961 President Kennedy appointed Nitze Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs and in 1963 he became the Secretary of the Navy, serving until 1967. Following his term as Secretary of the Navy, he served as Deputy Secretary of Defense from 1967 to 1969, as a member of the U.S. delegation to the Strategic Arms Limitation Talks (SALT) from 1969 to 1973 and as Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Affairs from 1973 to 1976. Later, fearing Soviet rearmament, he opposed the ratification of the SALT II treaty in 1979. He was President Reagan's chief negotiator of the Intermediate Range Nuclear Forces (INF) treaty between 1981 and 1984. In 1984, Nitze was named Ambassador-at-Large and Special Advisor to the President and Secretary of State on Arms Control. For more than forty years, Nitze was one of the chief architects of U.S. policy toward the Soviet Union. President Reagan awarded Nitze the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 1985 for his contributions to the freedom and security of the United States. This is the nation's highest civilian honor. In 1989, he returned to his office at SAIS, now renamed the Paul H. Nitze School of International Studies. Paul H. Nitze told the story of his extraordinary life in the memoir Hiroshima to Glasnost, and shared his observations on a lifetime in public service in the book Tension Between Opposites: Reflections on the Practice and Theory of Politics. He died on October 19, 2004 at age 97. At his funeral service in Washington National Cathedral, his coffin was carried by eight crew members of the USS Nitze DDG-94, one of the very few ships in the U.S. Navy ever to be named for a living person.Robert M. Cieri/Bill Gonyo
Nitze 49kArtist's conception of the Nitze as built by the renowned graphic illustrator John Barrett with the text written by naval author and historian Robert F. Sumrall. Their company Navy Yard Associates offers prints of most destroyers, destroyer escorts, submarines and aircraft carriers in various configurations during the ship's lifetime. The prints can be customized with ship's patches, your photograph, your bio, etc. If you decide to purchase artwork from them please indicate that you heard about their work from NavSource.Navy Yard Associates
Nitze 62kPentagon, Arlington, Va. (Jan. 10, 2001) -- Former Secretary of the Navy Paul H. Nitze (right) and Secretary of Defense William S. Cohen look at a model of an Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer at a Pentagon press conference, following the announcement that a destroyer will be named in honor of Nitze. USS Nitze (DDG 94), which is due to join the fleet in 2004, is a multi-mission ship equipped with the Navy's AEGIS combat weapons system, and operates in support of carrier battle groups, surface action groups, and amphibious groups. Guided missile destroyers primarily perform anti-submarine, anti-air and anti-surface warfare roles. DoD photo by R. D. Ward.Fabio Peña
Nitze 160kAn artist's rendering of USS Nitze DDG-94 underway.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 224kA sign announcing the keel laying of the USS Nitze (DDG-94) on display at the Bath Iron Works Company Shipyard, located in Bath, Maine (ME). Photo by Bath Iron Works, Sep 20 2002.Bill Gonyo
Nitze 117kPCU Momsen DDG-92 (in the water), PCU Bainbridge DDG-96 (closest to Momsen) and PCU Nitze DDG-94 (on the right) at Bath Iron Works.Rexford Dundon
Nitze 76kUnder construction, August 9 2003.Chester O. Morris
Nitze 174kPort bow view of the USS Nitze (DDG-94) underway in the Atlantic Ocean on the builder's sea trials, DN-SD-06-07548Bill Gonyo
Nitze 108kChristening ceremony pamphlet.Steven A. Cardali
Nitze 41kNewspaper photo of Secretary Nitze at the Christening ceremony in Bath, Maine April 17, 2004.Chester O. Morris
Nitze 98kNewspaper photo of the Christening ceremony at Bath, Maine April 17, 2004.Chester O. Morris
Nitze 97kOn Saturday, April 17, 2004 NITZE was christened by the ship's sponsor Elisabeth "Leezee" Scott Porter, when she smashed a bottle of champagne against the Bath Iron Works Hull #476.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 201kThe Nitze Family at the Christening Ceremony. Ambassador Nitze with his wife, "Leezee" Porter and the ship's matrons, daughters Erin Lee Porter and granddaughter Phyllis Thompson Reed.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 42kIn drydock April 2004.Steven A. Cardali
Nitze 44kIn drydock April 2004.Steven A. Cardali
Nitze 168k040930-N-0295M-002. Washington, D.C., September 30 2004, from left, Cmdr. Michael Hegarty, Former Secretary of the Navy Paul H. Nitze, and Lt. Cmdr. Steve H. Murray, pose after Hegarty was presented a Bronze Star at a ceremony held at the U.S. Navy Memorial in Washington, D.C. Cmdr. Hegarty was recognized for personally developing port and river operation plans for Umm Qasr, Iraq, ensuring proper management of facilities and rivers to move vital humanitarian assistance, reconstruction and military supplies during Operation Iraqi Freedom (OIF). Hegarty is the prospective commanding officer of the guided missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94), which will be commissioned in March 2005. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Daniel J. McLain.Bill Gonyo
Nitze 20kInvitation to the Commissioning Ceremony at Norfolk, March 5 2005.Wendell R McLaughlin Jr
Nitze 74kThe Commissioning Program of USS Nitze DDG-94, which took place at Norfolk Virginia on March 5, 2005. NITZE is the 44th Aegis Destroyer and the 16th of the Flight IIA variant.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 117kCrew goes aboard during Commissioning Ceremony at Norfolk, March 5 2005.USN
Nitze 100kAnother view of the Commissioning Ceremony at Norfolk, March 5 2005.Jack Treutle
Nitze 100kAnother view of the Commissioning Ceremony at Norfolk, March 5 2005.Wendell R McLaughlin Jr
Nitze 97kAnother view of the Commissioning Ceremony at Norfolk, March 5 2005.Wendell R McLaughlin Jr
Nitze 123kGuided missile destroyers USS Paul Nitze (DDG-94) and USS Stout (DDG-55) moored pierside on the Elizabeth River, Norfolk, Virginia. Photo taken in 2006 by DeeAnne.Bill Gonyo
Nitze 102k060524-N-4936C-001. New York Harbor, May 24 2006, the guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) sails pass the Statue of Liberty in New York Harbor, headed for a Manhattan pier to participate in the 19th Annual Fleet Week New York City. Fleet Week has been sponsored by New York City since 1984 in celebration of the United States sea service. The annual event also provides an opportunity for citizens of New York City and the surrounding Tri-State area to meet Sailors, and Marines, as well as witness first hand the latest capabilities of today's Navy and Marine Corps team. Fleet week includes dozens of military demonstrations and displays, including public tours of many of the participating ships. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist Second Class David P. Coleman.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 104k060524-N-9640H-007. New York Harbor, May 24 2006, a New York City fireboat escorts the guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) as it sails up the Hudson River during Fleet Week New York 2006, parade of ships. Fleet Week has been sponsored by New York City since 1984 in celebration of the United States sea service. The annual event also provides an opportunity for citizens of New York City and the surrounding Tri-State area to meet Sailors, and Marines, as well as witness first hand the latest capabilities of todayUs Navy and Marine Corps team. Fleet week includes dozens of military demonstrations and displays, including public tours of many of the participating ships. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Gabriela Hurtado.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 103k061029-N-8154G-192. Atlantic Ocean, October 29 2006, the guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) steams through the Atlantic Ocean. Nitze is underway to assist the USS Bataan Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG) during their Composite Training Unit Exercise (COMPTUEX). The Bataan ESG is off the coast with the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit, based out of Camp Lejeune, N.C., prior to an upcoming regularly scheduled deployment. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeremy L. Grisham.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 112kUSS Nitze (DDG-94) at Valletta Port, Malta for a short visit January 18 2007.Anthony Vella
Nitze 116kAs above.Anthony Vella
Nitze 103k070703-N-6403R-002. Norfolk, Va., July 3 2007 the guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) pulls into port at Naval Station Norfolk after a six-month deployment as part of Bataan Expeditionary Strike Group (ESG). The ESG supported maritime operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the 5th and 6th Fleet areas of operation. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Joshua T. Rodriguez.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 97k080328-N-2838C-029. Atlantic Ocean, March 27 2008, the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71), the Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Supply (T-AOE 6) and the guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) sail side-by-side during a replenishment-at-sea (RAS). Roosevelt and embarked Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 8 are conducting tailored ship's training availability and final evaluation problem. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael D. Cole.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 108k080328-N-2838C-020. Atlantic Ocean, March 28 2008, the guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) steams off the coast of Florida. Nitze is conducting group sail operations. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Michael D. Cole.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 121kUSNS Supply (AOE-6) steams between USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN-71) and the guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG-94) while conducting a replenishment at sea (RAS) in the Atlantic Ocean, 28 March 2008. US Navy photo # 080328-N-2838C-032, Atlantic Ocean by MC2 Michael D. Cole.Lee Wahler
Nitze 56k080502-N-7571S-002. Pacific Ocean, May 2 2008, the guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) maneuvers to come along side the nuclear-powered aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt (CVN 71) to conduct a refueling-at-sea during a composite training unit exercise. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jonathan Snyder.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 151k080521-N-3088S-003. New York Harbor, May 21 2008, the guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) passes by the Statue of Liberty during the parade of ships on opening day of Fleet Week 2008 in New York. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Todd A. Stafford.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 165k080523-N-8907D-011, Staten Island, NY, May 23 2008, the guided-missile cruiser USS Monterey (CG 61), and the guided-missile destroyers USS Nitze (DDG 94) and USS The Sullivans (DDG 68) are moored beside the museum and display ship USS Intrepid, which is undergoing repairs at Staten Island for Fleet Week 2008. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class David Danals.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 174k080720-N-2908M-123. Atlantic Ocean, July 20 2008, the guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) conducts a test-fire of a 5-in Mk 45 Mod 2 gun. Nitze and the Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group are participating in Joint Task Force Exercise "Operation Brimstone" off the Atlantic coast until the end of July. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Joshua S. Mann.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 89k080912-N-1688B-065. Norfolk, Va., September 12 2008, family members of Sailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) watch from the pier as the ship leaves for a scheduled deployment. Nitze is part of the Theodore Roosevelt Carrier Strike Group supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 5th and 6th Fleet areas of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Matthew Bookwalter.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 181kA series of 25 images of a tour aboard the Nitze.Daniel Cascaddan
Nitze 174kAs above.Daniel Cascaddan
Nitze 158kAs above.Daniel Cascaddan
Nitze 168kAs above.Daniel Cascaddan
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Nitze 93kAs above.Daniel Cascaddan
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Nitze 263kAs above.Daniel Cascaddan
Nitze 135kAs above.Daniel Cascaddan
Nitze 135kAs above.Daniel Cascaddan
Nitze 204kAs above.Daniel Cascaddan
Nitze 123kAs above.Daniel Cascaddan
Nitze 79kA series of 23 images of the Nitze taken October 12 2009 at NOB Norfolk.Duane Curtis
Nitze 123kAs above.Duane Curtis
Nitze 124kAs above.Duane Curtis
Nitze 116kAs above.Duane Curtis
Nitze 35kAs above.Duane Curtis
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Nitze 92kAs above.Duane Curtis
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Nitze 90kAs above.Duane Curtis
Nitze 174kEnsign Rhett Begley (Class of 2008) was assigned as the Surface Warfare Officer aboard the USS Nitze (DDG-94). Photo courtesy of the U.S. Naval AcademyBill Gonyo
Nitze 122kAlexandria Division, US Naval Sea Cadet Corps aboard USS Nitze during New York Fleet week.LCDR Vinson Nash, NSCC
Nitze 136k110730-N-ZZ999-006. Atlantic Ocean, July 30 2011, sailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) perform a recoverable exercise torpedo (REXTORP) fire exercise. REXTORP is a launch and recovery exercise using a dummy torpedo. U.S. Navy photo.Bill Gonyo
Nitze 204k120402-N-WO496-038. Mediterranean Sea, April 2 2012, aircraft carrier USS Enterprise (CVN 65), left, Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Supply (T-AOE 6) and Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyers USS Nitze (DDG 94) and USS James E. Williams (DDG 95) conduct a replenishment at sea. The ships were deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to support maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Alex R. Forster, USN.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 149kThe guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG-94) transits the Strait of Hormuz on 19 May 2012 with Military Sealift Command missile range instrumentation ship USNS Invincible (T-AGM 24) and British Royal Navy ships HMS Ramsey (M110), HMS Pembroke (M107) and RFA Lyme Bay (L3007). Nitze is deployed as part of the Enterprise Carrier Strike Group to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility conducting maritime security operations, theater security cooperation efforts and support missions as part of Operation Enduring Freedom. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Jeff Atherton. Navy News Service # 120519-N-AP176-039.Robert Hurst
Nitze 136k121015-N-JV638-011. October 15 2012, Nitze alongside the USS Enterprise (CVAN-65).David A. Jones LS1(SW)
Nitze 189k140310-N-ZZ999-006. Port Louis, Mauritius, March 10 2014, the guided-missile destroyer USS Nitze (DDG 94) pulls alongside a tugboat as the ship prepares to moor for a scheduled port visit in Port Louis, Mauritius. Nitze is on a scheduled deployment supporting maritime security operations and theater security cooperation efforts in the U.S. 6th Fleet area of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Lt. j.g. Tyler Hammett.Robert M. Cieri
Nitze 7kShip's patch.Steven A. Cardali
Nitze 67kShip's patch.Mike Smolinski

USS NITZE DDG-94 History
Note: History is unavailable at this time
This ship was built too late to be covered by the DANFS project

Commanding Officers
Thanks to Wolfgang Hechler & Ron Reeves

CDR Michael Alan Hegarty    Mar 5 2005 - Jun 15 2006
CDR Robert Nicholas Hein Jr.    Jun 15 2006 - Dec 17 2007
CDR Kenneth S. Long    Dec 17 2007 - Jun 22 2009
CDR Richard Douglas Brawley    Jun 22 2009 - May 1 2011
CDR Christopher Alan Nerad    May 1 2011 - Nov 15 2012
CDR John L. Bub    Nov 15 2012 - present

Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
USS Nitze (DDG-94) website
Tin Can Sailors Website
Destroyer History Foundation
Destroyers Online Website
Official U.S.Navy Destroyer Website

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