NavSource Main Page FAQ Contact us Search NavSource

Waving US Flag

NavSource Naval History
Photographic History of the United States Navy
DESTROYER
ARCHIVE

USS CHAUNCEY (DD-296)

CLASS - CLEMSON As Built.
Displacement 1,215 Tons, Dimensions, 314' 5" (oa) x 31' 8" x 9' 10" (Max)
Armament 4 x 4"/50, 1 x 3"/23AA, 12 x 21" tt..
Machinery, 26,500 SHP; Geared Turbines, 2 screws
Speed, 35 Knots, Crew 114
Operational and Building Data
Laid down by Bethlehem Steel, San Francisco on June 17 1918.
Launched September 29 1918 and commissioned June 25 1919.
Wrecked on Honda Point Calif. September 8 1923.
Stricken November 20 1923.
Fate Wreck sold to Robert H. Smith of Oakland, California for $147.86 on October 29 1925.

Click On Image
For Full Size Image
Size Image Description Contributed
By
Chauncey 58kIsaac Chauncey, born in Black Rock, Conn., 20 February 1779, was appointed a Lieutenant in the Navy from 17 September 1798. He fought with gallantry in the West Indies during the Quasi-War with France; in the Mediterranean during the War with the Barbary Powers; and commanded John Adams (1804-5), Hornet (1805-6), Washington and the Mediterranean Squadron (1815-1820). Perhaps his most outstanding service was during the War of 1812 when he commanded the naval forces on Lake Ontario, conducting amphibious operations in cooperation with the Army, and containing the large British squadron stationed there. His last service was as member, and, for 4 years, President, of the Board of Navy Commissioners. Commodore Chauncey died in Washington 27 January 1840. Photo #: KN-10889. Commodore Isaac Chauncey, USN (1772-1840)oil on wood, 26" by 21.5", by Gilbert Stuart (1775-1828). Painted circa 1818. Painting in the U.S. Naval Academy Museum Collection. Transferred from the U.S. Naval Lyceum, 1892. Official U.S. Navy Photograph.Tony Cowart/Robert M. Cieri
Chauncey 98kUndated, location unknown. USS Renshaw (DD-176), USS Chauncey (DD-296), USS Hogan (DD-178) and USS O'Bannon (DD-177).Lynette Jeffres
Chauncey 51kUndated, location unknown.Robert M. Cieri
Chauncey 131kUndated, location unknown.Darryl Baker
Chauncey 206kUSS Chauncey (DD-296), USS Hart (DD-110) and USS Ludlow (DD-112) under construction in Hunters Point Dry Dock #3 on October 14 1918.Darryl Baker
Chauncey 118kUSS Chauncey (Destroyer # 296), Fitting out in Drydock # 3 at Hunters Point, San Francisco, California, on 14 October 1918. She had been launched a few weeks earlier. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph. Photo #: NH 69803.Robert Hurst
Chauncey 71kPhoto #: NH 69933-A, Commander William A. Glassford, Jr., USN, Commanding Officer of USS Chauncey (Destroyer # 296) and Commander Destroyer Division 32 stands by the steering wheel in his ship's pilot house, at the Mare Island Navy Yard, 1919. Note his binoculars and the World War I service chevrons on his uniform sleeve. Courtesy of the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, 1970. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Paul Rebold
Chauncey 135kCommander William A. Glassford, Jr., ship's Commanding Officer and Commander Destroyer Division 32 (seated, center) with Chauncey's officers, while she was at the Mare Island Navy Yard, 1919. Among the others present are: Lieutenant Commander Charles H. Ingraham, Executive Officer (seated, left); Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Thomas C. Macklin (standing, left) -- tentative identification; Lieutenant Allan P. Flagg (standing, 2nd from left); Gunner Joseph R. Ross (standing, right) -- tentative identification. Note that these men are wearing both the old and new style uniforms. Courtesy of the Mare Island Naval Shipyard, 1970. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Bill Gonyo
Chauncey 77kUSS Anthony (Destroyer # 172) At the Mare Island Navy Yard, California, on 27 June 1919, eight days after she went into commission. She is moored outboard of USS Chauncey (Destroyer # 296). U.S. Naval Historical Center PhotographFred Weiss
Chauncey 128kPhoto #: NH 55095: USS Chauncey (Destroyer # 296) photographed circa 1919. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Joe Radigan
Chauncey 75kPhoto #: NH 55094: USS Chauncey (Destroyer # 296) off the Mare Island Navy Yard, 8 July 1919. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fabio Peņa
Chauncey 93kPhoto #: NH 69803: USS Chauncey (Destroyer # 296) fitting out in Drydock # 3 at Hunters Point, San Francisco, California, on 14 October 1918. She had been launched a few weeks earlier. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fabio Peņa
Chauncey 64kDestroyers at San Diego, California, circa December 1919. These ships are, from left to right: USS O'Bannon (Destroyer # 177); USS Sproston (Destroyer # 173); USS Hogan (Destroyer # 178); USS Chauncey (Destroyer # 296); and USS Renshaw (Destroyer # 176). All were members of the 22nd Destroyer Division except Chauncey, which was then the only active member of the 32nd Destroyer Division. Note "Merry Christmas" sign and Christmas tree atop Renshaw's pilothouse. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Tony Cowart
Chauncey 102kUSS Birmingham (CL-2) leading destroyers out of a West Coast harbor (probably San Diego), circa 1919-1922. The ships directly behind her are USS Twiggs (DD-127) and USS Chauncey (DD-296). Courtesy of ESKC Joseph L. Aguillard, USNR, 1979. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fred Weiss
Chauncey 144kAerial view of the Honda Point disaster area September 8, 1923, showing all seven destroyers that ran aground on Honda Point during the night of 8 September 1923. Photographed from a plane assigned to USS Aroostook (CM-3). Ships are: USS Nicholas (DD-311), in the upper left; USS S.P. Lee (DD-310), astern of Nicholas; USS Delphy (DD-261), capsized in the left center; USS Young (DD-312), capsized in the center of the view; USS Chauncey (DD-296), upright ahead of Young; USS Woodbury (DD-309) on the rocks in the center; and USS Fuller (DD-297), in the lower center. The Southern Pacific Railway's Honda Station is in the upper left. Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of Admiral William V. Pratt.Fabio Peņa
Chauncey 68kPhoto #: NH 66723: Honda Point Disaster, September 1923 , aerial view of the disaster area, showing the seven destroyers that ran aground in a fog during the night of 8 September 1923. Photographed from a plane assigned to USS Aroostook (CM-3). Ships are: USS Nicholas (DD-311), in the left center; USS S.P. Lee (DD-310), astern of Nicholas; USS Delphy (DD-261), capsized in small cove (center); USS Young (DD-312), capsized in the center of the view; USS Chauncey (DD-296), upright ahead of Young; USS Woodbury (DD-309) on the rocks in the center; and USS Fuller (DD-297), closest to the camera. Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of Admiral William V. Pratt. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Joe Radigan
Chauncey 60kPhoto #: NH 42173: Honda Point disaster, September 1923, ships of Destroyer Squadron Eleven wrecked on the California coast, near the northern entrance of the Santa Barbara Channel, shortly after they ran aground in a fog during the night of 8 September 1923. The stern of USS Delphy (DD-261) is in the right foreground. At left is USS Chauncey (DD-296). Beyond her stern is the capsized USS Young (DD-312). USS Woodbury (DD-309) is on the rocks in the upper right, with USS Fuller (DD-297) partially visible behind her. Donation of BMGC Ralph E. Turpin, 1963. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fabio Peņa
Chauncey 102kPhoto #: NH 66720: Honda Point Disaster, September 1923, aerial view of the southern part of the disaster area, showing four of the seven destroyers that ran aground on Honda Point during the night of 8 September 1923. Photographed from a plane assigned to USS Aroostook (CM-3). Ships visible are USS Delphy (DD-261), capsized in the lower left; USS Chauncey (DD-296), upright beyond Delphy; USS Young (DD-312), capsized aft of Chauncey; and USS Woodbury (DD-309) at right. Point Arguello lighthouse is in the center distance. Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of Admiral William V. Pratt. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fabio Peņa
Chauncey 86kPhoto #: NH 84819: Honda Point Disaster, September 1923, wrecked destroyers on Honda Point, California, soon after the night of 8 September 1923, when they went ashore in a fog. In the foreground is USS Delphy (DD-261), which has broken in two, with her forward section capsized to port. At left, behind the rocky outcropping, is the stern of USS Chauncey (DD-296). USS Young (DD-312) is capsized to starboard, astern of Chauncey. In the distance is USS Woodbury (DD-309), heeled to port with her bow near a small rock island, with USS Fuller (DD-297) beyond her. Photograph by Aston. Donation of Captain George M. Grening, USN (Retired). U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fabio Peņa
Chauncey 84kPhoto #: NH 66722: Honda Point Disaster, September 1923, aerial view of the southern part of the disaster area, showing five of the seven destroyers that ran aground on Honda Point during the night of 8 September 1923. Photographed from a plane assigned to USS Aroostook (CM-3). Ships visible are: USS Delphy (DD-261), capsized in the small cove at left; USS Young (DD-312), capsized in left center; USS Chauncey (DD-296), upright ahead of Young; USS Woodbury (DD-309) on the rocks in the right center; and USS Fuller (DD-297) on the rocks at right. The Southern Pacific Railway's Honda Station is in the upper middle. Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of Admiral William V. Pratt. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fabio Peņa
Chauncey 99kPhoto #: NH 66723: Honda Point Disaster, September 1923, aerial view of the disaster area, showing the seven destroyers that ran aground in a fog during the night of 8 September 1923. Photographed from a plane assigned to USS Aroostook (CM-3). Ships are: USS Nicholas (DD-311), in the left center; USS S.P. Lee (DD-310), astern of Nicholas; USS Delphy (DD-261), capsized in small cove (center); USS Young (DD-312), capsized in the center of the view; USS Chauncey (DD-296), upright ahead of Young; USS Woodbury (DD-309) on the rocks in the center; and USS Fuller (DD-297), closest to the camera. Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of Admiral William V. Pratt. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fabio Peņa
Chauncey 84kPhoto #: NH 84821: Honda Point Disaster, September 1923, wrecked destroyers on Honda Point, California, soon after the night of 8 September 1923, when they went ashore in a fog. In the foreground is USS Chauncey (DD-296), with life rafts in the water alongside. USS Young (DD-312) is capsized astern of Chauncey. In the distance is USS Woodbury (DD-309), heeled to port with her bow near a small rock island. USS Fuller (DD-297) is barely visible behind that island. Photograph by Aston. Donation of Captain George M. Grening, USN (Retired). U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fabio Peņa
Chauncey 77kPhoto #: NH 97982: Honda Point Disaster, September 1923, wreck of USS Chauncey (DD-296) near shore, during salvage operations some time after 8 September 1923, when she went aground on Honda Point with six other destroyers. Sheer legs are rigged atop her galley deckhouse to assist in removing items from the ship. Her midships 4"/50 guns have already been sent ashore. The wreck of USS Woodbury (DD-309) is in the middle distance. Photographed by Sever. Collection of Lieutenant Kelly Green. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fabio Peņa
Chauncey 146kHonda Point Disaster, September 1923, from top to bottom the wrecks of the USS Fuller (DD-297), USS Woodbury (DD-309), USS Young (DD-312) and USS Chauncey (DD-296). Copyright Bunnell Photo Shop, San Diego, CA. From the collection of CPO A. F. Meehan USN (Ret.).Pam Mayfield
Chauncey 129kHonda Point Disaster, September 1923, from top to bottom the wrecks of the USS Woodbury (DD-309) and USS Chauncey (DD-296). Copyright Bunnell Photo Shop, San Diego, CA. From the collection of CPO A. F. Meehan USN (Ret.).Pam Mayfield
Chauncey 117kUSS Chauncey (DD-296) in the foreground, with USS Young (DD-312) capsized astern. USS Woodbury (DD-309) in the centre distance, with USS Fuller (DD-297) faintly visible behind her. Note the people on the rocky point at right. photographed by Aston. Donation of Captain George M. Grening, USN (Retired) Photo No NH 84822.Robert Hurst
Chauncey 47kUSS Chauncey (DD-296) at Pt. Honda.Paul Rebold
Chauncey 27kOne of the heroes of Honda, Chief Boatswain's Mate Arthur Peterson, who swam from the Young (DD-312) to the Chauncey (DD-296) to set up a line for his shipmates to ferry themselves across to the Chauncey which was is substantially better condition. Ultimately, 11 trips were made allowing nearly 70 sailors to escape the Young. He was recommended for a citation for his bravery.Bill Gonyo

USS CHAUNCEY DD-296 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry
(Located On The hazegray Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)

Commanding Officers
Thanks to Wolfgang Hechler & Ron Reeves

CDR William Alexander Glassford Jr.    Jun 25 1919 - Dec 4 1919 (Later VADM)
LT Allan Prescott Flagg    Dec 4 1919 - Jan 28 1922
LCDR Richard Henry Booth    Jan 28 1922 - Sep 8 1923

Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
Tin Can Sailors Website
Destroyer History Foundation
Destroyers Online Website
Official U.S.Navy Destroyer Website

Back To The Main Photo Index To The Destroyer Index Page


Comments and Suggestions about this page, E-mail DestroyerInfo
Problems and site related matters, E-mail Webmaster