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NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Contributed by Mike Smolinski

V-5 (SC-1)
Narwhal (SS-167)

Radio Call Sign: November - India - Charlie - Victor

Narwhal Class Submarine: Laid down, 10 May 1927, at Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, ME; Launched, 17 December 1929; Commissioned Cruiser Submarine USS V-5 (SC-1), 15 May 1930; Renamed Narwhal (SS-167), 19 February 1931; Decommissioned, 23 April 1945, at Philadelphia, PA.; Struck from the Naval Register, 19 May 1945; Final Disposition, sold for scrapping. Narwhal received 15 battle stars for World War II service.

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 2,730 t., Submerged: 3,960 t.; Length 371' ; Beam 33' 3"; Draft 15' 9"; Speed, Surfaced 17 kts, Submerged 8 kts; Depth Limit 300'; Complement 8 officers 80 enlisted; Armament, four 21" torpedo tubes forward, two 21" torpedo tubes aft, four 21" torpedo tubes topside, 24 torpedoes; two single 6"/53 deck gun, two 30 cal. mgs.; Propulsion, diesel electric, Maschinfabrik - Augusburg- Nurnburg, New York Navy Yard diesel engines, hp 3175, Fuel Capacity, 182,778 gal., Westinghouse Electric Co., electric motors, hp 2500, Battery Cells 240, twin propellers.
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SS 167 580k V-5 (SC-1) half finished at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, 1927. USN photo courtesy of Robert Hurst.
SS 167 82k Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine.
Waterfront and covered shipways, circa summer-fall 1927. V-4 (SM-1) and V-5 (SC-1) are under construction in inside shipways building. V-4 (SC-1) later renamed Argonaut (SM-1), is on the nearer way and appears to be nearly ready for her launching, which took place on 10 November 1927. V-5 (SC-1) later renamed Narwhal is in a much earlier stage of construction, having been laid down on 10 May 1927. S-13 (SS-118) and another S-boat are alongside the waterfront, at left. Note automobiles parked in the center and right.
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph, USNHC # NH 70910. Courtesy of Lieutenant Gustave Freret, USN (Retired), 1970.
SS 165 1.00k Mrs. Charles Francis Adams christens the V-5 (SC-1) in Portsmouth, N.H. Navy Yard during blinding snowstorm in Portsmouth, N.H. Navy Yard, 17 December 1929. Photo courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
SS 165 916k Sub V-5 (SC-1) being launched in Portsmouth, N.H. Navy Yard. Photo courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
SS 167 928k V-5 (SC-1) starts her slide down the ways at Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, N.H., on 17 December 1929. USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
SS 165 989k Sub V-5 (SC-1) being launched in Portsmouth, N.H. Navy Yard, 17 December 1929. Photo courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
SS 165 654k V-5 (SC-1) and the snow storm that greeted her launching docked in Portsmouth, N.H. Navy Yard, 17 December 1929. Photo courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
SS 167 831k V-5 (SC-1) bow view from dock, 2 April 1930. USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
SS 167 1.58k V-5 (SC-1) underway, circa 1930. USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
SS 168 94k Nautilus (SS-168), Argonaut (SS-166); and Narwhal (SS-167); (listed left to right) Tied up together in port, circa the early 1930s.
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph, USNHC # NH 45667, courtesy of J.A. Casoly.
SS 167 72k Nautilus (SS-168);
Argonaut (SM-1); and
Narwhal (SS-167); (listed left to right)
Tied up together in port, circa the early 1930s.
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph, USNHC # NH 45668, courtesy of J.A. Casoly.
SS 167 109k Early 1930's photo of the Narwhal (SS-167). She was one of two crusier submarines inspired by the German U-cruisers of WW I, armed with 6in/53 guns. Her high freeboard reflects great reserve buoyancy. Text courtesy of U.S. Submarines Through 1945, An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman. Naval Institute Press. Photo courtesy of Hyperwar US Navy in WWII.
SS 167 124k Circa 1931 - 41 photo of the Narwhal (SS-167). USN photo courtesy of John L. Ross.
SS 163 89k Barracuda (SS-163) inboard & Narwhal (SS-167) tied up circa early 1930's, possibly at San Francisco. Photo courtesy of Jerry Crow.
Argonaut 202k Crew of a Barracuda class (SS-163/5) gather on deck for a group picture at Pearl Harbor prior to 1928. The Barracudas had their 5"/51 cal guns replaced in 1928 with smaller 3"/50's. She still has the larger 5"/51 cal gun. The crew is seated on the forward gun deck and the gun itself is raised to its max elevation to give the crew the room to gather. To the right of the boat is the submarine Narwhal (SS-167). Text courtesy of David Johnston (USNR). Photo i.d. courtesy of Dave Decrevel, John Hart, Ric Hedman & David Johnston (USNR). Photo courtesy of Doug Sheley via flickr.com.
SS 164 1.32k Submarines at San Pedro July to August 32 Olympics.
Inboard from left to right; Narwhal (SS-167), Nautilus (SS-168) & Bass (SS-164).
Back of the photo is labeled...to accomadate visitors?
Photo courtesy of John Pakusich & John Pat via David Way, Curator, Battleship Iowa BB 61, Pacific Battleship Center,250 S. Harbor Blvd., Berth 87, San Pedro, CA 90731
Winter & Pond 83k Tender and submarines at dock in Juneau, Alaska, July, 1934. At far left, tender Holland (AS-3), submarines (l to r) Bass (SS-164), Bonita (SS-165), Barracuda (SS-163), Nautilus (SS-168) and Narwhal (SS-167). The mill of the Alaska Juneau Gold Mining Company is in the background. Photo by Winter & Pond courtesy of the Alaska State Library. Submitted by Joe Radigan.
SS-170,169.163,164,165,168 & 167 86k Holland (AS-3) with seven submarines alongside, in San Diego harbor, California, 24 December 1934. The submarines are (from left to right):
Cachalot (SS-170);
Dolphin (SS-169);
Barracuda (SS-163);
Bass (SS-164);
Bonita (SS-165);
Nautilus (SS-168); and
Narwhal (SS-167).
OfficialUSN photo USNHC NH # 80-G-63334, now in the collections of the National Archives.
Argonaut417k Holland (AS-3) with seven submarines alongside, in San Diego harbor, California, possibly around 24 December 1934. The submarines are (from left to right):
Cachalot (SS-170);
Dolphin (SS-169);
Barracuda(SS-163);
Bass (SS-164);
Bonita (SS-165);
Nautilus (SS-168); and
Narwhal (SS-167)
USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Narwhal 78k Commemorative postal cover marking Narwhal 's (SS-167) fifth anniversary of commissioning, 15 May 1935. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Navy Day 78k Commemorative postal cover marking:
Bass (SS-164);
Dolphin (SS-169);
Porpoise (SS-172);
Argonaut (SS-169);
Nautilus (SS-168);
Cuttlefish (SS-171)
Barracuda (SS-163);
Narwhal (SS-167)
Bonita (SS-165); &
Cachalot (SS-170)
on Navy Day, 27 October 1935.
Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
SS-170,163,164,165,168 & 167 94k Holland (AS-3) in San Diego harbor, California, circa 1935. Submarines alongside are (from outboard to inboard):
Cachalot (SS-170);
Barracuda(SS-163);
Bass (SS-164);
Bonita (SS-165);
Nautilus (SS-168); and
Narwhal (SS-167).
Closest ship in the nest of destroyers at far right is Yarnall (DD-143).
Photograph NH # 82789, from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.
Narwhal 35k Commemorative postal cover & photo inset marking Narwhal 's (SS-167)
arrival at Pearl Harbor, 17 August 1936.
Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
SS-172 119k Holland (AS-3) circa 1936-1939, with seven submarines alongside, circa 1936-1939. These "boats" are, from left to right:
Nautilus (SS-168);
Narwhal (SS-167);
Shark (SS-174), marked "P3";
Dolphin (SS-169), marked "D1";
Porpoise (SS-172), marked "P1";
Pike (SS-173), marked "P2"; and
Tarpon (SS-175), marked "P4".
Photo NH # 3036, courtesy of U.S. Naval Historical Center.
SS-172 82k Holland (AS-3) circa 1936-1939, with seven submarines alongside, circa 1936-1939. These "boats" are, from left to right:
Nautilus (SS-168);
Narwhal (SS-167);
Shark (SS-174), marked "P3";
Dolphin (SS-169), marked "D1";
Porpoise (SS-172), marked "P1";
Pike (SS-173), marked "P2"; and
Tarpon (SS-175), marked "P4".
Photo NH # 3037, courtesy of U.S. Naval Historical Center.
SS-172 90k Holland (AS-3) circa 1936-1939, with seven submarines alongside, circa 1936-1939. These "boats" are, from left to right:
Nautilus (SS-168);
Narwhal (SS-167);
Shark (SS-174), marked "P3";
Dolphin (SS-169), marked "D1";
Porpoise (SS-172), marked "P1";
Pike (SS-173), marked "P2"; and
Tarpon (SS-175), marked "P4".
Photo NH # 3038, courtesy of U.S. Naval Historical Center.
SS-172 96k Holland (AS-3) circa 1936-1939, with seven submarines alongside, circa 1936-1939. These "boats" are, from left to right:
Nautilus (SS-168);
Narwhal (SS-167);
Shark (SS-174), marked "P3";
Dolphin (SS-169), marked "D1";
Porpoise (SS-172), marked "P1";
Pike (SS-173), marked "P2"; and
Tarpon (SS-175), marked "P4".
Photo NH # 3039, courtesy of U.S. Naval Historical Center.
SS 167 102k Pre war photo of the Narwhal (SS-167) towing a seaplane with engine trouble back to Pearl Harbor. USN photo courtesy of Robert Hurst.
SS 167 176k Pre war photo of the Narwhal (SS-167) underway in heavy seas. Photo and text from The World Encyclopedia of Submarines by John Parker courtesy of Robert Hurst.
Submarine Base,Pearl Harbor 1.14k Aerial view of the Submarine Base, Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii, with part of the supply depot beyond and the fuel farm at right, looking north on 13 October 1941. Note the fuel tank across the road from the submarine base, painted to resemble a building. The building beside the submarine ascent tower (in left center, shaped like an upside-down "U") housed the U.S. Fleet Headquarters at the time of the Japanese attack on 7 December 1941. Office of Admiral Husband E. Kimmel, the Fleet's Commander in Chief, was in the upper left corner of the building's top floor.
Wharton (AP-7) is in right foreground. Among the submarines at the base are Tuna (SS-203), Gudgeon (SS-211), Argonaut (SS-166), Narwhal (SS-167), Triton (SS-201) and Dolphin (SS-169). Holland (AS-3) and Niagara (PG-52) are alongside the wharf on the base's north side.
In the distance (nearest group in upper left) are the battleship Nevada (BB-36), at far left, Castor (AKS-1) and the derelict old mine-layer Baltimore. Cruisers in top center are Minneapolis (CA-36), closest to camera, and Pensacola (CA-24), wearing a Measure 5 painted "bow wave".
Text from USN photo # 80-G-451125, now in the collections of the National Archives.
USN photo # 80-G-651517 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
Photo added 04/18/16.
Submarine Base,Pearl Harbor 1.07k Two additional aerial views of the Submarine Base, Pearl Harbor, Oahu, Hawaii, with part of the supply depot beyond and the fuel farm at right, looking north on 13 October 1941. USN photo # 80-G-651516 & 651518 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
Photo added 04/18/16.
SS 167 64k Pearl Harbor attack, 7 December 1941, looking toward the Navy Yard from the Submarine Base during the attack. Submarine in the left foreground is Narwhal (SS-167). In the distance are several cruisers, with large cranes and 1010 Dock in the right center. Note Sailors in the center foreground, wearing web pistol belts with their white uniforms.
Submitted by Scott Baker, US National Archives photo # 80-G-32704, a USN photo now in the collections of the US National Archives.
SS 167 28k Another view of the Pearl Harbor attack, looking toward the Navy Yard from the Submarine Base. Narwhal (SS-167) is at left secured to a dock. Notice the Japanese plane overhead. USN photo submitted by John Hummel.
SS 167 53k Oil/alkyd on canvas by the artist John Meeks entitled "Pearl".
Just a few minutes after America's unexpected and violent entry World War II, this painting depicts the scene at the submarine base with Dolphin (SS-169) (to the left) and Narwhal (SS-167) acquitting themselves to the best of their abilities, and honorably, during the first wave of the attack.
In the background, a pall of smoke rises from the disaster that has befallen "Battleship Row" and the Navy Yard, and Japanese "Kate" torpedo bombers race in from the south to add to the mayhem.
A lone "Kate", its torpedo already spent, circles - perhaps to take photographs. As it crosses astern of the moored submarines, their hastily prepared anti-aircraft fire scores a hit and it sustains fatal damage. Credit for the 'kill' is shared by Narwhal, Tautog (SS-199) and a destroyer (- although in detailed battle reports, the skipper of Dolphin claims the victory...).
Photo & text courtesy of subart.net.
ARD-8 50k ARD-8 overhead view with Narwhal (SS-167) in her dock, date unknown, probably at Pearl Harbor. Photo courtesy of Susan Bloom for her uncle Raymond Rucker USS ARD-8. Photo i.d. courtesy of Ric Hedman.
SS 167 97k Narwhal (SS-167) was, in effect, a cruiser version of Argonaut (SS-166) but without the special mine tubes. She is shown, as modified during WW II, with superstructure platforms for 20-mm guns & wartime-type open periscope shears. Note how her ship's boats were recessed into the deck forward of her 6-in guns. The added torpedo tubes under the deck guns are indicated in the plan view.
As in Argonaut, pumps and the forward (battery-charging) engines occupied the spaces below the control room, which had a galley at its fore end. Abaft the control room were the crew's mess & CPO quarters above the after battery and the after 6-inch magazine. Officer's quarters were above the forward battery & the forward 6-in magazine.
In contrast to Argonaut , the maneuvering room was moved aft, above the motor room, which was abaft the big engine room. The small space abaft it, forward of the after torpedo room, was crew's quarters. The crew was also accommodated in the space between the forward torpedo room and the officer's quarters.
Photo & text courtesy of U.S. Submarines Through 1945, An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman. Naval Institute Press.
SS 167 164k Plan view aft of the Narwhal (SS-167) shows war modifications in these Mare Island photographs taken on 28 March 1943. Circled changes include two external tubes forward, several 20-mm antiaircraft guns, & masts for SJ (forward) & SD (aft) radars. The boat was also fitted with external stern tubes right aft. USN photo # 2093-43, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker. Text courtesy of U.S. Submarines Through 1945, An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman. Naval Institute Press.
SS 167 179k Narwhal (SS-167) shows war modifications in these Mare Island photographs taken on 28 March 1943. Circled changes include two external tubes forward, several 20-mm antiaircraft guns, & masts for SJ (forward) & SD (aft) radars. The boat was also fitted with external stern tubes right aft. USN photo # 2094-43, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker. Text courtesy of U.S. Submarines Through 1945, An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman. Naval Institute Press.
SS 167 166k Mare Island workers are conducting an inclining experiment on the Narwhal (SS-167) on 28 March 1943. USN photo # 2095-43, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
SS 167 90k Bow view of the Narwhal (SS-167) in the Mare Island channel on 3 April 43. USN photo # 2307-43, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
SS 167 90k Narwhal (SS-167), as modified, shown here on 3 April 1943 off Mare Island. Her SD radar mast is raised. Note the external tubes forward & right aft. The boat was also fitted with external stern tubes right aft. USN photo # 2309-43, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker. Text courtesy of U.S. Submarines Through 1945, An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman. Naval Institute Press.
Fremantle 101k Busy pier scene at Fremantle Austraila 19 December 1943. From left to right, stern view to the camera are the Bonefish (SS-223), Rasher (SS-269), Bowfin (SS-287), Bluefish (SS-222), Narwhal (SS-167) and the sub tender Pelias (AS-14).
Second row, bow view are the Cod (SS-224), Tinosa (SS-283) and Crevalle (SS-291).
I believe the only time that photo could have been taken was 19 December 1943. The Tinosa was in Fremantle only once, from 16 December 1943 to 10 January 1944. During that brief window, the Bonefish had not arrived until 19 December and the Rasher departed 19 December so that is the single date all three submarines were ever in Fremantle port at the same time.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Dan Goodell.
USN photo courtesy of Ric Hedman.
Cisco 38k 3 March 1944:20 miles NE of Dapitan, Mindanao. Cdr (later KIA on Lagarto (SS-371) Frank D. Latta's Narwhal (SS-167) torpedoes Karatsu [ex-U.S. river gunboat Luzon (PR-7)]at 08-55N, 123-20E. The torpedo blows Karatsu's bow off back to the bridge. Narwhal is heavily depth charged, but undamaged. Karatsu is towed to Cebu and later towed to Manila for repairs. Her repairs commence at the No. 103 Repair Facility at Cavite. Text courtesy of combinedfleet.com via Tommy Trampp.
U.S. Naval Institute photo,Dudley Knox Library
Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey Ca.,Yangtze River Patrol Memorial Exhibit.
SS 167 65k Watercolor on paper by the artist Perry Stirling entitled "Narwhal (SS-167).
This painting shows her on her 12th war patrol in June, 1944, when she surfaced off Bula Ceram island in the South Pacific, and pounded the gasoline storage facilities and pumping station with 56 rounds from her 6-inch guns, leaving the facilities ablaze.
Photo & text courtesy of subart.net.
Fremantle 365k This plaque was unveiled 20 March 1995 by His Excellency Major General P.M. Jeffery OA MC, Govenor of Western Australia to commemeorate the sacrifices made by Allied submarined that operated out of Fremantle, Western Australia during WW II. Photo courtesy of Ron Reeves.
SS 167 283k Narwhal 's (SS-167) deck guns at NSB New London, CT., March 2009. Photo courtesy of David Johnston.

View the V-5 (SC-1) / Narwhal (SS-167)
DANFS history entry located on the Haze Gray & Underway
Crew Contact And Reunion Information
U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation
Fleet Reserve Association

Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
Ep-21 (1) - Victory At Sea ~ Full Fathom Five - HQ
PigBoats.COM TM, A Historic Look at Submarines.


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