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USS WINSLOW (DD-359 / AG-127)


Flag Hoist/Radio Call Sign - NEGM

CLASS - PORTER As Built.
Displacement 2597 Tons (Full), Dimensions, 381' (oa) x 37' x 13' (Max)
Armament 8 x 5"/38AA (4x2), 8 x 1.1" AA (2x4), 8 x 21" tt.(2x4).
Machinery, 50,000 SHP; New York Shipbuilding Turbines, 2 screws
Speed, 37 Knots, Range 6500 NM@ 12 Knots, Crew 194.
Operational and Building Data
Laid down by New York Shipbuilding December 18 1933.
Launched September 21 1936 and commissioned February 17 1937.
Reclassified AG-127 September 17 1945.
Decommissioned June 28 1950.
Stricken December 5 1957.
Fate Sold February 23 1959 and broken up for scrap.

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Winslow
Rear Admiral John A. Winslow




Winslow
Admiral Cameron McRae Winslow
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135k
Rear Admiral John A. Winslow, USN (1811-1873), was born in Wilmington, North Carolina, in 1811. He entered the Navy as a Midshipman in 1827, was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant in 1839 and to Commander in 1855. During the Mexican War, he was commended to gallantry for his activities at Tobasco. Soon after the outbreak of the Civil War, Commander Winslow was assigned as Executive Officer of the Western Gunboat Flotilla. He was injured while commanding the incomplete ironclad river gunboat Benton in the Fall of 1861 and spent several months recovering. Promoted to Captain in July 1862, Winslow returned to the Mississippi area for further service, but was detached late in the year. He took command of USS Kearsarge in April 1863. Over the next year and a half, Captain Winslow patrolled European waters in search of Confederate raiders, keeping his ship and crew well-prepared for combat. On 19 June 1864, he led them to victory in one of the Civil War's most notable naval actions, the battle between USS Kearsarge and CSS Alabama. Winslow was promoted to the rank of Commodore as a result of this action. He became a Rear Admiral in 1870 and commanded the Pacific Squadron from then until 1872. Rear Admiral John A. Winslow died on 29 September 1873, soon after retiring from active naval service.

Admiral Cameron McRae Winslow (29 July 1854 - 2 January 1932) served in the United States Navy during the Spanish-American War and World War I. A son of Commander Francis Winslow (I) (1818 - 1862), he was a first cousin once removed of Rear Admiral John A. Winslow, who served in the Civil War (Cameron's father, who also fought in the Civil War, and died of Yellow Fever in 1862 while in command of the USS R. R. Cuyler (1860), was a first cousin of John A. Winslow.) Cameron McRae Winslow was born in Washington, D.C.. His older brother was Lt. Francis Winslow (II) USN; his younger brother, Arthur Winslow, was the grandfather of the Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Robert Lowell. He graduated from the United States Naval Academy in 1874, after which followed years of extensive sea duty. During the 1898 war with Spain, then-Lieutenant Winslow served on board Nashville. He was commended for extraordinary heroism when, on 11 May 1898, he commanded a boat expedition from Nashville and Marblehead which succeeded in cutting two submarine cables off Cienfuegos, Cuba, which linked Cuba with Europe. Despite withering enemy fire from point-blank range, which resulted in a bullet wound to his hand, Winslow retained command throughout the engagement. Winslow commanded Charleston from 1905 to 1907 and battleship New Hampshire from 1908 to 1909. When the fleet returned to the US in 1909, Winslow and the New Hampshire joined the fleet for its formal military review before President Roosevelt. Promoted to rear admiral on 14 September 1911, Winslow was Commander in Chief, United States Pacific Fleet, from 13 September 1915 until 29 July 1916 when he was retired due to the statutory age limit. Recalled to active duty in World War I, he served as Inspector of Naval Districts on the Atlantic coast until again retiring on 11 November 1919. Following the 1908 death of his oldest brother, Lt. Francis Winslow (II) USN, Rear Admiral Winslow became a member of the Society of the Cincinnati in the State of New Hampshire, representing his direct ancestor Major General John Stark. The Admiral's younger brother, Arthur Winslow, also joined the Society, representing the General's oldest son, Major Caleb Stark. Rear Admiral Winslow died in Boston, Massachusetts. Winslow (DD-359).
Bill Gonyo
As DD-359
Winslow 111kUndated prewar photo of the destroyer leader Winslow with her tripod masts and twin 5" anti-ship guns. A.A. coverage is provided by two quadruple 1.1"/75 caliber mounts, one just forward of her bridge structure and one just forward of her aft guns.-
Winslow 94kUndated prewar image.Jesse P Mannix
Winslow 54kUndated, location unknown.Richard Evans
Winslow 31kUndated, location unknown.Pieter Bakels
Winslow 124kCirca 1938, location unknown. Image from the 1943-44 Edition of Jane's Fighting Ships.O.W. Waterman
Winslow 93kUSS Balch (DD-363), USS Moffett (DD-362), USS Winslow (DD-359), and USS McDougal (DD-358) (listed from bottom to top) moored together at San Diego, California, March 1939. A harbor oiler is alongside Balch, and what appears to be a garbage lighter is astern of the four destroyers. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.Fred Weiss
Winslow 95kUSS Winslow (DD-359), USS Balch (DD-363) and USS Selfridge (DD-357) (listed from left to right) Moored together in San Diego Harbor, California, during the later 1930s. Courtesy of BMGC Ralph E. Turpin, USNR, 1963. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fred Weiss
Winslow 150kUSS Winslow (DD-359) alongside pier at Rio De Janeiro, Brazil, circa December 1942. Source: United States Naval History and Heritage Command, Photo No. NH 59941.Mike Green
Winslow 127kUSS Winslow (DD-359) underway off Lakehurst, New Jersey on 15 November 1944. Note that this ship still carries four twin 5"/38 low-angle gun mounts. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives. Photo #: 80-G-289827.Robert Hurst
As AG-127
Winslow 74kUndated, location unknown.Robert Hurst
Winslow 45kUSS Winslow (AG-127) as experimental radar picket serving with the Operational Development Force, in Boston Harbor, May 20 1945.Robert Hurst
Winslow 187kUSS Winslow (AG-127) off the Charleston Navy Yard, South Carolina, about August 1945. Source: United States National Archives, Photo No. 19-N-86592.Mike Green
Winslow 76kView of the destroyer piers at Charleston Naval Shipyard between July 1950 and August 1954. Harrison (DD573), John Rodgers (DD574), Thorn (DD647), and Winslow (AG127) are identified. Photo from USNI collection.John Chiquoine
Winslow 66kWinslow (AG-127, ex-DD-359) being towed away for scrap in 1959.Robert Hurst

USS WINSLOW DD-359 / AG-127 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry
(Located On The hazegray Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)

Commanding Officers
Thanks to Wolfgang Hechler & Ron Reeves

CDR Irving Reynolds Chambers    Feb 17 1937 - Jun 9 1939
CDR Randall Eusta Dees    Jun 9 1939 - ?
CDR Harold Romeyn Holcomb    Jun 20 1941 - Jan 7 1942
LCDR William Jefferson Marshall    Jan 7 1942 - Jun 30 1942
LCDR Warren Porter Mowatt    Jun 30 1942 - Feb 12 1943
LT William Tindall Samuels    Feb 12 1943 - Mar 13 1943
LCDR Alexander Martin Kowalzyk Jr.    Mar 13 1943 - Nov 10 1943
LCDR  William Tindall Samuels    Nov 10 1943 - Jul 12 1945
LCDR John Paul Howatt    Jul 12 1945 - Jan 28 1947
As the AG-127
CDR Ben Brown Pickett    Jan 28 1947 - Jan 17 1948 (Later RADM)
CDR Thomas Starr King Jr.    Jan 17 1948 - Jul 1949

Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
Tin Can Sailors Website
Destroyer History Foundation
Destroyers Online Website
Official U.S.Navy Destroyer Website

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