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NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive

Salmon / D-3 (SS-19)


D Class Submarine: Laid down, 16 April 1908, at Fore River Shipbuilding Co., Quincy, MA.; Launched, 12 March 1910; Commissioned USS Salmon, 8 September 1910; Renamed USS D-3, 17 November 1911; Decommissioned and struck from the Naval Register, 31 July 1922, at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Philadelphia, PA.; Final Disposition, sold for scrapping, 31 July 1922.

Specifications: Displacement, surfaced 238 t., submerged 275 t.; Length 105' 4"; Beam 13' 11"; Draft 10' 7"; Speed, surfaced 10.5 kts, submerged 9 kts; Depth Limit 200'; Complement 1 Officer, 14 Enlisted; Armament, two 18" torpedo tubes, four torpedoes; Propulsion, gasoline electric, Craig Shipbuilding Co. gasoline engines, 250 hp, Fuel Capacity 1,880 gal., Electro Dynamic Co, electric motors, 150 hp, Battery Cells 60, single propeller.
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Unknown Photos 284k Sub D-3 (SS-19) launched in Fore River, 12 March 1910. Photo i.d. & text courtesy of Ric Hedman.
Photo courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
Unknown Photos 866k U.S. submarine torpedo boat D-3 (SS-19) just put into the water at Fore River Shipbuilding Co., Quincy,
Lack of leaves on trees, other D boats were launched later in the year, and the trees would have had foliage. No bow planes clinches it as a D class.
Photo i.d. & text courtesy of Ric Hedman.
Photo courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
SS-1937kD-3 (SS-19), the last of her class, introduced some features planned for the following E & F classes. Unlike the first two D-boats , she had only two bulkheads, one at the after end of the torpedo room and one at the fore end of the engine room. Pushing out the bulkheads left much more space in the control room (and thus simplified periscope arrangement), but it also made the compartments so large that the boat was unlikely to survive if any one of them was flooded. This decision, to arrange bulkheads for more efficient operation might explain why several U.S. subs were lost to collision during the 1920s.
Quite aside from simplifying internal arrangement, placing the two periscopes very close to each other made it possible to brace both against vibration, a very serious problem in the Octopus class.
The telescoping radio mast is visible at the other end of the conning tower fairwater. As in earlier E.B. designs, control rods for the planes and rudders were carried overhead, along the inside of the pressure hull. That is why the ship's wheel had to be suspended from the overhead, as is clear here, so it could connect to the appropriate rod.
Drawing by Jim Christley.
Photo & text courtesy of U.S. Submarines Through 1945, An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman. Naval Institute Press.
SS-13-1953k Navy submarines in port, circa 1909. Possibly photographed at the Fore River Shipyard, Quincy, Massachusetts, these submarines are (from left to right):
C-3 (SS-14);
either D-1 (SS-17);
or D-3 (SS-19);
C-5 (SS-16);
C-2 (SS-13);
C-4 (SS-15);
and D-2 (SS-18).
Photograph # NH 53776, courtesy of the U.S. Naval Historical Center.
SS-19107kPort side view of the D-3 (SS-19) underway, possibly off the New England coast, probably while running builder's trials, circa 1910. US Navy photo from ussubvetsofwwii.org.
Salmon 2.76k SUBMARINE ON LONG TRIP Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from The Washington Herald.(Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, 11 July 1910, Image 3 & The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.] 1902-1939, 03 July 1910, Sunday Evening Edition, Image 7, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
D-3 1.27k Submarine Boat Salmon (SS-19) Making Record on Voyage Condemned as Fatal Folly.Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside.
Photo from Los Angeles Herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, 11 July 1910, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
SS-19977kUncle Sam Has Record-Breaker Submarine.
The new submarine Salmon (SS-19), which will soon be turned over to the government, has broke all records by making, unattended an ocean trip of several hundred miles. She left Provinvetown MA, and arrived in Bermuda, making an average speed of eight an one half miles an hour.
Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA.& Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN.
Photo from The Tacoma Times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, 03 August 1910, Image 6,& PDF from The Appeal. (Saint Paul, Minn.) 1889-19??, 22 October 1910, Image 1, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Salmon 681k UNCLE SAM'S NEWEST SUBMARINE Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from Perrysburg Journal. (Perrysburg, Wood Co., O. [Ohio] 186?-1965, 21 October, 1910, Image 6, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Unknown Photos 375k D-3 (SS-19) circa 1911. Photo courtesy of Ric Hedman.
SS-13-192.76kTender Severn, Snapper (SS-16), Tarpon (SS-14), Bonita (SS-15), Salmon (SS-19), Stingray (SS-13) in Dry Dock # 2, Navy Yard Norfolk VA., February 24, 1911. Time to prepare dock 8 hours: Dock commenced to flood 8:30 AM. Yard workmen taking off manhole plate 12:30 PM.
Between 1 November 1910 and 12 January 1911, South Carolina (BB-26) voyaged to Europe and back with the 2d Battleship Division. This visit took her to Cherbourg, France, and Portland, England. Upon her return to Norfolk, she entered the navy yard for repairs, and then conducted tactics training and maneuvers off the New England coast.
The South Carolina is the battleship in the background.
Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
US National Archives photo from National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
SS-13-192.47kTender Severn, Snapper (SS-16), Tarpon (SS-14), Bonita (SS-15), Salmon (SS-19), & Stingray (SS-13) in Dry Dock # 2, Navy Yard Norfolk VA., February 24, 1911. Time to prepare dock 8 hours: Dock commenced to flood 8:30 AM. Yard workmen taking off manhole plate 12:30 PM. both times.
Note the # 32 on the sail of the Salmon.
US National Archives photo from National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
Who Am I? 528k SUBMARINE THAT TOOK PART IN GREAT RECORD SWIM Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI.
Photo from Evening Bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii) 1895-1912, 22 July 1911, 3:30 EDITION, Image 17, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
E-2 1.25k In Wake of Craft That Cleaves the Depths Lie Many Dead Pioneers
Experiments That Led Up to Wonderful Feat of a Squadron of American Submarines the Other Day Have Cost Hundreds of Lives and Millions of Money.
Embedded text courtesy of U.S. Submarines Through 1945, An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman. Naval Institute Press.
PDF Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.] 1866-1924, 2 July 1911, Image 17, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
SS-14 & friends136kThe Salmon (SS-19),Grayling (SS-18), Tarpon (SS-14), Octopus (SS-09), Bonita (SS-15) with the battleship Nebraska (BB-14) in the background on 28 October 1911. Digital ID # 2162989549_03ac37e6c6_o, LC-B2-2335-13. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection, courtesy of Tom Kermen.
SS-14 & friends136kBow of the tender Severn and her charges: Salmon (SS-19),Grayling (SS-18), Tarpon (SS-14), Octopus (SS-09), Bonita (SS-15) with the battleship Nebraska (BB-14) in the background on 28 October 1911. Digital ID # 2163790702_9293e5e616_o. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection, courtesy of Tom Kermen.
SS-18140kThe internal helm stand of a voice tube on a D-class boat (SS-17/18/19). The watertight door to the torpedo room is seen to the right of the helm wheel. The helm wheel motor is attached via gearing to the transmission shaft, which ran aft to the rudder linkage.
Directly above the helm wheel is a mirror into which the helmsman looked to obtain a view of the magnetic compass repeater above. Normal steering was by an electric switch that operated the motor.
The photo is on page 42 of "United States Submarines" by the Naval Submarine League. Photo submitted by Darryl L. Baker.
SS-19101kCrew posed on deck of the D-3 (SS-19) while cruising out of Newport, Rhode Island, in October 1911. William D. Crowell, an architect from St. Louis, Missouri, was on board at the time. He gave this photograph to Admiral Chester W. Nimitz in 1944, in reminiscence of the "old days". Photograph # NH 58514, courtesy of the U.S. Naval Historical Center. Collection of Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN.
SS-1999kCrew posed on deck of the D-3 (SS-19) while cruising out of Newport, Rhode Island, in October 1911. William D. Crowell, an architect from St. Louis, Missouri, was on board at the time. He gave this photograph to Admiral Chester W. Nimitz in 1944, in reminiscence of the "old days". Photograph # NH 58515, courtesy of the U.S. Naval Historical Center, Collection of Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN.
SS-19108kCrew posed on deck of the D-3 (SS-19) while cruising out of Newport, Rhode Island, in October 1911. William D. Crowell, an architect from St. Louis, Missouri, was on board at the time. He gave this photograph to Admiral Chester W. Nimitz in 1944, in reminiscence of the "old days".Photograph # NH 58516, courtesy of the U.S. Naval Historical Center. Collection of Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN.
SS-19101k William D. Crowell, an architect from St. Louis, Missouri, standing on deck, while D-3 (SS-19) was cruising out of Newport, Rhode Island, in October 1911. Mr. Crowell gave this photograph to Admiral Chester W. Nimitz in 1944, in reminiscence of the "old days". Nimitz, who commanded the submarine's "mother ship" at the time, had invited him on the cruise. Photograph # NH 58517, courtesy of the U.S. Naval Historical Center.Collection of Fleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz, USN.
SS-1958kD-3 (SS-19) underway, starboard side view, at the Naval Review at New York City, 4 October 1912. Kearsarge (BB-5) is in the background. Note the "E" award displayed on D-3's (SS-19) conning tower. Text courtesy of USNHC.
US Navy photo from NARA # 19-N-14523, courtesy of Daniel Dunham.
SS-1924kD-3 (SS-19) underway, starboard side view, possibly at the Naval Review at New York City, 4 October 1912. US Navy photo from ussubvetsofwwii.org.
D-2 & 3 & E-2 62k A number of boats homeported in Key West had squadron numbers in the "2" over some number sequence.
Identifiable boats are: (2nd from the left) D-2 (SS-18), (middle) D-3 (SS-19), (2nd from the right) E-2 (SS-25).
Photo courtesy of The US Navy Submarine Force Museum via Ric Hedman.
SS-1961k D-3 (SS-19) underway submerged, with periscope trained on the camera, prior to World War I. Photographed by N. Moser, New York, and Enrique Muller, Jr. Photograph # NH 102650, courtesy of the U.S. Naval Historical Center. Collection of Christopher H.W. Lloyd.
SS-19328k D-3 (SS-19) "Coming to the Surface", prior to World War I. Note the submarine "fish" flag atop her after periscope. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 102649 photographed by N. Moser, New York, and Enrique Muller, Jr. Collection of Christopher H.W. Lloyd via Robert Hurst.
SS-19101kD-3 (SS-19) underway, prior to World War I. Photograph by Enrique Muller, printed in the book "Our Navy in the War", by Lawrence Perry, 1922. Photograph # NH 82569, courtesy of the U.S. Naval Historical Center.
Smallest 859k SUBMARINE FLOTILLA REACHES NAVY YARD
Five of Uncle Sam's Smallest and Most Menacing Defenders, the Submarines D-1 (SS-17), D-2 (SS-18), D-3 (SS-19), E-1 (SS-24) and E-2 (SS-25), under the lee of the Mother Ship, the Monitor Tonopah (M-8), at the Washington Navy Yard.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.] 1902-1939, 18 July 1914, HOME EDITION, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Orders377k"U.S. Submarines awaiting Orders"
Halftone reproduction, printed on a postal card, of a photograph of five submarines nested together prior to World War I. The three "boats" at right are (from center to right): D-2 (SS-18); D-1 (SS-17); and D-3 (SS-19). The two at left are probably (in no particular order) E-1 (SS-24) and E-2 (SS-25).
Photograph # NH 78926 from the U.S. Naval Historical Center, courtesy of Commander Donald J. Robinson, USN (Medical Service Corps), 1973.
Photo courtesy of ussnewyork.com.
E-2 626k Photograph shows US submarines moored at the 135th street pier on the Upper West Side of New York City as part of the Presidential review of the Atlantic Fleet. The picture shows the Tonopah (M-8) in the center, with the submarines E-1 (SS-24), E-2 (SS-25), D-2 (SS-18), D-1 (SS-17) and D-3 (SS-19) lying from left to right alongside the dock at 135th street. Digital Source: Bain News Service.
LOC photo # LC-B2-3481-14 / 19118v from lcweb2.loc.gov.
E-2 520k VANGUARD OF ATLANTIC FLEET FOR PRESIDNTIAL REVIEW IN NEW YORK
These vessels led the Atlantic fleet which arrived in New York for the big review by President Wilson. The picture shows the Tonopah (M-8) in the background, with the submarines E-1 (SS-24), E-2 (SS-25), D-2 (SS-18), D-1 (SS-17) and D-3 (SS-19) lying from left to right alongside the dock at 135th street. On recount of the activities of the submarines in the European War, these little under-the-water craft of the United States navy are coming in for a great deal of interest by the public.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.] 1914-1942, 08 May 1915, Night Extra, Image 18, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
E-2 804k Four American Submarines Ready for Naval Exhibition
From left to right:E-2 (SS-25), D-2 (SS-18), D-1 (SS-17) and D-3 (SS-19).
Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC.
Photo from The Intelligencer. (Anderson, S.C.) 1915-1917, 14 May 1915, Image 8, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
D-3 166k Crew of the D-3 (SS-19) recovering a torpedo.Photo by Enrique Muller, # HD-SN-99-02141 from the WAR & CONFLICT CD series from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection, courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil. Photo i.d. courtesy of David Johnston.
D-3 379k OUR OWN SUBMARINES SHOW EFFICIENCY IN TRYING TIMES Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo & text by The Sun. (New York [N.Y.] 1833-1916, 26 September 1915, FOURTH SECTION PICTORIAL MAGAZINE, Image 35, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
SS-1952k Halftone reproduction of a photograph by N. Moser and Enrique Muller, Jr., showing the D-3 (SS-19) underway submerged, circa 1916, with her periscope trained on the camera. It is printed on an advertising blotter. Note the submarine "fish" flag.Photograph # NH 77469, courtesy of the U.S. Naval Historical Center donated by Commander Donald J. Robinson, USN(MSC), 1973.
D-3 967k Replacing the torpedo in the tube.
The torpedo has a propeller and operates somewhat like a little submarine. The Germans used it with deadly accuracy on unprotected merchant vessels.
Photo by Enrique Muller from the “Harper’s Pictorial Library of the World War Vol. XI”, Children’s Book of War, courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
D-3 640k Port broadside view of the D-3 (SS-19).Photo from the files of the Vallejo Naval and Historical Museum courtesy of Darryl L. Baker, possibly by Enrique Muller from the “Harper’s Pictorial Library of the World War Vol. XI”, Children’s Book of War.
Photo added 04/18/14.
D-3 685k ONE OF OUR FLEET OF SUBMARINES
Near view of the D-3 (SS-19), which it equipped with four torpedo tubes.
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Sun. (New York, [N.Y.]) 1916-1920, 18 February 1917, Section 4 Pictorial Magazine, Image 46, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
D-3 838k LOADING A U.S. SUBMARINE WITH GIANT TORPEDOES
One of Uncle Sam's submarines is here seen taking on a cargo of mammoth torpedoes. Great care must be taken in the handling of these sensitive pieces of destruction.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo & text by Evening Public Ledger. (Tacoma, Wash.) (Philadelphia [Pa.] 1914-1942, 02 July 1918, Sports Extra, Image 9, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
SS-19380k D-3 (SS-19) alongside a dock with other submarines on an icy day, circa 1918. Location is probably the Submarine Base at Groton, Connecticut. D-3 appears to be wearing pattern camouflage. Other submarines present are (moving outward from D-3: D-1 (SS-17); G-4 (SS-26); and G-3 (SS-31).Photograph # NH 99157 via Robert Hurst.
SS-1977k The eyepiece of D-3's (SS-19) hull periscope is shown. The nearby handwheel was geared to turn the barrel of the periscope against the strong resisting forces of the sea and of the packing that kept the barrel's penetration through the hull watertight. Above the handwheel the ring gear attached to the periscope barrel is clearly visible.
Note also the plane wheel visible at lower right is connected by belt to the rod in the overhead that actually control the plane, as in earlier E.B. submarines.
Photo courtesy of Submarine Force Museum & Library. Text courtesy of U.S. Submarines Through 1945, An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman. Naval Institute Press.
SS-18, 19, 40, 43 & 5091k D-3 (SS-19), at left, and D-2 (SS-18) center, at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania, 5 March 1919, with shipyard workmen on board. Note the ventilating fans on D-3's deck. A derrick barge is alongside D-2. Among the four submarines visible in the background are L-1 (SS-40), L-4 (SS-43) and L-10 (SS-50). A motorcycle is parked at the far left. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph, # NH 51157.
Low 74k Admiral Francis Stuart Low was born in Albany, New York, on 15 August 1894, son of the late Commander William Franklin Low, USN, and Mrs. Anna (Stuart) Low. He attended High School in Newton, Massachusetts and US Naval Academy, graduating from the later with the Class of 1915. In 1926 he completed the junior course at the Naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island. His first assignments after graduation were in the battleship Connecticut (BB-18) and cruiser Montana (ACR-13). In the early part of his illustrious career, he was designated a submariner, and commanded the submarines D-3 (SS-19), O-9 (SS-70), L-1 (SS-40), L-2 (SS-41), S-12 (SS-117), and served on the staffs of Commander Submarine Division FIVE and Commander Control Force during and subsequent to World War One. This continuous sea duty from 1915 to 1925 was briefly interrupted for a six months assignment with the Tactical Group Submarine Chasers, New London, Connecticut. Text & US Navy photo courtesy of Bill Gonyo.

View the Salmon / D-3 (SS-19)
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