Please report any broken links or trouble you might come across to the Webmaster.
Please take a moment to let us know so that we can correct any problems and make your visit as enjoyable and as informative as possible.


NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive

Skipjack / E-1 (SS-24)


E Class Submarine: Laid down, as Skipjack, 22 December 1909, at Fore River Shipbuilding Co., Quincy, MA.; Launched, 27 May 1911; Renamed E-1, 17 November 1911; Commissioned USS E-1, 14 February 1912; Placed in commission in reserve, 20 March 1920; Redesignated SS-24, 17 July 1920; Put in ordinary 18 July 1921; Decommissioned, and struck from the Naval Register, 20 October 1921, at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Philadelphia, PA.; Final Disposition, ordered sold 22 October 1921; sold for scrapping, 19 April 1922.
Partial data submitted by Yves Hubert.

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced 287 t., Submerged 342 t.; Length 135' 3"; Beam 14' 7"; Draft 11' 8"; Speed, Surfaced 13.5 kts, Submerged 11.5 kts; Depth Limit 200'; Complement 1 Officer 19 Enlisted; Armament, four 18" torpedo tubes, four torpedoes; Propulsion, diesel electric, New London Ship & Engine Co., diesel engines, 700 hp, Fuel Capacity 8,486 gals., Electro Dynamic Co. electric motors, 600 hp, Battery Cells 120, twin propellers.
Click On Image
For Full Size Image
SizeImage DescriptionContributed
By
Submarine History Profiles:105kSubmarine History Profiles:
First true submarine: Holland (SS-01) in 1900.
First U.S. Diesel submarine: E-1 (SS-24) in 1911.
First Fleet boat: V-1 (SS-163) in 1922.
First GUPPY: Odax (SS-484) in 1947.
First nuclear powered submarine: Nautilus (SSN-571) in 1954.
First submarine to completely circumnavigate the earth submerged: Triton (SSRN-586) in 1959.
Latest generation of U.S. ballistic submarines: Ohio (SSBN-726), in 1980.
USN photo courtesy of Robert Hall. Photo i.d. courtesy of Dave Johnston (USNR)
E-1 & 2 1.06k TWO OF UNCLE SAM'S LATEST SUBMARINES
THE E-1 (SS-24) & E-2 (SS-25), NOW AT THE NAVY YARD, WILL START FOR A TEST RUN TO NORFOLK TODAY.
THE SUBMARINE MASCOTS
Master, the pet of the E-1, and Lady, the favorite of the E-2.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 05 March 1912, Image 5, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Crude Oil 627k E-1 (SS-24) and E-2 (SS-25), Navy's Newest Submarines, Burn Crude Oil. Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH.
Photo from The Democratic Banner. (Mt. Vernon, Ohio) 1898-192?, 19 March 1912, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
NEVADA 699k Tonopah (M-8) with 2 submarines alongside in Galveston, Texas, August 1912.
The submarine on the left is an E-boat (SS-24 /25), boat to the right is D-1 (SS-17). There are two unknown boats behind them.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Ric Hedmen.
Photographer: Paul Verkin.
National Archives Identifier: 45513822
Local Identifier: 165-WW-338B-64.
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
SS-24649kE-1 (SS-24) underway, starboard side view, at the Naval Review at New York City, 4 October 1912.
The E-2 (SS-25) is underway to the stern of the E-1.
National Archives Identifier: 45513729
Local Identifier: 165-WW-338B-019
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
Photo added 08/01/17.
SS-2493kE-1 (SS-24) underway, starboard side view, probably at the Naval Review at New York City, 4 October 1912. Note the sailor on top of the canvas covering of the bridge.Photo fix courtesy of Jim Kelling.
USN photo courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org.
SS-2455kE-1 (SS-24) underway, starboard side view, probably at the Naval Review at New York City, 4 October 1912. Photo by H. Reuterdahl, Esq. from "Jane's Fighting Ships, 1919, courtesy of Robert Hurst.
SS-24130kThe E-1 (SS-24) sails along the Hudson River on 4 October 1912 Naval Review. Digital ID # ggbain 24399v, LC-B2-4211-13. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection, courtesy of Tom Kermen.
SS-24101kMoored to a pier at Naval Station, Key West (Florida) on 23 January 1914, submarine tender Tonopah (BM-8) provides services and accommodations for the crew of the developmental submarine, E-1 (SS-24). Note laundry drying on Tonopah's starboard side.
E-1 can be identified by the unique protrusions on either side of her bow, unlike Sturgeon's (E-2) plain bow. Both of these diesel powered boats were equipped with "wireless"(radio) equipment which accounts for a higher foremast than the other submarines of the "C" or "D" classes of the flotilla under the charge of Tonopah.
The "navigation bridges" and canvas on early submarines would be cleared and stowed within five minutes for submerged operations.
Photo # RC06933 courtesy of State Archives of Florida, Records Collection via Don Wagner.
Orders377k"U.S. Submarines awaiting Orders"
Halftone reproduction, printed on a postal card, of a photograph of five submarines nested together prior to World War I. The three "boats" at right are (from center to right): D-2 (SS-18); D-1 (SS-17); and D-3 (SS-19). The two at left are probably (in no particular order) E-1 (SS-24) and E-2 (SS-25).
Photograph # NH 78926 from the U.S. Naval Historical Center, courtesy of Commander Donald J. Robinson, USN (Medical Service Corps), 1973.
Photo courtesy of ussnewyork.com.
E-2 626k Photograph shows US submarines moored at the 135th street pier on the Upper West Side of New York City as part of the Presidential review of the Atlantic Fleet. The picture shows the Tonopah (M-8) in the center, with the submarines E-1 (SS-24), E-2 (SS-25), D-2 (SS-18), D-1 (SS-17) and D-3 (SS-19) lying from left to right alongside the dock at 135th street. Digital Source: Bain News Service.
LOC photo # LC-B2-3481-14 / 19118v from lcweb2.loc.gov.
E-2 520k VANGUARD OF ATLANTIC FLEET FOR PRESIDENTIAL REVIEW IN NEW YORK
These vessels led the Atlantic fleet which arrived in New York for the big review by President Wilson. The picture shows the Tonopah (M-8) in the background, with the submarines E-1 (SS-24), E-2 (SS-25), D-2 (SS-18), D-1 (SS-17) and D-3 (SS-19) lying from left to right alongside the dock at 135th street. On recount of the activities of the submarines in the European War, these little under-the-water craft of the United States navy are coming in for a great deal of interest by the public.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 08 May 1915, Night Extra, Image 18, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
E-1 520k COMMANDER & RECORD BREAKING CREW OF THE E-1 (SS-24)
Submarine sailed 1,230 miles from Key West, Florida to New York under her own power without a single stop. No other submarine has ever made such a record.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 08 May 1915, Night Extra, Image 18, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Smallest 617k Can Sail in Two Hours," Says Admiral Fletcher of U. S. Fleet
E-1 (SS-24) is pictured.
Image and text provided by University of Oregon Libraries; Eugene, OR.
Photo from The Evening Herald. (Klamath Falls, Or.) 1906-1942, 20 May 1915, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Crude Oil 622k Torpedo of E-1 (SS-24) Could Sink Any Battleship Now Afloat.Image and text provided by University of Oregon, Knight Library; Eugene,OR.
Photo from The Evening Herald. (Klamath Falls, Or.) 1906-1942, 21 May 1915, Image 3, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
SS-2497kLoading torpedoes aboard the E-1 (SS-24).This USN photo appeared in the Spring 2003 edition of the magazine "UNDERSEAWARFARE", submitted by Darryl L. Baker.
SS-2425kLine drawing of the E-1 (SS-24). Drawing by Jim Christley. Photo & text courtesy of U.S. Submarines Through 1945, An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman. Naval Institute Press.
SS-24 646k U.S.Submarine E-1 (SS-24) and Her OfficersImage and text provided by University of Oregon, Knight Library; Eugene,OR.
Photo from The Evening Herald. (Klamath Falls, Or.) 1906-1942, 07 February 1917, Image 3, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Who Am I 630k Should Germany Defeat Allies, U. S. Safety Would Depend On Submarines
American Submarine under full headway
Should Germany succeed in starving England and France into submission by means of her U-boats, the submarine as a defensive weapon would immediately become a thing of tremendous importance to the United States. With many submarines Uncle Sam could prevent Germany from landing troops and supplies on his coasts. The photograph gives a clear conception of the power of this American undersea craft and shows clearly its construction above the waterline.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Ric Hedman.
Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo & text by The Ogden Standard.(Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, 07 May 1917, 4 P.M. CITY EDITION, Image 8, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
SS-24 & 4359kE-1 (SS-24) inboard & L-4 (SS-43), probably taken between 4 December 1917 & 12 January 1918, when both boats left Newport R.I. for the Ponta Delgada in the Azores, protecting the islands from German attack and use as a haven by U-boats. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
E-boats 883k Submarines of the E-class. From left to right: E-2 (SS-25), E-1 (SS-24) and unknown, circa 1918,Photographer: Central News Photo Service
National Archives Identifier: 45513751
Local Identifier: 165-WW-338B-29.
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
SS-24125kRear Admiral Thomas Withers commanded the submarine E-1 (SS-24) from April 1914 to July 1916. During this time, E-1 made a 10-day voyage, the longest by a U.S. submarine to that time. The voyage tested crew and submarine endurance and proved that the smaller submarines then being proposed would not meet U.S. Navy requirements for trans-oceanic operations.
Withers commanded Submarine Division 95 from July 1922 to March 1923. He was also Commander Submarines, Scouting Force from January 1941 to May 1942. This command became Submarine Force, Pacific Fleet, at the outbreak of World War II.
USN photo courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
SS-24303kThe date is between 17 July 1920 when she was designated (SS-24), she was placed in commission, in ordinary (reserve), 18 July 1921, and on 17 September sailed for Philadelphia, where she was decommissioned 20 October 1921 and sold 19 April 1922. So dating is between 1920 and 1922. These are probably some of the last images taken of E-1.Photo from the private collection of Ric Hedman.
SS-24392kThe date is between 17 July 1920 when she was designated (SS-24), she was placed in commission, in ordinary (reserve), 18 July 1921, and on 17 September sailed for Philadelphia, where she was decommissioned 20 October 1921 and sold 19 April 1922. So dating is between 1920 and 1922. These are probably some of the last images taken of E-1.Photo from the private collection of Ric Hedman & fixed by Jim Kelling.

View the Skipjack / E-1 (SS-24)
DANFS history entry located on the Haze Gray & Underway Web Site.
Crew Contact And Reunion Information
Not Applicable to this Vessel
Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
PigBoats.COM TM, a Historic Look at Submarines

Back To The Main Photo IndexBack To the Submarine Index
Problems and site related matters, E-mail Webmaster
This page is created by Gary Priolo and maintained by Michael Mohl
1996 - 2017, NavSource History All rights reserved.