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USS SAMPSON (DDG-102)

CLASS - BURKE Flight IIa As Built.
Displacement 8373 Tons (Full), Dimensions, 509' 5" (oa) x 66' 11" x 20' (Max)
Armament 1 x 5"/62 RF, Evolved Sea Sparrow Missile (ESSM), 96 VLS Cells,
2 SH-60B helicopters, 8 Harpoon Missiles, 6 x 12.75" TT.
Machinery, 100,000 SHP; 4 GE LM-2500 Gas Turbines, 2 screws
Speed, 30+ Knots, Range 4400 NM@ 20 Knots, Crew 370.
Operational and Building Data
Laid down March 19 2005 at Bath Iron Works
Christened September 16 2006 at Bath, Maine
Commissioned November 3 2007 at Boston, MA
Active unit of the US Navy
Homeported at San Diego, CA

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Sampson 12kRear Admiral William T. Sampson, born at Palmyra, New York , February 9, 1840. Appointed to the United States Naval Academy September 24, 1857, and graduated at the head of his class in 1861. He subsequently earned an LLD degree from Harvard in 1899. He was promoted to Master, 1861 and commissioned as a Lieutenant July 16, 1862. He was Executive Officer on the ironclad USS Patapsco when it was blown up by mine in Charleston harbor. He was blown into water, but then rescued. Advanced to Lieutenant Commander, July 25, 1866, Commander, August 9, 1874, Captain, March 1889. He was Superintendent of the Naval Academy, 1886-90. An expert on ordnance, torpedoes, etc. With Lieutenant Joseph Strauss, he devised-perfected superimposed turrets introduced into the Navy in February 1898. He was President, Board of Inquiry as to cause of the destruction of the USS Maine in Havana Harbor, February 15, 1898, and after a declaration of war with Spain he commanded the North Atlantic Squadron with the rank of acting Rear Admiral. Promoted to Commodore, 1898, Rear Admiral, 1899. During the Spanish-American his command numbered 125 vessels, the strongest ever organized for hostile purposes. His fleet captured many Spanish merchant vessels and blockade runners and finally defeated the Spanish fleet under Admiral Cevera. Appointed, September 1898, one of three commanders to Cuba. Resumed command of North Atlantic fleet, December 1898. Commandant, Boston USN Yard, Oct 14, 1899. In 1865-67 he served on the USS Colorado in European Squadron, advancing to Lieutenant Commander, July 1866. Again at USNA 1868-71, and, after service on the USS Congress in 1872 and European station in 1873 and promotion to Commander in August 1874, he returned for third tour, 1874-78, as head of Physics Department. 1879-82 he commanded USS Swatara in the Asiatic Squadron, after 2 years as Assistant Superintendent of the Naval Observatory in Washington, DC, during which time was delegate to International Prime Meridian Conference, October 1884, he commanded the Naval torpedo station at Newport from 1884 to 1886. September 1886 named Superintendent of the Naval Academy. Promoted to Captain in March 1889, he left the Academy in 1890 to command the USS San Francisco. 1893-97 he was Chief of the Bureau of Ordnance, where under his leadership much progress was made in such matters as introduction of smokeless powder and improvement of gunnery training. June 1897 given command of new battleship Iowa, joining the North Atlantic Squadron as senior Captain. During February-March 1898 served as president of the Naval Board investigating the sinking of the Maine in Havana harbor. In the latter month he was advanced to acting Rear Admiral, and named to succeed the ailing Montgomery Sicard in command of the North Atlantic Squadron. On declaration of war against Spain in April, he proceeded from Key West to institute a blockade of northern coast of Cuba, his own plan to attack Havana directly having been overruled by the Navy Department. In May while location of the Spanish fleet under Admiral Cevera was yet unknown, he made a cruise east to Puerto Rico and on May 12 bombarded San Juan. He then returned to blockade and joined by "Flying Squadron" under Winfield Scott Schley, who, though technically his senior, was placed under his command for the campaign. He sent Schley to reinforce the blockade of the southern coast, particularly at Cienfuegos and Santiago. Schley was tardy in movements, and Cevera slipped undetected into easily defended harbor at Santiago. When he was finally discovered there, Sampson concentrated his forces outside the harbor. He supported landing of Shafter's army at Daiquiri, June 22, and the capture of Siboney next day, and the subsequent advance to Santiago. Following capture of San Juan heights commanding the city on July 1 he and Shafter arranged a shore conference to plan a coordinated land-sea assault. On morning of July 3 aboard the USS New York, headed for the conference point some miles to east. Half an hour later the first of Cevera's ships appeared, steaming out of harbor to west. The Blockade Squadron, under the immediate command of Schley, went instantly into action and in less than 4 hours entire Spanish fleet was sunk or run ashore. The battle took place entirely to west of harbor entrance, and the New York was out of it altogether. Considerable controversy ensued, with Schley, who had been present aboard the USS Brooklyn, quickly becoming hero of day in papers, while the Navy Department and most knowledgeable observers credited Sampson's training, preparation, and standing orders with the squadron's success. A dispute, bitter at times, delayed promotions for both men for nearly a year. During September-December 1898 in Cuba as 1 of 3 US commissioners. He was made permanent Rear Admiral in March , and resumed command of his squadron until October 1899. He commanded the Boston Navy Yard until October 1901, waiting orders from then until hie retirement, February 1902. He died on May 6, 1902, at Washington, DC and it was originally suggested that he be buried at the Naval Academy. He was, however, subsequently buried in Section 21 of Arlington National Cemetery.Steven A. Cardali
Sampson 49kArtist's conception of the Sampson as built by the renowned graphic illustrator John Barrett with the text written by naval author and historian Robert F. Sumrall. Their company Navy Yard Associates offers prints of most destroyers, destroyer escorts, submarines and aircraft carriers in various configurations during the ship's lifetime. The prints can be customized with ship's patches, your photograph, your bio, etc. If you decide to purchase artwork from them please indicate that you heard about their work from NavSource.Navy Yard Associates
Sampson 127kKeel laying ceremony for the USS Sampson (DDG-102), March 24 2005. Photos by Dave BrandtBill Gonyo
Sampson 132kA series of photos of the Sampson under construction at Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine in 2005.Clint Ellis
Sampson 107kAs above.Clint Ellis
Sampson 63kAs above.Clint Ellis
Sampson 58kAs above.Clint Ellis
Sampson 90kAs above.Clint Ellis
Sampson 91kAs above.Clint Ellis
Sampson 48kThree views of the Sampson under construction at Bath in August 2006.Clint Ellis
Sampson 112kAs above.Clint Ellis
Sampson 110kAs above.Clint Ellis
Sampson 101kThe PCU Sampson (DDG-102) in the Kennebec River for its christening ceremony.Bill Gonyo
Sampson 114kTwo views from the Christening ceremony of September 16 2006. The sponsor was Ms Clare Parsons, RADM Sampsonís Great-Grand-daughter.Clint Ellis
Sampson 99kAs above.Clint Ellis
Sampson 83kThe launching at Bath.Dick Hart
Sampson 106kAs above.Dick Hart
Sampson 86kA series of 5 views from Sampson's sea trials, April 24 2007.GSMC (SW) Clint Ellis
Sampson 60kAs above.GSMC (SW) Clint Ellis
Sampson 113kAs above.GSMC (SW) Clint Ellis
Sampson 130kAs above.GSMC (SW) Clint Ellis
Sampson 122kAs above.GSMC (SW) Clint Ellis
Sampson 83kOn sea trials.Bill Gonyo
Sampson 102kThe sail away from Bath Iron Works.Dot Kelly
Sampson 123kThe sail away from Bath Iron Works.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 46kA series of 4 views from Sampson's commissioning November 3 2007 at Boston, MA by Kevin Hearn.Richard Leonhardt
Sampson 109kAs above.Richard Leonhardt
Sampson 92kAs above.Richard Leonhardt
Sampson 99kAs above.Richard Leonhardt
Sampson 132k071103-N-9909C-008. Boston, November 3 2007, sailors man the rails aboard guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) during the ship's commissioning ceremony. Sampson is the fourth ship named for Rear Adm. William T. Sampson, a naval hero during the Spanish-American War. U.S. Navy photo by Cmdr. Jane Campbell.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 146k071103-N-9909C-001. Boston, November 3 2007, members of the 101st Field Artillery Battalion of the Massachusetts Army National Guard provide the gun salute for the commissioning of USS Sampson (DDG 102). U.S. Navy photo by Cmdr. Jane Campbell.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 114k071103-N-9909C-006. Boston, November 3 2007, Vice Adm. William D. Sullivan, the U. S. Military Representative to NATO, hands the long glass to Ensign Christina Douglas to set the first watch aboard USS Sampson (DDG 102). Sullivan, who served as the decommissioning commanding officer 16 years ago for the last USS Sampson (DDG 10), was the principal speaker at the commissioning ceremony for USS Sampson (DDG 102). U.S. Navy photo by Cmdr. Jane Campbell.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 93kCover of the commissioning program.Bill Gonyo
Sampson 208kThe USS Bunker Hill (CG-52) and the USS Sampson (DDG-102) are undergoing a maintenance period in San Diego on July 22, 2008. Photo courtesy of Tom Saint.Bill Gonyo/Jerry Graham
Sampson   Sampson   Sampson   Sampson
Sampson   Sampson   Sampson   Sampson
Change of Command pamphlet - November 24 2008
ENS Christina Douglas, USS Sampson (DDG-102)
Sampson 145k090804-N-3038W-242. Pacific Ocean, August 4 2009, the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) is currently underway for a scheduled Pacific Deployment in support of Maritime Strategy. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class John Philip Wagner, Jr.Bill Gonyo
Sampson 124k091104-N-3038W-340. Gulf of Oman, November 4 2009, two MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopters assigned to the Wildcards of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 23 transfer supplies to the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) as the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) transits into position for a replenishment at sea (RAS) with the Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Bridge (T-AOE 10). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is on a routine deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class John Phillip Wagner Jr.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 123k091104-N-3038W-462. Gulf of Oman, November 4 2009, the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) transits away from the Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Bridge (T-AOE 10) after completing a replenishment at sea (RAS) alongside the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is on a routine deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class John Phillip Wagner Jr.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 87k091112-N-3038W-221. Gulf of Oman, November 12 2009, the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) steams into position for a replenishment at sea (RAS) with the Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Bridge (T-AOE-10). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is on a routine deployment in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class John Phillip Wagner Jr.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 104k091217-N-8421M-008. North Arabian Sea, December 17 2009, the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) is underway in the North Arabian Sea supporting Operation Enduring Freedom with the Nimitz Carrier Strike Group in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class David Mercil.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 165k091218-N-8421M-047. North Arabian Sea, December 18 2009, the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) operates in the North Arabian Sea supporting Operation Enduring Freedom with the Nimitz Carrier Strike Group. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class David Mercil.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 183k100106-N-8273J-122. North Arabian Sea, January 6 2010, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Gary Roughead, middle, visits with Sailors on the bridge of the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102). Roughead is in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility meeting with senior leadership. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tiffini Jones Vanderwyst.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 172k100106-N-8273J-145. North Arabian Sea, January 6 2010, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Gary Roughead, left, answers questions from Sailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102). Roughead is in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility meeting with senior leadership. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tiffini Jones Vanderwyst.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 185k100106-N-8273J-252. North Arabian Sea, January 6 2010, Chief of Naval Operations (CNO) Adm. Gary Roughead, left, visits with Sailors on the bridge aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102). Roughead is in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility meeting with senior leadership. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Tiffini Jones Vanderwyst.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 136k100114-N-2600H-187. North Arabian Sea, January 14 2010, the Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Bridge (T-AOE 10) performs a replenishment at sea with the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampsom (DDG 102), left, and the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is on a scheduled deployment in the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Matthew A. Hepburn.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 134k100114-N-2600H-119. North Arabian Sea, January 14 2010, sailors aboard the Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Bridge (T-AOE 10) attach cargo to an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Wildcards of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 23 while the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) operates astern. HSC-23 is embarked aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68). The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is on a routine deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Matthew A. Hepburn.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 135k100114-N-3038W-327. North Arabian Sea, January 14 2010, the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) and an MH-60S Sea Hawk helicopter assigned to the Wildcards of Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 23 embarked aboard the aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) operate during a replenishment at sea. The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is on a routine deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class John Philip Wagner Jr.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 125k100114-N-3038W-867. North Arabian Sea, January 14 2010, the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) cruises away from the Military Sealift Command fast combat support ship USNS Bridge (T-AOE 10) after completing a replenishment at sea. The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is on a routine deployment to the U.S. 5th Fleet area of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class John Philip Wagner Jr.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 152k100215-N-8421M-071. South China Sea, February 15 2010, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Sampson (DDG 102) and USS Pinckney (DDG 91) operating together. The ships are part of the Nimitz Carrier Strike Group, which is conducting operations in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. US Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class David Mercil.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 137k100215-N-3038W-257. February 15 2010, Oliver Hazard Perry-class guided-missile frigate USS Rentz (FFG 46), Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyers USS Pinkney (DDG 91) and USS Sampson (DDG 102), Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser USS Chosin (CG 65), and aircraft carrier USS Nimitz (CVN 68) operate in formation, in the South China Sea. The Nimitz Carrier Strike Group is conducting operations in support of maritime strategy in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class John Philip Wagner Jr.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 143kPhilippine Sea, March 7 2010, the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) maneuvers in the Philippine Sea. Sampson is deployed to the western Pacific region. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class John Philip Wagner Jr.Bill Gonyo
Sampson 191k100603-N-7783B-002. Portland, Ore., June 3 2010, sailors man the rails aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) as the ship arrives to participate in Portland Fleet Week festivities during the city's 103rd annual Rose Festival. Navy warships have been coming to the City of Roses since USS Charleston's visit in 1907, and are considered a highlight of the festival. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Thomas J. Brennan.Bill Gonyo
Sampson 163k100603-N-2143T-004. Portland, OR, June 3 2010, sailors man the rails aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) as she arrives to help celebrate Portland Fleet Week festivities during the city's 103rd annual Rose Festival. Navy warships have been coming to the City of Roses since USS Charleston's visit in 1907, and are considered a highlight of the festival. Assisting Sampson is the Foss tug Pacific Escort. US Navy photo by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Maebel Tinoko.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 163kThe guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG-102) pulls into Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii, on 24 June 2010 to support Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 exercises. RIMPAC is a biennial, multinational exercise designed to strengthen regional partnerships and improve multinational interoperability. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jon Dasbach. Navy News Service # 100624-N-6854D-908.Robert Hurst
Sampson 153k100707-N-4400J-054. Pearl Harbor, July 7 2010, a mooring line released by Sailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) splashes into the water before being recovered by Sailors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Benfold (DDG 65) as Benfold pulls away to join maritime exercises as part Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 exercises. RIMPAC is a biennial, multinational exercise designed to strengthen regional partnerships and improve multinational interoperability. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Keith E. Jones.Bill Gonyo
Sampson 157k100707-N-6854D-001. Pearl Harbor, July 7 2010, the Arleigh Burk-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) departs Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam to support Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 exercises. RIMPAC is a biennial, multinational exercise designed to strengthen regional partnerships and improve multinational interoperability. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jon Dasbach.Bill Gonyo
Sampson 168kThe guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG-102), the frigate USS Ford (FFG-54) and the U.S. Coast Guard high endurance cutter USCG Rush (WHEC-723) transit the Pacific Ocean on 24 July 2010 as part the Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 combined task force. RIMPAC, the world's largest multinational maritime exercise, is a biennial event which allows participating nations to work together to build trust and enhance partnerships needed to improve maritime security. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Joseph M. Buliavac. Image # 100724-N-3659B-222. Navy News Service.Robert Hurst
Sampson 128k100731-N-6854D-111. Pearl Harbor, July 31 2010, the Arleigh Burke-class guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) returns to Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam after participating in Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2010 exercises. RIMPAC is a biennial, multinational exercise designed to strengthen regional partnerships and improve multinational interoperability. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jon Dasbach.Bill Gonyo
Sampson 126k101116-N-6552M-012. Pacific Ocean, November 16 2010, the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102), left, rendezvouses with amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4) during a fueling-at-sea exercise off the coast of California. Boxer was participating in Composite Training Unit Exercise in preparation for a deployment.US Navy photo by MC2 Christopher Menzie.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 143k101116-N-1722W-071. Pacific Ocean, November 16 2010, the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4), right, transfers fuel to the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102), during a replenishment-at-sea (RAS) off the coast of California. Boxer was participating in a composite training unit exercise in preparation for a deployment. U.S. Navy photo by MCSN Trevor Welsh.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 155k101116-N-1722W-077. Pacific Ocean, November 16 2010, the amphibious assault ship USS Boxer (LHD 4), right, transfers fuel to the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) during a replenishment-at-sea (RAS) off the coast of California. SAMPSON is seen in a port bow view. Boxer was participating in a composite training unit exercise in preparation for a deployment. US Navy photo by MCSN Trevor Welsh.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 142k120223-N-HF252-051. San Diego, February 23 2012, sailors salute the flag during morning colors aboard the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) at Naval Station San Diego. Sampson was departing for a scheduled six-month independent deployment to the western Pacific region and U.S. Central Command areas of responsibility. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Derek Stroop.Robert M. Cieri
Sampson 183k140622-N-VO234-015. Pacific Ocean, June 22 2014, the guided-missile destroyer USS Sampson (DDG 102) fires its MK 45 5-inch gun during a live-fire exercise. Sampson is en route to Hawaii for Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2014. Twenty-three nations, more than 40 ships and submarines, more than 200 aircraft and 25,000 personnel are participating in the biennial RIMPAC exercise from June 26 to Aug. 1. U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Conor Minto.Ron Reeves
Sampson 97kShip's patch.Clint Ellis
Sampson 54kShip's patch.Mike Smolinski

USS SAMPSON DDG-102 History
Note: History is unavailable at this time
This ship was built too late to be covered by the DANFS project

Commanding Officers
Thanks to Wolfgang Hechler & Ron Reeves

CDR Philip Hans Roos    Nov 3 2007 - Nov 24 2008
CDR Martin H. Hardy III    Nov 24 2008 - Aug 25 2010
CDR Christopher Dea Alexander    Aug 25 2010 - May 9 2012
CDR Dwayne Donald Ducommun    May 9 2012 - Nov 22 2013
CDR Steven M. Foley    Nov 22 2013 - present

Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
USS Sampson (DDG-102) website
Tin Can Sailors Website
Destroyer History Foundation
Destroyers Online Website
Official U.S.Navy Destroyer Website

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