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USS FAIRFAX (DD-93)


Flag Hoist/Radio Call Sign - NTN

CLASS - WICKES As Built.
Displacement 1,154 Tons, Dimensions, 314' 5" (oa) x 31' 8" x 9' 10" (Max)
Armament 4 x 4"/50, 2 x 1pdr AA (1 x 3"/23AA In Some Ships), 12 x 21" tt..
Machinery, 24,200 SHP; Geared Turbines, 2 screws
Speed, 35 Knots, Crew 103.
Operational and Building Data
Laid down by Mare Island Navy Yard on July 10 1917.
Launched December 15 1917 and commissioned April 6 1918.
Placed into reserve at Philadelphia in 1919.
Decommissioned at Philadelphia June 19 1922 and was berthed there
until recommissioned May 1 1930.
Decommissioned and transferred to Great Britain October 23 1940, Renamed HMS Richmond (G88).
Stricken January 8 1941.
To Soviet Union July 16 1944. Renamed Zhguchiy (Rus. "Tenacious").
Fate Returned to Great Britain June 23 1949 and broken up for scrap.

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Size Image Description Contributed
By And/Or Copyright
Fairfax 63kDonald McNeil Fairfax, born 10 March 1818 in Mt. Eagle, Va., entered the Navy as a midshipman 12 August 1837. As executive officer in San Jacinto, on 8 November 1861 he boarded the British SS Trent to remove Confederate commissioners after the ship had been stopped by his captain. His distinguished service in the Civil War included command of Cayuga, Nantucket, and Montauk. Rear Admiral Fairfax retired 30 September 1881, and died at Hagerstown, Md., 10 January 1894.Bill Gonyo
Fairfax 346kUndated, location unknown. Hanging out the wash.Ed Zajkowski
Fairfax 90kPhoto #: NH 70607, USS Fairfax (Destroyer # 93) being prepared for launching, at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, circa 15 December 1917. Courtesy of the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, 1970. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Fairfax 92kPhoto #: NH 54129, USS Fairfax (Destroyer # 93) ready for launching, at the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, 15 December 1917. The Sponsor, Mrs. H. George, is standing on the platform at the ship's bow, holding the christening bottle. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Fairfax 108kLaunching ceremonies at Mare Island for the USS Fairfax (DD 93) on December 15, 1917.Darryl Baker
Fairfax 52kCirca March-April 1918 prior to her camouflage paint scheme. Photo from the Universal Ship Cancellation SocietyBill Gonyo
Fairfax 121kUSS Fairfax (DD 93), SC 273 & SC 278 at outfitting berth at Mare Island on March 1, 1918.Darryl Baker
Fairfax 77kFairfax departing Mare Island in May 1918.Darryl Baker
Fairfax 96kAs above.Darryl Baker
Fairfax 91kPhoto #: NH 55612, USS Fairfax (Destroyer # 93) making smoke while steaming at 25 knots during trials in the San Francisco Bay area, 21 May 1918. Photographed by the Mare Island Navy Yard. Note the ship's pattern camouflage. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Joe Radigan
Fairfax 73kPhoto #: NH 54133, USS Fairfax (Destroyer # 93) at anchor in the San Francisco Bay area, 21 May 1918. Photographed by the Mare Island Navy Yard during the ship's trials. Note her pattern camouflage. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.USN
Fairfax 98kPhoto #: NH 23, USS Fairfax (Destroyer # 93) making smoke while running at 25 knots, during trials in the San Francisco Bay area, 21 May 1918. Photographed by the Mare Island Navy Yard. Note this ship's pattern camouflage. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Fairfax 69kPhoto #: NH 54130, USS Fairfax (Destroyer # 93) steaming at 25 knots while making no smoke, during trials in the San Francisco Bay area, 21 May 1918. Photographed by the Mare Island Navy Yard. Note the ship's pattern camouflage. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Fairfax 90kPhoto #: NH 2025, USS Fairfax (Destroyer # 93) at anchor in the San Francisco Bay area, 21 May 1918. Photographed by the Mare Island Navy Yard during the ship's trials. Note her pattern camouflage. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Fairfax 90kPhoto #: NH 54132, USS Fairfax (Destroyer # 93) at anchor in the San Francisco Bay area, 21 May 1918. Photographed by the Mare Island Navy Yard during the ship's trials. Note her pattern camouflage. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Fairfax 91kPhoto #: NH 54131, USS Fairfax (Destroyer # 93) at anchor in the San Francisco Bay area, 21 May 1918. Photographed by the Mare Island Navy Yard during the ship's trials. Note her pattern camouflage. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Fairfax 142kCamouflage plan dated August 9 1918.Darryl Baker
Fairfax 66kPhoto #: NH 103248, USS Fairfax (Destroyer # 93) underway, circa October 1918. Probably photographed from USS SC-331. Collection of George K. Beach. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Fairfax 40kPhoto #: NH 103247, USS Fairfax (Destroyer # 93) underway, photographed from USS Iowa (Battleship # 4), circa summer-fall 1918. Note that Fairfax' port side camouflage scheme is different from that applied when she was first completed. Collection of Commander Haines H. Lippincott, USN(ChC). U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Fairfax 71kPhoto #: NH 41728, Sinking of S.S. Lucia, 17 October 1918 motor launch from USS Huntington (Armored Cruiser # 5) leaving USS Fairfax (Destroyer # 93) with survivors from the American steamship Lucia. Fairfax is visible in the background. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Fairfax 55kPhoto #: NH 54134, USS Fairfax (Destroyer # 93) underway with the survivors of S.S. Lucia on board, circa 18 October 1918. They were later transferred to USS Huntington (Armored Cruiser # 5). Note Fairfax' pattern camouflage. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Fairfax 132kUSS Florida (BB-30) in port with the destroyer USS Fairfax (DD-93) sometime after 27 October 1918, when she arrived at Brest for patrol and escort duty in European waters.Scott Koen/ussnewyork.com
Fairfax 64kStarboard bow view of the USS Fairfax (DD-93) at sea sometime between 1919-1921. US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No.1984.041.001.053.Mike Green
Fairfax 54kBow view of USS Fairfax(DD-93) underway at sea sometime between 1919-1921. US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 1984.041.001.049.Mike Green
Fairfax 62kStarboard side view of the USS Fairfax (DD-93) underway at sea sometime between 1919-1921. US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 1984.041.001.052.Mike Green
Fairfax 108kPhoto #: NH 54136, USS Fairfax (Destroyer # 93) in harbor, circa late 1918 or early 1919. Photographed by Zimmer. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Fairfax 70kPhoto #: NH 54135, USS Fairfax (Destroyer # 93) view of the ship's forward and midships superstructure, probably taken at Brest, France, in late 1918. Photographed by Zimmer. Note the small identification number painted below her pilothouse, canvas weather screens, and the 1-pounder automatic anti-aircraft gun mounted by her forward smokestacks. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Fairfax 94kView of target practice on board the destroyer USS Fairfax (DD 93) in the waters off Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 1919. Image part of a photograph album containing images from the World War I era. Photo courtesy of the National Naval Aviation Museum.Bill Gonyo
Fairfax 76kPhoto #: NH 54137, USS Fairfax (Destroyer # 93) at anchor, 11 October 1919. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Fairfax 61kPhoto #: NH 67728, USS Fairfax (DD-93) at Poughkeepsie, New York, 17 June 1939. Courtesy of Donald M. McPherson, 1969. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Fairfax 322kPhoto #: NH 76141, Hiroshi Saito (1886-1939), late Japanese Ambassador to the United States. Page from the "Japan Times Weekly", published in Tokyo, 20 April 1939, page 523, with fine-screen halftone reproductions of photographs taken at the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, on 18 March 1939, as Ambassador Saito's remains were embarked on USS Astoria (CA-34) for return to Japan. He had died in Washington, D.C., on 26 February 1939. Astoria is seen in the lower photograph, as the launch Anita Clay approaches with Ambassador's Saito's remains on board. The destroyer in the background of the center photograph is USS Fairfax (DD-93). Donation of Lieutenant Gustave Freret, USN (Retired), 1972. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Fairfax 58kAnchored in the Hudson River in July 1940.Paul Rebold
On British Service
The RCN took custody of HMS Richmond at Halifax on 26 November 1940, and she commissioned on 5 December when her RN crew arrived, sailing for Devonport and refit on 19 December. Delayed at St. John's, NF, by defects, she arrived at Devonport on 1 February 1941; although completed and worked up by 16 March, a grounding at Holyhead while en route to Liverpool returned the ship for further repair at Southampton. HMS Richmond was allocated to NEF with 17th Escort Group when repairs were completed in early June 1941, escorting convoy WS9A for its first three days en route. Thereafter the ship was based at St. John's, NF, until returning to Cardiff for a long refit starting on 29 October 1941. On completion of a Tobermory work up, HMS Richmond joined 27th Escort Group based on the Clyde, her first task being to escort the initial stage of convoy PQ14 from the UK to Iceland, during which she collided with the American Francis Scott Keys. Damage was severe and, after being towed to Iceland for temporary repairs, she then had to be towed to Liverpool for repair. When the damage had been made good, and after a further work up, HMS Richmond was ordered to join the WLEF, arriving at Halifax on 1 September 1942. In February 1943 she was again in collision, with Reinholt, and again repaired at Liverpool from 18 February to 31 May 1943, prior to returning to Canada. HMS Richmond continued to be based at Halifax until December 1943, when she returned to Britain via Horta, arriving on the Tyne to lay up on 27 December 1943. Allocated to Russia in lieu of Italian tonnage, she was refitted by Palmers, who were similarly refitting HMS Chelsea, and became Zhivuchi on 16 July 1944 and passed to Kola for service with the Northern Fleet. She remained in Russian hands until 24 June 1949 when she returned to the RN at Rosyth, arriving at Grangemouth on 29 July 1949 to be broken up by G. & W. Brunton. (Foreign service history thanks to Robert Hurst.)
Fairfax 68kThe 'Town' class destroyer HMS Richmond (ex-USS Fairfax, DD-93) date and location unknown.Robert Hurst
Fairfax 74kHMS Richmond showing the aftermath of the collision with the Francis Scott Key on March 31 1942.Robert Hurst
On Soviet Service
Depending on the source her name is spelled Zhivuch or Zhivuchiy or Zhguchiy.
Fairfax 106kThe Soviet Union Zhguchiy (ex-HMS Richmond, ex-USS Fairfax) underway postwar towing a torpedo target. Undated, location unknown.Robert Hurst
Fairfax 80kUndated, location unknown.Igor Ageev

USS FAIRFAX DD-93 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry
(Located On The hazegray Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)

Commanding Officers
Thanks to Wolfgang Hechler & Ron Reeves

LCDR Stanford Caldwell Hooper    Apr 6 1918 - 1918 (Later RADM)
LCDR Willis Augustus (Ching) Lee Jr.    Sep 1920 - Jan 1921 (Later VADM)
LT Henry Mylin Kieffer    Jan 12 1921 - ?
LCDR Frank Alfred Braisted    Oct 1921 - Nov 1921 (Later RADM)
LCDR Edward Joseph O'Keefe    Jun 1 1929 - ?
LCDR Ellsworth Davis    ? 1934 - ?
LCDR Hugh Wilson Olds    ? 1936 - ?
LCDR Paul Luker Mather    ? 1939 - ? (Later RADM)

Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
Tin Can Sailors Website
Destroyer History Foundation
Destroyers Online Website
Official U.S.Navy Destroyer Website

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