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NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Contributed by Don McGrogan, BMCS, USN (ret.)

K-5 (SS-36)

Radio Call Sign: November - Yankee - Juliet

K Class Submarine: Laid down, 10 June 1912, at Fore River Shipbuilding Co., Quincy, MA.; Launched, 17 March 1914; Commissioned, USS K-5, 22 August 1914; Designated (SS-36), 17 July 1920; Decommissioned, 20 February 1923, at Hampton Roads (Submarine Base); Struck from the Naval Register, 18 December 1930; Final Disposition, sold for scrapping, 3 June 1931.

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 392 t., Submerged: 521 t.; Length 153' 7"; Beam 16' 8"; Draft 13' 1"; Speed, Surfaced 14 kts, Submerged 10.5 kts; Operating Depth, 200'; Complement, 2 Officers, 26 Enlisted; Armament, four 18" torpedo tubes, eight torpedoes, one 3"/23 deck gun; Propulsion, diesel-electric, New London Ship & Engine Co., diesel engines, HP 960, Fuel Capacity, 18,126, Electro Dynamic Co., electric motors, HP 960, Battery Cells, 120, single propeller.
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K-5
0803626
NR Loading a torpedo into the K-5 (SS-36). Each one of these projectiles costs the government $7,500. One of them is capable of sending the most powerful vessel afloat to the bottom. Image and text provided by Indiana State Library.
Photo & text by The Richmond Palladium and Sun-Telegram. [volume] (Richmond, Ind.) 1907-1939, 28 November 1914, Image 1 courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
K-6 774k OLD AND NEW
America's first battleship, the Constitution, and the navy's latest acquisitions, the submarines K-5 (SS-36) and K-6 (SS-37), lying side by side in the Charlestown navy yard.
Photo by International News Service.
Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO.
Photo from The Hayti Herald. (Hayti, Mo.) 1908-1922, 03 December 1914, Image 9, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
K-6 475k Boston Merchant Marine, East Boston and Charlestown Navy Yard.
America's first battleship, the Constitution, and the navy's latest acquisitions, the submarines K-5 (SS-36) and K-6 (SS-37), lying side by side in the Charlestown navy yard.
Photo # 08_06_032616 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via flickr.com.
K-5719k(Original Caption) K-5 (SS-36) showing her on speed trial, off Massachusetts coast...K-5 tearing through the water with part of the deck and observation turret showing above the surface.
The K-5 at full speed in a heavy sea. When running on the surface, the vessel has the seaworthiness of a destroyer.
Insert photo taken from "Popular Mechanics" Magazine, March 1915, courtesy of Robert Hurst.
Photo Bettmann Collection/Getty Images, courtesy of gettyimages.com.
K 1.0k Submarines K-1 (SS-32), K-2 (SS-33), K-5 (SS-36) & K-6 (SS-37) at 135th street and the North River.
K-5 getting into place is shown in the lower picture.
Photoi.d. courtesy of Ric Hedman.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from the New-York Tribune. New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 07 May 1915, Image 6, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
K 835k LAST BUT NOT LEAST IN NAVAL PAGEANT.
On her recent trip from Pensacola to New York, the K-5 (SS-36) and three other submarines in the same class made one of the longest continuous voyages ever attempted by vessels of this submersible type. When Lt. R.C. Grady, her commander, steered alongside the landing at 135 St. on 6 May, a statement from the Navy Dept. referred to the voyage from Key West "an uninterrupted run of about 1,200 miles, one of the longest steady runs ever accompanied by American submarines."
....Ensign H.C. Fraser and members of the crew were completely exhausted after the nerve racking voyage.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from the New-York Tribune. New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 19 May 1915, Image 1, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
K-51.60kUS Navy Leads in Development of the Submarine
K-5 (SS-36) and K-6 (SS-37) AT DOCK IN BOSTON NAVY YARD.
Fine-screen halftone reproduction, published in "Sea Power" magazine, May 1917. USNHC photograph # NH 76058.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Aryeh Wetherhorn.
Insert PDF Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from the Evening Star. (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 27 June 1915, Image 52, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Henry Ford 1.40k Ford Explores Submarine;16 Times Too Big He Says
Henry Ford going aboard E-2 (SS-25) on inspection tour of United State undersea craft.
Inventor Sees Undersea Craft for First time, Shakes Head Over Cost After Inspecting K-5 (SS-36) and E-2 at Navy Yard Docks.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 September 1915, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
K NR BOTTOM OF THE "STAIRS" THE LIMIT OF HENRY FORD'S FIRST SUBMARINE TRIP
Henry Ford on the deck of submarine K-5 (SS-36), at the New York Navy yesterday.
Left to right: Lieut. R. P. Craft. Naval Constructor G. H. Rock. Capt. G. E. Burd, Mr. Ford and his son Edsel Ford; Lieut. C. W. Nimitz. Lieutenant-Commander E. P. Jessup.
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, 24 September 1915, Image 3, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Tonopah 701k New York Navy Yard on 4 November 1915. Waterfront, Looking Southeast from South Side of Pier F:
Two former monitors, converted to submarine tenders appear one behind the other. The Tonopah (M-8) is most likely the 1st ship & the Ozark (M-7) the other. Their charges are 4 K class submarines in camouflage; (in no particular order that can be determined here) K-1 (SS-32), K-2 (SS-33), K-5 (SS-36) & K-6 (SS-37). What appear to be 3 submarines are moored port side of the Ozark in the photo here.
National Archives Identifier: 6880309
Agency-Assigned Identifier: F644 N266
Photo i.d. courtesy of Aryeh Wetherhorn & Ric Hedman.
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
K boats & BB-30 Florida1.20kOctober 1915. USN subs K-1 (SS-32), K-2 (SS-33), K-6 (SS-37) & K-5 (SS-36) prior to going to Europe after the US entered WW I. The Florida (BB-30) is seen at rear.
Notice that the K-5 is being repainted OUT of dazzle before deployment.
Photo by Enrique Muller Jr.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Aryeh Wetherhorn & Ric Hedman.
National Archives Identifier: 45510310
Local Identifier: 165-WW-322D-25.
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
68810981.16kNew York Navy Yard on 24 January 1916, 6 submarines in drydock.
G-4 (SS-26) is in the center. Stern planes configuration makes this definitely her. Cool thing - notice the two part hatch on the aft deck. It is a hatch/scuttle combination normally found on surface ships, but EXTREMELY rare on submarines. In fact I would say this is the first time that I have ever seen this on a USN boat. It is probably a feature of her original Italian Laurenti design.
The boat on the right is definitely the G-2 (SS-27). G-3 (SS-31) had a similar after superstructure, but by the date of the photo she had already received prominent blister saddle tanks on the side of the hull, and those are missing on this photo. Both boats were known to be in New York during the time of the photo.
I'd like to say that the left hand boat is a "K" boat just due to the fact there is some painted Camo in the top of the periscope shears. K-5 (SS-36) or K-6 (SS-37) maybe. The rest of the boats are the other K boats, K-1 (SS-32) & K-2 (SS-33).
Photo & text i.d. courtesy of Ric Hedman & Dave Johnston (USNR).
National Archives Identifier: 6881098
Agency-Assigned Identifier: F542N150
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
K-5 653k SUBMARINE K-5 (SS-36) Undersea Craft Lost In Fog Reaches Key West, Florida.Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH
Photo from The Democratic Banner. (Mt. Vernon, Ohio) 1898-192?, 04 February 1916, Image 4, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
K-5 615k SUBMARINE K-5 (SS-36) REPORTED MISSING ON WAY FROM NEW YORK TO PENSACOLA.Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo from The Logan Republican. (Logan, Utah) 1902-1924, 15 February 1916, Image 6, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
K-5134kPortside view of the K-5 (SS-36) off Pensacola, Florida on 12 April, 1916, underway with "zebra" camouflage. US National Archive photo # 80-G-451709, courtesy of Daniel Dunham.
K-5, K-61.01kK-5 (SS-36) and K-6 (SS-37) alongside the monitor Tallahassee Hampton Roads, 10 December 1916. National Archives Identifier: 55167370
Local Identifier: 111-SC-002989.
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
K-51.03k K-6 (SS-37) underway in Hampton Roads, Virginia, 13 December 1916. Note that the # 42 is on her periscope shears.
The K-5 (SS-36) is in the distance.
National Archives Identifier: 45513773
Local Identifier: 165-WW-338B-40
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
K-55660kK-5 (SS-36) in Hampton Roads, Virginia, 13 December 1916. National Archives Identifier: 45513705
Local Identifier: 165-WW-338B-007.
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
K-51.13kPort side view of the K-5 (SS-36) in Hampton Roads, Virginia, 13 December 1916. National Archives Identifier: 45513775
Local Identifier: 165-WW-338B-41
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
K 472k Submarines K-1 (SS-32), K-4 (SS-35), K-5 (SS-36) at Tampa, Florida. The boats still have their pre-WW I canvas bridge covers. All three went to the Azores in October 1917 so would have had the chariot bridge conversion there. This is a pre-WW I photo circa 1915/16. Photo courtesy of John Hayward.
Text i.d. courtesy of Dave Johnston (USNR) & Ric Hedman.
K-1, K-2, K-5, K-6 NR Preparation by the Navy to Take Its Part in the War
"American submarines of the K-class fitted out with machinery & equipment of the latest type to be used in case of hostile descent on our coast".
Pictured in no particular order are probably the K-1 (SS-32), K-2 (SS-33), K-5 (SS-36), and K-6 (SS-37) alongside the tender Bushnell (AS-2), Ponta Delgada, Azores, circa 1918.
Photo dates from at least 26 April 1917 as is evidenced from this PDF.
Photo by Central News, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Partial text from "The War of the Nations" (New York), pg 362, 31 December 1919.
Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS.
Photo from the The Topeka State Journal. [volume] (Topeka, Kan.) 1892-1980, 26 April 1917, POSTSCRIPT, Image 6, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
K-5
0803627
944k Two submarines in port, (one of which may be a K-boat) by the artist Joseph Pennell, circa 1917. Photo courtesy of loc.gov.
Reproduction Number LC-USZ62-49505.
U-boats 605k Uncle Sam Gets Points For Improvement of Navy From Captured Submarine
U-BOAT TAKEN BY BRITISH GIVES "TIPS" TO U.S. NAVY
The latest type of United States submarine, the K-class, in which Uncle Sam is making improvements, learned by studying captured German vessels. This is the K-5 (SS-36).
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Newspaper text courtesy of The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 30 December 1917, FINAL EDITION, Image 3, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
SS-34622kJust back from the war, K-1 (SS-32), K-2 (SS-33), K-5 (SS-36) & K-6 (SS-37) attract a crowd in the North River, NYC, November 1918. (The info on the photo says Nov. 1917, but DANFS says all of them were in the Azores from 12 October 1917 till November 1918.National Archives Identifier: 45513781
Local Identifier: 165-WW-338B-044
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
K-596k K-5 (SS-36) underway, during her 1919 Mississippi River cruise.Official USN photo now in the collections of the National Archives. USNHC photo # 80-G-1025096.
PDF Image and text provided by Connecticut State Library, Hartford, CT.
Photo & text by New Britain Herald. [volume] (New Britain, Conn.) 1890-1976, 24 July 1919, Image 10, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
K-5
0803688
NR Memphian Member of Crew Of Sub Coming Up River
The United States submarine K-5 (SS-36) and the German submarine UB-88, have left the submarine base at Key West, Fla., and are reported to have started up the Mississippi.
Image and text provided by University of Tennessee.
Photo & text by The News Scimitar.(Memphis, Tenn.) 1907-1926, 06 May 1919, 4th Edition, Image 11 courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
K-5102k K-5 (SS-36) underway on the Mississippi River, 1919. Photographed from the mast of an escorting Navy ship. USNHC photograph # NH 52384.
K-598k K-5 (SS-36) underway on the Mississippi River, 1919. Photographed from the mast of an escorting Navy ship. USNHC photograph # NH 52385.
K-5123kK-5 (SS-36), the first submarine to navigate the Mississippi River, arriving at St Louis, 14 June 1919. USN photo # NR&L (Mod) 4733 from DANFS, submitted by Joe Radigan, MACM USN, Ret.
K-570k K-5 (SS-36) underway on the Mississippi River, 1919. Photographed from on board an escorting Navy ship. USNHC photograph # NH 52381.
K-564k K-5 (SS-36) underway on the Mississippi River, 1919, with crewmen relaxing on deck. Photographed from on board an escorting Navy ship. USNHC photograph # NH 52386.
K-579k K-5 (SS-36) preparing to dock, during her 1919 Mississippi River cruise.
She displays some standard WW I modifications: passive sound gear forward (the three "rats" of a Y-tube forward of the outward planes & an SC tube forward of the forward hatch); a permanent chariot bridge; and housing periscopes.
A submarine chaser (SC) is astern of the K-5.
Partial text courtesy of U.S. Submarines Through 1945, An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.Naval Institute Press.
K-571k K-5 (SS-36) taking a party of St. Louis businessmen down for a dive in the Mississippi River, 1919. USNHC photograph # NH 52378.
K-5296k K-5 (SS-36) during her 1919 Mississippi River cruise. PDF courtesy of Ron Reeves (of blessed memory).
K-565k "Y-Tube" hydrophone mounted on the K-5's (SS-36) bow, 1919. USNHC photograph # NH 52379.
K-572kE.B.'s K-5 (SS-36) is shown as built, with faired periscope shears. The shaded circle under her fore planes is a Fressenden oscillator, the replacement for the earlier signal bell.Drawing by Jim Christley. Photo & text courtesy of U.S. Submarines Through 1945, An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman. Naval Institute Press.
K 378k Unidentified K-boat in New York City Harbor; K-1 (SS-32), K-2 (SS-33), K-5 (SS-36), or K-6 (SS-37) sails along in this undated postcard photo. Photo by Underwood & Underwood courtesy of Arnold A. Putnam via Gary Priolo.
K 117k K-boats in harbor with a four funnel destroyer in the background;
K-1 (SS-32), K-2 (SS-33), K-6 (SS-37), K-4 (SS-35), K-7 (SS-38), K-3 (SS-34), K-5 (SS-36) & K-8 (SS-39) appear in this undated photo. K-5 is being repainted.
Text i.d. courtesy of Ric Hedman.
Photo courtesy of Rick Larson (of blessed memory) via the unique hand of Ric Hedman.
K boats 748k UNITED STATES submarines in drydock at the Navy Yard. The wonders of League Island will be open to the public today for the navy relief-day celebration. Visitors will have an opportunity to see the great changes that have taken place in the Navy Yard.
K-5 (SS-36), K-7 (SS-38), K-8 underwent overhaul here during this period.
K-5 departed Key West for Philadelphia 12 June 1920, arriving the 17th for overhaul.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA & DANFS.
Photo from the Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 28 June 1919, Sports Extra, Image 24, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Ric Hedman.
K 843k One of the mother ships of Uncle Sam's navy the Camden (AS-6), and her nine undersea kittens, a formidable flotilla of Yankee submarines that have been a source of great interest the last two weeks to visitors to the Atlantic Fleet at anchor in the Hudson. The Camden and her family have been at anchor off the Seventies. Above. How the K-5 (SS-36) looks when traveling at full speed on the surface. Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from the New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 16 May 1920, Image 59, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
K 696k There are fewer busier places in Philadelphia than the large drydock at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, where repairs are being made on eleven of Uncle Sam's submarine craft.
Among the boats visible is the K-1 (SS-32), which appears in the front left corner, and K-5 (SS-36), behind her.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from the Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 14 October 1920, NIGHT EXTRA, Image 26, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
K-5134kK-5 (SS-36) underway, starboard side view, date and location unknown. USN photo from NARA # 19-N-13877, courtesy of Daniel Dunham.
K-5672kK-5 (SS-36) sports cold weather uniforms while sailing with N.Y.? in the background. USN photo from National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
Unknown Photos 412k Submarine being overhauled, Philadelphia Navy Yard drydock, 19 March 1929.
The boats might be K-boats, with one Lake design N-class.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Dave Johnston (USNR) & Ric Hedman.
Photo 08_06_006682 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.

View the K-5 (SS 36)
DANFS history entry located on the Haze Gray & Underway Web Site.
Crew Contact And Reunion Information
Not Applicable to this Vessel
Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
PigBoats.COM TM, a Historic Look at Submarines

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