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NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Patches courtesy of Don McGrogan BMCS, USN (ret.)

Squalus / Sailfish (SS-192)

Radio Call Sign: November - India - Delta - Zulu

Unit Awards, Campaign and Service Medals and Ribbons


Presidential Unit Citation
Sargo Class Submarine: Laid down, 18 October 1937, at Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, ME.; Launched, 14 September 1938; Commissioned, USS Squalus (SS-192), 1 March 1939; Sunk by mechanical failure, 23 May 1939; Refloated, 13 September 1939; Decommission, 15 November 1939, at Portsmouth Navy Yard, Portsmouth, NH; Recommissioned, USS Sailfish (SS-192), 15 May 1940; Decommissioned, 27 October 1945; Struck from the Naval Register, 30 April 1948; Final Disposition, sold for scrapping, 18 June 1948, to Luria Brothers, Philadelphia, PA. Sailfish was awarded nine battle stars for service in the Pacific and received the Presidential Unit Citation.

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 1,400 t., Submerged: 2,350 t.; Length 310' 6" ; Beam 27' 1"; Draft 13' 8"; Speed, Surfaced 20 kts, Submerged 7.75 kts; Complement 5 Officers, 50 Enlisted; Maximum Depth Limit, 250'; Armament, eight 21" torpedo tubes, 24 torpedoes, one 3"/50 deck gun, two .50 cal machine guns, two .30 cal machine guns; Propulsion, diesel-electric engines, GE diesel engines, HP 5500, Fuel Capacity, 190,000 gals., GE motors, HP 2740, 252 battery cells. twin screws.
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Squalus 52k Squalus acanthias, one of the spiny sharks (dogfish sharks) scientifically known as Squalidal. Courtesy of photolib.noaa.gov via wikipedia.org.
Squalus 22k Commemorative postal cover on the occasion of the keel laying of the Squalus (SS-192), 18 October 1937, at Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, ME. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Squalus 147k Squalus (SS-192), under construction on the building ways at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine, 7 January 1938. View looks aft, showing typical cross section of pressure hull and side tanks. Frame 41 lower structure is in the foreground, with Frame 46 upper hull structure beyond. US National Archives photo # 19-N-109864, from the Bureau of Ships Collection now in the collections of the US Naval Archives.
Squalus 152k Squalus (SS-192), under construction on the building ways at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine, 7 January 1938. View looks forward, showing typical cross section of pressure hull and side tanks. Frame 155 lower structure is in the foreground, with Frame 145 upper hull structure beyond and Bulkhead 134 visible within the hull. US National Archives photo # 19-N-109863, from the Bureau of Ships Collection now in the collections of the US Naval Archives.
Squalus 144k Squalus (SS-192), under construction on the building ways at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine, 7 April 1938. View looks aft, with forward torpedo tube supporting structure in the foreground. US National Archives photo # 19-N-109861, from the Bureau of Ships Collection now in the collections of the US Naval Archives.
Squalus 154k Squalus (SS-192), under construction on the building ways at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine, 7 April 1938. View looks aft, with forward torpedo tube supporting structure in the foreground. US National Archives photo # 19-N-109862, from the Bureau of Ships Collection now in the collections of the US Naval Archives.
Squalus 139k Squalus (SS-192), under construction on the building ways at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine, 5 July 1938. View looks aft with forward torpedo tube supporting structure in the lower foreground. US National Archives photo # 19-N-109865, from the Bureau of Ships Collection now in the collections of the US Naval Archives.
Squalus 136k Squalus (SS-192), under construction on the building ways at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine, 5 July 1938. View looks forward from over the stern. US National Archives photo # 19-N-109866, from the Bureau of Ships Collection now in the collections of the US Naval Archives.
Squalus 274k Launching ramp & platform for the Squalus (SS-192), 14 September 1938. US Navy photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Squalus - Sailfish 432k General view of the Squalus (SS-192) looking forward, prior to launching on the building ways at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine, on 14 September 1938. US Navy photo # 448-39, courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Squalus - Sailfish 273k The launching of the Squalus (SS-192), at 3;15 PM on 14 September 1938. Photo courtesy of onr.navy.mil (Office of Naval Research) & submitted by Bill Gonyo.
Squalus 216k Have tug, will travel: Squalus (SS-192) gets ready for a push following launching on 14 September 1938. US Navy photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Squalus - Sailfish 273k Before berth photo: Tugs maneuvering the Squalus (SS-192) for docking at berth # 1 after launch on 14 September 1938. US Navy photo # 326-39, courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Squalus - Sailfish 257k Before berth photo: Tugs maneuvering the Squalus (SS-192) for docking at berth # 1 after launch on 14 September 1938. US Navy photo # 326-39, courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Squalus 15k Commemorative postal cover on the occasion of the launching of the Squalus (SS-192), 14 September 1938. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Squalus 43k Commemorative postal cover on the occasion of the launching of the Squalus (SS-192), 14 September 1938. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Squalus 78k Squalus (SS-192), fitting out, at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine, 5 October 1938. This view looks forward from off the starboard quarter, with propeller guard and stern torpedo tube doors at left. YO-13 is in the left background. US National Archives photo # 19-N-109859, from the Bureau of Ships Collection now in the collections of the US Naval Archives.
Squalus 190k Squalus (SS-192), fitting out, at Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, ME., 5 October 1938. US National Archives photo # 19-N-109858, from the Bureau of Ships Collection now in the collections of the US Naval Archives.
Squalus 216k Squalus (SS-192), fitting out, at Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, ME., 7 January 1939. US National Archives photo # 19-N-109860, from the Bureau of Ships Collection now in the collections of the US Naval Archives.
Squalus 15k Commemorative postal cover on the occasion of the commissioning of the Squalus (SS-192), 1 March 1939. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Squalus 120k Commemorative postal cover on the occasion of the commissioning of the Squalus (SS-192), 1 March 1939. Courtesy of Tommy Trammp.
Photo added 07/20/14.
Squalus 973k Photo entitled "Survivors of Squalus (SS-192) Sunk May 23, 1939."
Note that she does not have limber holes at all.
The date of the photo would have to be between 1 March 1939 (original commissioning) and 23 May 1939 (date of sinking) and most likely was taken in the Piscataqua River while she was headed out or returning from her initial sea trials.
An unsigned photo is seen here.
US Navy photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com & Wendy S. Gulley, Archivist, Submarine Force Museum,Naval Submarine Base, NLON, Groton, CT.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Dave Johnston (USNR).
Squalus 125k The Squalus (SS-192) hits the bottom of the ocean stern first off the coast of Portsmouth New Hampshire to rest in 240 feet of water. Thirty-three of the 59 crew members survived in the forward chambers of the submarine. This picture depicts the control room of the submarine and crew members desperately closing off water leaks. US Naval Historical Center / "Moment of Impact"
John Groth #1, Watercolor & ink, 1966 88-161-QS.
Squalus 30k Squalus (SS-192) Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Oliver F. Naquin.
Squalus's Christmas tree was green when she dived.
Photo courtesy of Lane Memorial Library (library@hampton.lib.nh.us)via Bill Gonyo.
PDF courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
PDF added 11/27/13.
Squalus 49k Ensign Joseph Hester Patterson, USN. Photograph taken 13 October 1937, while he was serving in Louisville (CA-28).
Ensign Patterson was lost in the accidental sinking of Squalus (SS-192) on 23 May 1939.
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 47425 courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
Squalus 101k Squalus (SS-192) crewmembers huddle around a lamp in the forward torpedo room awaiting rescue in cold conditions which resulted in some survivors suffering from exposure. However, no permanent adverse health effects were noted in survivors after the rescue. US Naval Historical Center / "Sweating It Out" (Torpedo Room)
John Groth #2, Watercolor & ink, 1966 88-161-QT.
Squalus 85k The rescue divers were indispensable in the rescue and subsequent salvage operation of the Squalus (SS-192), making a total of 648 deep-water tethered dives. They dived first to the wreck, where they anchored guide wires for the rescue bell to the escape hatch on the submarine. When the rescue bell became fouled on the 4th rescue trip, they attempted to unfoul the lines and get it to the surface. Each dive entailed considerable risk for the divers due to risk from the bends and "narcosis of the deep," a hallucinatory condition. US Naval Historical Center / USS Squalus and Diver
John Groth #4, Watercolor & ink, 1966 88-161-QV.
Squalus 80k On the 4th rescue dive of the McCann diving bell, the steel wire used to raise the bell to the surface became fouled. The bell was lowered to the ocean floor and divers sent down in an unsuccessful attempt to unfoul the wire. The bell was subsequently raised through the manipulation of bouyancy in the ballast tanks, and manual hauling to the surface. US Naval Historical Center / USS Squalus and Diving Bell
John Groth #7, Watercolor & ink, 1966 88-161-QY.
Squalus 112k 1939 vintage photograph, which was widely used to represent Squalus (SS-192) at the time of her sinking in May of that year. This is actually a photo of Salmon (SS-182), retouched to change Salmon's side number (SS-1) to that of Squalus (SS-11). See Photo # NH 63417 for the original, unretouched image. Photograph # NH 57510 from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives, courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus 77k Squalus (SS-192) Rescue Operations, May 1939. Wandank (AT-26), at left, and Falcon (ASR-2) moored over the sunken Squalus during rescue operations, circa 24 May 1939. The McCann Rescue Chamber, which brought 33 of the submarine's crewmen to safety, is visible on Falcon's (ASR-2) after deck. Photograph # NH 57508 from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives, courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus 118k Squalus's (SS-192) Commanding Officer, Lieutenant Oliver F. Naquin (center, hatless, wearing khaki pants), with other survivors on board the Coast Guard Cutter Harriet Lane, bound for the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine, following their rescue, 25 May 1939. Photograph # NH 85832 from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives, from the collections of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus 212k Airplane view of the salvage tug Falcon (ASR-2) on its way to rescue the crew of the sunken Squalus (SS-192). Photo # 08_06_023257 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
Squalus 449k Salvage tug Falcon (ASR-2) to the rescue of crew of the sunken sub Squalus (SS-192). Photo # 08_06_023270 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
Squalus 749k Rescue chamber on the salvage tug Falcon (ASR-2) to be used to rescue crew from sunken Squalus (SS-192). Photo # 08_06_023266 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
Squalus 761k A diver descends from the Falcon (ASR-2). Photo # 08_06_023268 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
Squalus 846k Stern view of the Falcon (ASR-2) with the McCann Rescue chamber Squalus (SS-192). Photo # 08_06_023271 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
Squalus 94k Squalus (SS-192) salvage pontoons near Falcon (ASR-2), during salvage operations on the sunken submarine, off the New Hampshire coast in the Summer of 1939. Photograph # USN 1149032 from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives, courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus 137k McCann Rescue Chamber in the water alongside Falcon (ASR-2) during the rescue of 33 men still alive and trapped in the sunken submarine Squalus (SS-192), off the New Hampshire coast, circa 24-25 May 1939. The submarine sank when the main induction valve in the engine room stuck in the open position, flooding her after compartments when she submerged. Official U.S. Navy Photograph # NH 97292, courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus 159k McCann Rescue Chamber cutaway drawing of the device used to rescue 33 crewmen from the sunken submarine Squalus' (SS-192) in May 1939. Official U.S. Navy Photograph # NH 97291, courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus 87k U.S. Coast Guard Cutter Harriet Lane landing the first nine Squalus (SS-192) survivors at the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine, on 24 May 1939. Some of the surviors are visible in center, wrapped in blankets. They had been recovered from the sunken submarine by a McCann Rescue Chamber deployed from Falcon (ASR-2). Squalus had sunk in the Atlantic, off Portsmouth, on the previous day. Official U.S. Navy Photograph # NH 57505, courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus 68k Scene on the after deck of Falcon (ASR-2) during the early stages of the salvage operations, 30 May 1939, showing congested conditions. View looks to port, with men assisting a diver toward the left. Officer behind them, in center, appears to be Commander Allan R. McCann. Photographed by the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine. Official U.S. Navy Photograph # NH 57501, courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center & submitted by Bill Gonyo.
Squalus 137k Precolating water rises from the salvage pontoons during salvage operations on the sunken submarine, off the New Hampshire coast in the Summer of 1939. US Navy photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Squalus 115k A salvage pontoon surfaces during an attempt to lift Squalus (SS-192) from the sea bottom off the New Hampshire coast, in the Summer of 1939. The bow of Falcon (ASR-2) is at the extreme left. This appears to be the 13 July 1939 lift, in which Squalus' bow rose uncontrollably to the surface and then sank. If that is the case, the pontoon visible here is probably the upper pontoon of the lifting lines attached to the sunken submarine's bow. Official U.S. Navy Photograph # USN 1149024, courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus 129k A salvage pontoon surfaces during an attempt to lift Squalus (SS-192) from the sea bottom off the New Hampshire coast, in the Summer of 1939. The bow of Falcon (ASR-2) is at the extreme left. This appears to be the 13 July 1939 lift, in which Squalus' bow rose uncontrollably to the surface and then sank. If that is the case, the pontoon visible here is probably the upper pontoon of the lifting lines attached to the sunken submarine's bow. Official U.S. Navy Photograph # USN 1149027, courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus 125k A salvage pontoon surfaces during an attempt to lift Squalus (SS-192) from the sea bottom off the New Hampshire coast, in the Summer of 1939. The bow of Falcon (ASR-2) is at the extreme left. This appears to be the 13 July 1939 lift, in which Squalus' bow rose uncontrollably to the surface and then sank. If that is the case, the pontoon visible here is probably the upper pontoon of the lifting lines attached to the sunken submarine's bow. Official U.S. Navy Photograph # USN 1149025, courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus 128k Squalus' (SS-192) bow comes to the surface, during an attempt to lift her from the sea bottom off the New Hampshire coast, in the Summer of 1939. This appears to be the 13 July 1939 lift, in which Squalus' bow rose uncontrollably to the surface and then sank. If that is the case, the four salvage pontoons visible here are probably the two pontoons of the lifting lines attached to the submarine's bow, and the upper two pontoons of the stern lifting lines. Official U.S. Navy Photograph # USN 1149029, courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus 104k Squalus' (SS-192) bow comes to the surface as personnel based on Falcon (ASR-2) struggle to refloat the sunken submarine, off the New Hampshire coast during the Summer of 1939. This appears to be the 13 July 1939 lift, in which Squalus' bow rose uncontrollably to the surface and then sank. If that is the case, the salvage pontoons nearby would include both bow line pontoons, plus the two upper pontoons on the stern lifting line. The ship's hull number ("192") is painted on her bow. Photograph # USN 1149026, from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives,courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus 795k Squalus' (SS-192) bow comes to the surface as personnel based on Falcon (ASR-2) struggle to refloat the sunken submarine, off the New Hampshire coast during the Summer of 1939. This appears to be the 13 July 1939 lift, in which Squalus' bow rose uncontrollably to the surface and then sank. If that is the case, the salvage pontoons nearby would include both bow line pontoons, plus the two upper pontoons on the stern lifting line. The ship's hull number ("192") is painted on her bow.
The abortive surfacing wrecked 13,600 feet of air hoses running from the slavage ship to the pontoons to the ballast tanks of the submarine.
Partial text from War Under The Pacific, by K.Wheeler, and submitted courtesy of Robert Hurst.
Photo # 08_06_023262 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
Squalus 603k Raising the sub Squalus (SS-192) after accident. Photo # 08_06_023265 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
Squalus - Sailfish 213k The Squalus (SS-192) and her pontoon make way to Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine on 12 August 1939. US Navy photo # 326-39, courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Squalus 90k Blowing of salvage pontoons to lift Squalus' (SS-192) off the sea bottom, 12 August 1939. Photographed by the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine. Original photo is mis-identified as showing salvage of Sculpin (SS-191), which was present to support the operations, but was not the object of them. Official U.S. Navy Photograph # NH 42382, courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus 68k Air comes to the surface during blowing of salvage pontoons to lift Squalus (SS-192) off the sea bottom, 12 August 1939. There were separate groups of pontoons supporting the sunken submarine's bow and stern. Three pontoons were located at the top of the lift line in each location and surfaced during the 12 August lift. One more pontoon remained underwater on the bow line and three more on the stern line when this lift was completed. Photographed by the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine. Official U.S. Navy Photograph # NH 57898, courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus 59k Salvage pontoons surfacing as they lift Squalus (SS-192) off the sea bottom, 12 August 1939. There were separate groups of pontoons supporting the sunken submarine's bow and stern. Three pontoons were located at the top of the lift line in each location and surfaced during the 12 August lift. One more pontoon remained underwater on the bow line and three more on the stern line when this lift was completed. Photographed by the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine. Official U.S. Navy Photograph # NH 57899, courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus 126k Divers closing valves in salvage pontoons after Squalus (SS-192) had been lifted off the sea bottom, 12 August 1939. There were separate groups of pontoons supporting the sunken submarine's bow and stern. Three pontoons were located at the top of the lift line in each location, and came to the surface during the 12 August lift. One of these groups is seen here. After this lift, one more pontoon remained underwater on the bow line and three more on the stern line. Photographed by the Portsmouth Navy Yard, Kittery, Maine. Official U.S. Navy Photograph # NH 57897, courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus 90k View taken from Falcon (ASR-2) on 12 August 1939, after Squalus (SS-192) had been lifted off the sea bottom and was being towed to shallower water, supported by salvage pontoons. Wandank (AT-26) and a smaller tug (probably Penacook YT-6) are towing, while Falcon acted as restraining ship. There are groups of three pontoons each visible on the surface at the submerged submarine's bow and stern. One more pontoon was underwater at the bow and three more at the stern. Official U.S. Navy Photograph # NH 57509, courtesy of the US Naval Historical Center.
Squalus - Sailfish 17k One year commemorative postal cover dedicated to the memory of the crew of the Squalus (SS-192) who died at their posts when the boat sank by mechanical failure, 23 May 1939. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Squalus 88k Commemorative photo in honor of the memory of the crew of the Squalus (SS-192).Photo courtesy of Tom Kermen. Dante's Prayer courtesy of Loreena McKennitt via quinlanroad.com.
Squalus 344k Sec. of the Navy Edison presents Medal of Honor for heroism to four men during rescue and salvage operations during Squalus's (SS-192) sinking on 23 May 1939. The ceremonies took place at the Navy department on 19 January 1940.
Sec. of the Navy Edison also conducted a court of inquiry into her loss.
US Navy photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
PDF's added 11/27/13.
Squalus 2.30k Thirty six page PDF of the Squalus (SS-192) history & sinking on 23 May 1939. US Navy photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
PDF added 11/27/13.
Sailfish 12k Istiophorus platypterus, a Sailfish. Illustrated by Diane Rome Peebles. Photo courtesy of myfwc.com.
Squalus 134k The salvage pontoons proceed the sunken submarine to drydock. US Navy photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
192793kSqualus (SS-192) safe in dry dock at Portsmouth Navy Yard, 15 September 1939. Photo 08_06_023239 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
192611k Squalus (SS-192) damaged conning tower and pontoons, 15 September 1939. Photo 08_06_023243 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
Squalus 44k Damage to conning tower by lifting pontoons. Sub is still being pumped out. Photo from Milne Special Collections, University of New Hampshire Library, Durham, N.H. courtesy of Ric Hedman & pigboats.com.
1921.04kSqualus (SS-192) crew and salvage workers pumping out last of the water in Portsmouth Navy Yard after the sub was rinsed. Photo 08_06_023208 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
Squalus - Sailfish 441k Forward torpedo room of the Squalus (SS-192) after raising 15 September 1939. US Navy photo # 448-39, courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
192793kAfter 113 days of salvage work, the sub Squalus (SS-192) is moored at Pier 6 at the Portsmouth Navy Yard on 15 September 1939. Photo 08_06_023237 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
192793kSqualus (SS-192) at the Portsmouth Navy Yard. Photo 08_06_023238 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
192620kUntangling the ropes around the conning tower of the Squalus (SS-192) at Portsmouth Navy Yard, 15 September 1939. Photo 08_06_023250 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
192654kSqualus (SS-192) in Portsmouth Navy Yard showing pontoons keeping her afloat, 15 September 1939. Photo 08_06_023251 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
192629kNight falls on the Squalus (SS-192) at Portsmouth Navy Yard, 15 September 1939. Photo 08_06_023241 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
192464kSqualus (SS-192) completely afloat at Portsmouth Navy Yard, 15 September 1939. Photo 08_06_023244 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
Squalus 663k Squalus (SS-192) floats on even keel at Portsmouth Navy Yard after removal of bodies, 15 September 1939. Note the position of the bow planes and the condition of the fairwater. The damage caused by the salvage chains and pontoons is evident but hard to make out clearly. You can see how the bridge was crushed. Photo 08_06_023236 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
Photo i.d. courtesy of John Hart, Ric Hedman & Dave Johnston (USNR).
192793kSqualus (SS-192) conning tower dismantled at Portsmouth Navy Yard to get at bodies of the crew, 15 September 1939. Photo 08_06_023244 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
192745kSqualus (SS-192) tilted at awkward angle at Portsmouth Navy Yard, 15 September 1939. Photo 08_06_023246 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
192718kSqualus (SS-192) tilted at awkward angle at Portsmouth Navy Yard, 15 September 1939. Photo 08_06_023247 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
192475kLost in thought on deck of the Squalus (SS-192) at Portsmouth Navy Yard, 15 September 1939. Photo 08_06_023242 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
Squalus - Sailfish 450k Salvaging of the Squalus (SS-192) in dry-dock showing the general condition of the boat.
Notice that at this point in her life there were NO limber holes in the superstructure aft of the bow planes. Therefore, any photos of the boat without limber holes present had to have been taken prior to her sinking on 23 May 1939.
Text i.d. courtesy of Dave Johnston (USNR).
US Navy photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Squalus - Sailfish 223k Salvaging of the Squalus (SS-192) at dockside. US Navy photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Navy Day 21k Commemorative post mark on the occasion of the submarines
Sargo (SS-188),
Saury (SS-189),
Spearfish (SS-190),
Sculpin (SS-191),
Squalus (SS-192) &
Swordfish (SS-193) honoring Navy Day, 27 October 1939.
Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Squalus - Sailfish 32k Commemorative postal cover on the occasion of the de-commissioning of the Squalus (SS-192), 15 November 1939. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Squalus - Sailfish 24k Commemorative postal cover on the occasion of the de-commissioning of the Squalus (SS-192), 15 November 1939. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Squalus - Sailfish 181k The scene on the deck of the ill-fated U. S. Navy submarine Squalus (SS-192), 15 May 1940 as it was re commissioned under a new name---Sailfish, 15 May at the Portsmouth, N. H. Navy Yard today, 15 May. Lieutenant Commander John B. Longstaf, Aide to the Commandant at the Yard, read the orders of the Navy Department placing the submarine in commission and naming her Commander Lieut. Comm. Morton C. Mumma. The Squalus sank last 23 May off the Isles of Shoals, N. H., with a loss of 26 lives. Some of the survivors serve on the renamed sub. Photo courtesy of the National Historical Center via Bill Gonyo.
Squalus - Sailfish 281k The scene on the deck of the ill-fated U. S. Navy submarine Squalus (SS-192), 15 May 1940 as it was re commissioned under a new name---Sailfish, at the Portsmouth, N. H. Navy Yard.
Notice that she now carries a single row of small circular limber holes in the superstructure aft of the bow planes.
Any photo of the Sailfish that shows the row of small holes was taken sometime between her recommissioning on 15 May 1940 and a refit that she went through in September 1940. I believe that the post sea trials refit that she had that September to be the most logical time that the small holes were replaced with the large ones, obviously an effort to decrease dive times.
Text i.d. courtesy of Dave Johnston (USNR).
US Navy photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Squalus - Sailfish 70k Commemorative postal cover on the occasion of the re-commissioning of the Sailfish (SS-192), 15 May 1940. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Squalus - Sailfish 163k Re-introducing the Squalus (SS-192), on the occasion of her re-commissioning on 15 May 1940. Photo courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
Squalus - Sailfish 36k Commemorative postal cover on the occasion of the Sailfish's (SS-192) first submergence, 29 June 1940. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Squalus - Sailfish 160k Commemorative postal cover on the occasion of Squalus (SS-192) shakedown cruise with Lt. Comdr. Morton C. Mumma commanding on 18 November 1940. Photo courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
Squalus 455k Pre-war photo of the Sailfish (SS-192) underway, probably taken during her post recommissioning sea trials sometime in the summer of 1940, definitely prior to the refit that ended in September. She still has the row of small holes.
I believe this to be the Cape Cod Canal, Massachusetts.
Any photo of the Sailfish in her original configuration with the large limber holes present would have to be dated after September 1940 and the start of the war.
Photo courtesy of Arnold Putnam.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Dave Johnston (USNR) & Robert Morgan.
Squalus - Sailfish 181k Sailfish (SS-192) in New York City harbor, with the Porto Rico (that's how it is spelled in the photo) terminal buildings behind her, probably taken after her departure from Portsmouth, and during her transit south for Panama and the Pacific, most likely in January 1941. Probably a publicity stop of the famous boat and a chance for one last liberty call prior to leaving the east coast for good. She now carries a single row of large semi-circular limber holes.Text i.d. courtesy of Dave Johnston (USNR).
U.S. Navy photo contributed by Skip Riser.
Sealion68kCommander Richard George Voge served a four-month tour of duty as commissioning executive officer of Rowan (DD-405) from late September 1939 to late January 1940. In mid-February Comdr. Voge returned to the Asiatic Fleet and assumed command of Sealion (SS-195), based at Cavite in the Philippines, and commanded that submarine until the opening day of American participation in World War II. At the outbreak of hostilities on 8 December 1941 (West Longitude Time), Voge suffered the double ignominy of having his command caught in overhaul and, three days later, of losing her to enemy bombs while still at Cavite Navy Yard. Voge, however, quickly recovered from that blow, assumed command of Sailfish (SS-192) on 17 December 1941. Photo courtesy of the Lucky Bag yearbook Class of 1925 via Bill Gonyo.
Sailfish 90k Sailfish (SS-192) off the Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, CA., 13 April 1943. US National Archives photo # 19-N-43269, from the Bureau of Ships Collection.
Sailfish 90k Sailfish (SS-192) off the Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, CA., 13 April 1943. US National Archives photo # 19-N-43270, from the Bureau of Ships Collection.
Sailfish 90k Sailfish (SS-192) off the Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, CA., 13 April 1943, following an overhaul. US Navy photo # NH 97307, from the collections of the US Naval Archives.
Sailfish 90k Sailfish (SS-192) off the Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, CA., 13 April 1943, following an overhaul. US Navy photo # NH 97308, from the collections of the US Naval Archives.
Sailfish 90k Sailfish (SS-192) at the Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, CA., 13 April 1943, following an overhaul. Circles on the photograph identify recent alternations to the ship. Gilmore (DE-18) is in the left background. US National Archives photo # 19-N-43274, from the Bureau of Ships Collection.
Sailfish 95k Broadside view of the Sailfish (SS-192) off Mare Island on 13 April 1943. USN photo # 2566-43, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Sailfish 90k Sailfish (SS-192) at the Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, CA., 13 April 1943, following an overhaul. Circles on the photograph identify recent alternations to the ship. Note men in rowboat inspecting her limber holes, by the stubs of her removed propeller guards. Barges YF-200 and YF-190 are in the center background. US National Archives photo # 19-N-43273, from the Bureau of Ships Collection.
192897kAfter refit at Pearl Harbor, she departed on 17 November 1944 for her tenth patrol, which took her south of Honshu. Prior to arriving on station, after refueling at Midway, she intercepted a fast convoy of Japanese ships on the night of 3 December about 240 miles southeast of Yokosuka. The group consisted of a carrier, a cruiser, and two destroyers. Despite high seas whipped up by typhoon winds, shortly after midnight of the 4th, Sailfish (SS-192) maneuvered into firing position and fired a spread of three torpedoes at the carrier, scoring two hits. She went deep to escape the escorting destroyers, but resurfaced within a few hours to resume the attack. Before dawn, she fired another spread of three "fish," scoring two more hits on the stricken carrier. Eluding the Japanese ASW attack, which was hampered by the raging seas, Sailfish came to periscope depth at dawn and saw the carrier dead in the water, with a list to port and down by the stern. Preparations to abandon ship were in progress. Later in the morning, Sailfish fired another spread of three torpedoes, scoring two final hits. Loud internal explosions and breaking-up noises were heard, while the submarine went to test depth to escape a depth charge attack. Shortly afterwards, the carrier, Chuyo, went to the bottom. Text courtesy of DANFS.
Photo courtesy of wikimedia.org.
PDF courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Sailfish 16k Sailfish (SS-192), oil painting, unknown artist, circa 1943/45. Author's collection.
SS 154 192k Aft plan view of the S-43 (SS-154) at Bethlehem Shipbuilding in San Francisco on 26 January 1944. The scaffolding belongs to the Sailfish (SS-192) to the right; Shad (SS-235) is forward of S-43 (SS-154), and unknown covered barge is berthed between Shad and Sailfish. US Navy photo # 642-44 courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Dave Johnston (USNR).
Sailfish 90k Sailfish (SS-192) crew members pose by the after end of the conning tower, while Sailfish was at Naval Submarine Base, New London, Groton, CT., in 1945. Her Presidential Unit Citation flag is behind the periscope sheers, in upper center. Original photo is dated September 1945.
"The man kneeling on the left is Ray Bunt holding shell of a sea turtle he caught and the crew ate. Other crew shown are Joe McGrievy, in the Navy chief's hat, (left to right) Gail Lusk, Bob Kempf, and Troy Ray. The man standing on the smoking deck to the left of the flag staff is "William J. Dillon (known as "Skippy" on the Sailfish since I was the radioman,radarman, sonarman on board)" and provided the above identifications.
US National Archives photo # 80-G-700762. Thanks to William J. "Skippy" Dillon via Ric Hedman for supplying the names of his shipmates in this photo.
Squalus - Sailfish 230k Crowds line the shore 27 October 1945 at Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. The Sailfish (SS-192) was making one last pierside dive prior to decommissioning. US Navy photo # 326-39, courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com. Photo i.d. courtesy of David Johnston (USNR).
Memorial plaque91kMemorial plaque at Independence Seaport Museum, Philadelphia PA, July 2006 for the crews of United States submarines lost during peace time accidents:
F-1 (SS-20), F-4 (SS-23), G-2 (SS-27), H-1 (SS-28), O-5 (SS-66), O-9 (SS-70), S-4 (SS-109), S-51 (SS-162), Squalus (SS-192), Scorpion (SSN-589) & Thresher (SSN-593).
Photo courtesy of Wendell Royce McLaughlin Jr.
Sailfish 1.00k The sail of the Sailfish (SS-192) preserved as a memorial to its crew, at the US Navy's Portsmouth Naval Shipyard, Kittery, Maine. Photo courtesy of Charles A. Thompson.
Sailfish 892k This 2010 photo shows the gun access hatch in the after CT bulkhead, located inside the dog house of the Sailfish (SS-192). Photo i.d. courtesy of John Hummel. Photo courtesy of Charles A. Thompson.
Sailfish 697k This photo shows the hatch leading down to the conning tower from the bridge. Photo courtesy of Charles A. Thompson.
Sailfish 656k This is looking down and forward from the bridge. On the lower left the hatch to the conning tower below is visible, and on the right is the open door to the forward gun deck. Photo courtesy of Charles A. Thompson.
Sailfish 1.0k The after cigarette desk sloping down, with a couple of ready service lockers below the raised aft TDC platform. Photo courtesy of Charles A. Thompson.
Sailfish764kFour photo PDF of the Sailfish (SS-192). Photos courtesy of Mel Douyette @ coldwarsubmarines.com
Photos added 05/05/14.

View the Squalus / Sailfish (SS-192)
DANFS history entry located on the Haze Gray & Underway Web Site.
Crew Contact And Reunion Information
U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation
Fleet Reserve Association

Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
On Eternal Patrol
ComSubForPac USS SQUALUS (SS-192) 23 May 1939 - 26 Men Lost
They Brought Them Up Alive By Admiral Charles A. Lockwood & H.C. Adamson
PigBoats.COM TM - A Historic Look at Submarines
Ep-21 (1) - Victory At Sea ~ Full Fathom Five - HQ
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