Please report any broken links or trouble you might come across to the Webmaster.
Please take a moment to let us know so that we can correct any problems and make your visit as enjoyable and as informative as possible.


NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive

L-4 (SS-43)

Radio Call Sign: November - Yankee - Quebec

L-1 Class Submarine: Laid down, 23 March 1914, at Fore River Shipbuilding Co., Quincy, MA.; Launched, 3 April 1915; Commissioned, USS L-4, 4 May 1916; Designated (SS-43), 17 July 1920; Decommissioned and simultaneously struck from the Naval Register, date unknown, at Philadelphia, PA; Final Disposition, sold for scrapping, 31 July 1922, to Pottstown Steel Co., Douglasville, PA.
Partial data submitted by Yves Hubert.

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 450 t., Submerged: 548 t.; Length 167' 5"; Beam 17' 5"; Draft 13' 7"; Speed, Surfaced 14 kts, Submerged 10.5 kts; Depth Limit 200'; Complement 2 Officers, 26 Enlisted; Armament, four 18", torpedo tubes, 8 torpedoes, one 3"/23 deck gun; Propulsion, diesel-electric, New London Ship and Engine Co. diesel engine, HP 900, Fuel Capacity, 18,977 gal., Electro Dynamic Co. electric motor, HP 680, Battery Cells 120, single propeller.
Click On Image
For Full Size Image
Size Image Description Contributed
By
L-4 440k L-4 (SS-43), running trials, 1915. National Archives Identifier: 45513755
Local Identifier: 165-WW-338B-31.
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
Photo added 06/16/17.
L-4 365k L-4 (SS-43) is seen in Dry Dock 1 of the Boston Navy Yard ca. 1916-17. The Constitution can be seen in the background. USN photo from the National Park Service, Boston National Historical Park, cat. no.BOSTS-11689, courtesy of Stephen P. Carlson, Preservation Specialist, Boston NHP, Charlestown Navy Yard.
M-1 743k All the news that's fit to misprint, #1.
UNITED STATES TESTS FIRST OF BIG NEW SEA-GOING SUBMARINES
The M-1 (SS-47) is shown on her trial trip off Provincetown, Mass., on 6 July. She is 230 1/2 feet long, with 21 1/2-foot beam. Her radius of action is 2,000 miles.
She is not as large as the German submarine Deutschland, now at Baltimore, whoso length is 315 feet, with a 30 foot beam.
It is actually an EB design L-class boat. The paper that originally published the photo misidentified it. The caption is wrong.
Photo & text i.d. courtesy of Dave Johnston.
Image provided by: Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 11 July 1916, Night Extra, Image 2, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
M-1 531k All the news that's fit to misprint, # 2.
LARGEST SUBMARINE STANDS STIFF TEST
Above is a picture of the U.S. submarine M-1 (SS-47) the largest submarine of our navy. She was photographed while being put through an exciting trip at Provincetown. Mass. She can travel 5000 miles without a stop, 1000 more than was covered by the Deutschland.".
It is actually an EB design L-class boat. The paper that originally published the photo misidentified it. The caption is wrong.
Photo & text i.d. courtesy of Dave Johnston.
Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX.
Photo from El Paso Herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, 21 July 1916, HOME EDITION, Image 6, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Pennell 127k What looks to be L-class (SS-40/51) submarines in dry dock, by the artist Joseph Pennell, 1917. Photo # 3c19552v, LC-USZ62-119552. Photograph courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Tonopah 496k A MOTHER SEADOG GUARDING HER PUPPIES
This interesting photograph was taken within the Charlestown Navy Yard, where the United States submarine tender Tonopah (M-8) lies at anchor with her undersea charges, comprising submarine fleet No.3, of the North Atlantic fleet.
Probable submarines are the E.B. designed L-boats (SS-40 / 43 & 49 / 51), [L-1 thru 4 & 9 thru 11.]
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from Evening Public Ledger.(Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 02 June 1917, Postscript Edition, Pictorial Section, Image 19, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
SS-24 & 4359kE-1 (SS-24) inboard & L-4 (SS-43), probably taken between 4 December 1917 & 12 January 1918, when both boats left Newport R.I. for the Ponta Delgada in the Azores, protecting the islands from German attack and use as a haven by U-boats.USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
L-2 & 4366kLoading a MK7 Bliss-Leavitt torpedo aboard the drydocked submarines L-2 (SS-41) & L-4 (SS-43) when they were based at Bantry Bay, Ireland, between January 1918 & 1919.
The MK7 was 17.7 inches diameter and 17 feet long & weighed 1628 pounds.
Photo & text i.d. courtesy of Ric Hedman.
National Archives Identifier: 45514059
Local Identifier: 165-WW-339C-40
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
L- boats 753k Sack Time. Typical of the subject submarines, here men are stacked four high on canvas fold away bunks aboard an American L-boat in the European theater. Photo from Illustrated London News, 28 September, 1918, courtesy of Beneath the Surface: World War I Submarines Built in Seattle and Vancouver by Bill Lightfoot.
L-boats 600k "L" class submarines probably alongside Bushnell (AS-2) at Bantry Bay, Ireland, in 1918. L-3 (SS-42), L-1 (SS-40), L-10 (SS-50), L-4 (SS-43), L-9 (SS-49). USN photo # Lot-5410-23, Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels Collection. Photographed through Mylar sleeve. Courtesy of the Library of Congress via National Museum of the U.S. Navy via flickr.com.
L-4 71k L-4 (SS-43) underway in 1918, probably in Bantry Bay, Ireland. USN photo # NH 51137, from the collections of the US Naval Historical Center.
L-4 57k L-4 (SS-43) off Berehaven, Ireland, in 1918. USN photo # NH 51138, from the collections of the US Naval Historical Center.
L-4 71k L-4 (SS-43) underway off Bantry Bay, Ireland, in 1918. USN photo # NH 51139, from the collections of the US Naval Historical Center.
L-4 104k L-4 (SS-43) in right center background, exercising with another submarine off Ireland, in 1918. USN photo # NH 51140, from the collections of the US Naval Historical Center.
L-4 73k L-4 (SS-43) making a crash dive off the Irish coast, 1918. USN photo # NH 51141, from the collections of the US Naval Historical Center.
L-Boats221k Bushnell (AS-2) lifting L-2 (SS-41) partially out of the water, while in an Irish port during World War I. Moored to Bushnell's port side are (from left to right):
L-4 (SS-43),
L-1 (SS-40),
& L-9 (SS-49).
National Archives Identifier: 45513749
Local Identifier: 165-WW-338B-28
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
Photo added 06/14/17.
L-4 63k L-4 (SS-43), at Berehaven, Ireland. The L-4 was based here beginning 27 January 1918. USN photo contributed by Mike Green.
L-4 113k L-4 (SS-43), crew photo, circa 1918, place unknown. Note L-2 (SS-41), just visible in the background. Vance Adams for his father, Lt. Vance Adams USN Ret (deceased).
L-4 407k Wartime photo of L-4 (SS-43) (on right) in drydock with another L-boat. National Archives Identifier: 45513765
Local Identifier: 165-WW-338B-036.
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
Photo added 06/16/17.
Maryland 572k AMERICAN SUBMARINES home again from foreign waters lying in the sheltered basin at League Island.
The tender Bushnell (AS-2) and three of her charges lie alongside. The L-4 (SS-43) lies inboard along with 2 of her sisters.
Image provided by: Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.,
Photo & text by Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 4 February 1919, Night Extra, Image 20, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
L-3/L-11/L-10/L-4/L-9 67k L-3 (SS-42), L-11 (SS-51), L-10 (SS-50), L-4 (SS-43) and L-9 (SS-49), alongside their tender in Great Britain during World War I.
They display the most important war modifications: the permanent open chariot bridge & retractable (housing) periscopes. L-10 shows three fixed-spot hydrophones forward, presumably comprising a K-tube.
Partial text courtesy of U.S. Submarines Through 1945, An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman. Naval Institute Press. USN photo NH 60252, from the collections of the US Naval Historical Center.
SS-50,40, 49 &  4380k L-boats alongside Bushnell (AS-2) at Bantry Bay, Ireland, in 1918. These submarines are, from left to right:
unidentified submarine;
L-1 (SS-40),
L-10 (SS-50),
L-4 (SS-43) &
L-9 (SS-49).
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph, # NH 51171.
SS-50,40, 49 &  4387k L-boats alongside Bushnell (AS-2) at Bantry Bay, Ireland, in 1918. These submarines are, from left to right:
unidentified submarine;
L-1 (SS-40),
L-10 (SS-50),
L-4 (SS-43) &
L-9 (SS-49).
Note the smoke from the submarines' engines.
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph, # NH 51170.
L-4, 10 & 11 61k Bushnell (AS-2) at anchor in Bantry Bay, Ireland, 1918. The submarines alongside are (from left to right): L-4 (SS-43); L-11 (SS-51); and L-10 (SS-50). USN photo # NH 52856, from the collections of the US Naval Historical Center. Collection of Rear Admiral Harold F. Pullen, USN. Loaned via Captain Paul B. Ryan, USN (Retired), 1977.
SS-50,40,  &  4383kThese submarines are, from left to right:
L-4 (SS-43)&
L-10 (SS-50),
L-1 (SS-40).
At the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania, soon their 1 February 1919 return to the U.S. from European waters. Note what appears to be a very long "homeward bound" pennant flying from the top of L-1's (SS-40), periscope.
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph, # NH 51158.
SS-50,40,  &  4383kThese submarines are, from left to right:
L-4 (SS-43),
L-10 (SS-50),
L-1 (SS-40).
At the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania, soon their 1 February 1919 return to the U.S. from European waters. Note chevrons painted on the submarines' fairwaters, signifying World War I overseas service.
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph, # NH 51144.
SS-50,40,  &  4383k These submarines are, from left to right:
L-4 (SS-43),
L-10 (SS-50),
L-1 (SS-40).
At the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania, soon their 1 February 1919 return to the U.S. from European waters. Ship in the immediate background is either Quinnebaug (ID-1687) or Saranac (ID-1702), with the other of the two beyond her.
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph, # NH 51142.
SS-50,40,  &  43104kThese submarines are, from left to right:
L-4 (SS-43)&
L-10 (SS-50),
L-1 (SS-40).
At the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania, soon after their 1 February 1919 return to the U.S. from European waters. Ship in the immediate background is either Quinnebaug (ID-1687) or Saranac (ID-1702), with the other of the two beyond her.
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph, # NH 51143.
L-4 & 11 59k L-11 (SS-51), at left, and L-4 (SS-43) at the U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, circa 1919. Note these submarines' 3"/23 deck guns, located just forward of their fairwaters. L-11's is retracted, while that of L-4 is in operating position. USN photo # NH 103253, from the collections of the US Naval Historical Center. Collection of Rear Admiral Harold F. Pullen, USN. Loaned via Captain Paul B. Ryan, USN (Retired), 1977.
SS-18, 19, 40, 43 & 50832kD-3 (SS-19), at left, and D-2 (SS-18) center at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania, 5 March 1919, with shipyard workmen on board. Note the ventilating fans on D-3's deck. A derrick barge is alongside D-2. Among the four submarines visible in the background are L-1 (SS-40), L-4 (SS-43) and L-10 (SS-50). A motorcycle is parked at the far left. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 51157.
L-boats 705k Submarines right to left are L-3 (SS-42), L-4 (SS-43) & L-1 (SS-40) to Constitution at Boston Navy Yard, circa 1918-20.Photo i.d. courtesy of Ric Hedmen.
Photo # 08_06_023224 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
L-boats 1.12k Submarines left to right are L-3 (SS-42), L-4 (SS-43) & L-1 (SS-40) of the Constitution at Boston Navy Yard, circa 1918-20.Photo courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.

View the L-4 (SS-43)
DANFS history entry located on the Haze Gray & Underway Web Site.
Crew Contact And Reunion Information
Not Applicable to this Vessel
Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
PigBoats.COM TM, a Historic Look at Submarines

Back To The Main Photo Index Back To the Submarine Index
Problems and site related matters, E-mail Webmaster
This page is created and maintained by Michael Mohl
1996 - 2017, NavSource History All rights reserved.