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NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Patches contributed by Mike Smolinski

Tunny (SS-282)

Radio Call Sign: November - Charlie - Delta - India

Unit Awards, Campaign and Service Medals and Ribbons


Presidential Unit Citation
Gato Class Submarine: Laid down, 10 November 1941, at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, CA.; Launched, 30 June 1942; Commissioned USS Tunny (SS-282), 1 September 1942; Decommissioned, 13 December 1945; Laid up on 12 February 1946 in the Pacific Reserve Fleet, at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, CA.; Recommission, in reserve, 25 February 1952; Decommissioned on 30 April 1952; Reclassified on 18 July 1952; Recommissioned, 6 March 1953; On 15 July 1953, Tunny (SSG-282) launched successfully the first Regulus I fired from a submarine; Tunny reported to Pearl Harbor in 1957 and made 11 missile deterrent patrols in the Pacific between October 1959 and April 1964; After the Regulus I was phased out, she was converted to Guided Missile Submarine (SSG-282); Re-designated (SS-282) in May 1965; Converted to a Troop-carrying Submarine in 1966 and re-designated (APSS-282) on 1 October 1966; Reclassified Amphibious Transport Submarine (LPSS-282), 1 January 1969; Decommissioned, 28 June 1969; Struck from the Naval Register, 30 June 1969, and designated as a mobile target; Final Disposition, sunk as a target by Volador (SS-490), 19 June 1970. Tunny received nine battle stars and two Presidential Unit Citations for her World War II service, and five battle stars for her operations during the Vietnam War.
Partial data submitted by Yves Hubert.

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 1,526 t., Submerged: 2,424 t.; Length 311' 10"; Beam 27' 4"; Draft 16' 10"; Speed, Surfaced 20.25 kts, Submerged 8.75 kts; Complement 6 Officers 54 Enlisted; Operating Depth, 300 ft; Submerged Endurance, 48 hrs at 2 kts; Patrol Endurance 75 days; Cruising Range, 11,000 miles surfaced at 10 kts; Armament, could carry up to two Regulus I missiles, ten 21" torpedo tubes, six forward, four aft, 24 torpedoes, one 3"/50 deck gun, two .50 cal. machine guns, two .30 cal. machine guns; Propulsion, diesel electric reduction gear with four Fairbanks Morse main generator diesel engines, HP 5400, Fuel Capacity, 116,000 gals., four General Electric main motors, HP 2740, two 126-cell main storage batteries, twin propellers.
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Tunny 18kCommemorative postal cover on the occasion of the Tunny's (SS-282) keel being laid at Mare Island on 10 November 1941. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Tunny 22kCommemorative postal cover on the occasion of the Tunny's (SS-282) keel being laid at Mare Island on 10 November 1941. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Tunny 163k The honorary keel layers for the Tunny (SS-282) are pictured at Mare Island on 10 November 1941. Left to right: W. N. Simons, Chief Quarterman, Electric Shop & Robert F. Cooke, Foreman, Electric Shop.USN photo # 3017-41, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 238k Detailed Operating Schedule for Launching of the Tunny (SS-282) at Mare Island on 30 June 1942.USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 238k The Official Commandant's Order No. 25-42 for the launching of the Tunny (SS-282) on 30 June 42.USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 728kStern view of the Tunny (SS-282) on the building ways at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, CA., 30 June 1942.USN photo # MI-3628-42 courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org.
Tunny 171kMrs. Frederick G. Crisp (Sponsor) christens the Tunny (SS-282), at Mare Island on 30 June 1942. CDR Lemuel P. Padget (left) and RADM W. L. Friedell (right) assist Mrs. Crisp.USN photo # 3624-42, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 148k Mrs. Frederick G. Crisp (Sponsor) is pictured after Tunny's (SS-282) launching at Mare Island on 30 June 1942. USN photo # 3650-42, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 499kWorkers on the bow of the Tunny (SS-282) before she starts her slide down the building ways at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, CA., 30 June 1942.USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Tunny 575kTunny (SS-282) is about to slide down the building ways at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, CA., 30 June 1942.USN photo courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org.
Tunny 256kThe Tunny (SS-282) is at the end of the ways during her launching at Mare Island on 30 June 1942.USN photo # 3637-42, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 269kTunny (SS-282) waterborne after sliding down the building ways.USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Tunny 114kThe Tunny (SS-282) is seen being moved to her outfitting berth after her launching at Mare Island on 30 June 1942.USN photo # 3647-42, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Sunfish 319k Progress photo, stern view, at Mare Island on 2 July 1942.
The Tunny (SS-282) is alongside.
USN photo # BS 34397 via NARA College Park, courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Photo added 04/25/17.
Sunfish 115k The scene at the commissioning ceremony of the Sunfish (SS-281) at Mare Island on 15 July 1942. The Tunny (SS-282) is alongside. Official USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 243kCommissioning ceremonies aboard Tunny (SS-282) at Mare Island on 1 Sep 42. Sunfish (SS-281) is to the right and Whale (SS-239) is in front of the Tunny .USN photo # 5215-42, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 135kThe officers of the newly commissioned Tunny (SS-282) at Mare Island on 1 Sep 42. Lt. Comdr. Elton Watters Grenfell in command stands in the middle. USN photo # 5217-42, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 140kCommissioning ceremonies aboard Tunny (SS-282) at Mare Island on 1 Sep 42. USN photo 5220-42, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 121kThe Tunny (SS-282) seen off Mare Island on 1 Sep 1942. USN photo # 6840-42, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 132kThe Tunny (SS-282) seen off San Francisco on 6 November 42. USN photo # 6904-42, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 150kThe Tunny (SS-282) is seen off Mare Island on 6 November 1942. USN photo # 6903-42, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 319kAft port quarter view of Tunny (SS-282) off Mare Island on 5 December 1942. USN photo # 7524-12-42, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 918kOn 27 March 1943, Tunny (SS-282) arrived off Wake Island and operated within a 200-mile circle all day, flooding down the decks awash when within 30 miles of the island. Before dawn the next morning, she closed to within 10 miles of the Japanese-held island and watched as its awakening occupants turned on their lights. A motor torpedo boat and two patrol boats passed by less than 600 yards from the submarine without detecting her presence. trialing these vessels, Tunny came upon a cargo ship IJN Suwa Maru and all hands scrambled to battle stations. Shortly after sunrise, the submarine launched her attack, firing two torpedoes from a range of 700 yards. The first found its mark and blew the stern off the enemy ship, but the buoyancy of the lightly loaded vessel kept it afloat.
SS Suwa Maru was sunk by the Tunny on 28 March 1943.
Text courtesy of DANFS.
Image courtesy TedQuackenbush,{wikipedia.org) & combinedfleet.com via Robert Hurst.
Tunny 814kThree undated images of an unidentified Japanese Maru sinking in the Carolines after being torpedoed by Tunny.Photo from United States Submarine Operations in World War II, by Theodore Roscoe, courtesy of Robert Hurst.
Tunny 350k On 26 August 1943, during her fourth war patrol, Tunny (SS-282) underwent a severe depth charge attack off the Palau Islands. Two charges detonated close aboard the bow while the ship was submerged to a depth of 300 feet, causing extensive structural damage to the single hull plating and framing in way of the forward torpedo room and considerable other damage throughout the boat. Although depth control was temporarily lost, due to jammed bow planes and brief cutoff of main power, Tunny was able to remain submerged and make good her escape.
This report is based on the information contained in the references and on informal interviews with various officers attached to Tunny. The Photographs were furnished by C.O. Tunny, U.S. Naval Drydocks, Hunter's Point, and this Bureau. The PLATE was prepared by the Bureau and the structural indention's noted thereon are based on data contained in the enclosures to reference (c).
Photo & text courtesy of ibiblio.org.
Tunny 472kGeneral view of starboard side forward of the Tunny (SS-282) showing deformation in way of single hull and forward trim tank.Source: Navy Department Library, War Damage/Loss Report No.58, Tunny (SS-282) via Mike Green.
Tunny 205kGeneral view of port side forward of the Tunny (SS-282) showing deformation in way of single hull and forward trim tank. Source: Navy Department Library, War Damage/Loss Report No.58, Tunny (SS-282) via Mike Green.
Tunny 379kBow buoyancy tank structure deformation of the Tunny (SS-282). Note bent bow stem at 20' W.Source: Navy Department Library, War Damage/Loss Report No.58, Tunny (SS-282) via Mike Green.
Tunny 178k23 March 1944: I-42 departs Palau for a supply run to Rabaul, carrying a total of 102 hands. Her estimated time of arrival is 30 March. Cdr Ogawa zigzags on the surface at 18 knots.
At 2119, LtCdr John A. Scott on the Tunny (SS-282), alerted by an "Ultra" signals- intelligence message from ComSubPac at Pearl Harbor, picks up a contact at 13,000 yards on the Tunny's SJ radar. Scott closes the target on the surface and visually identifies it as an I-class submarine, but the I-42's lookouts also sight the Tunny. For almost an hour and one-half, Scott and Ogawa maneuver for position, each attempting to prevent the other from obtaining a shot.
Six miles SW of Angaur, Palau. At 2324, Scott fires four torpedoes at 1,900 yards. He comes hard starboard to prevent a collision and crash-dives to avoid a possible return attack. Before the Tunny's hatch is closed, two hits are heard and felt and a brilliant flash is seen. Scott dives to 150 feet and begins to circle the area. His soundman reports that the screws of the Japanese submarine have stopped. Breaking up noises are heard that continue for an hour. The I-42 sinks with all 102 hands at 06-40N, 134-03E.
Text courtesy of combinedfleet.com.
Photo courtesy of Tommy Trampp.
Tunny 115kPhoto from the Tunny (SS-282) commissioning book, circa 1945. USN photo courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org.
Tunny 73kPort side view of the Tunny (SS-282) underway, circa 1945. USN photo courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org.
Tunny 39kWWII battleflag of the Tunny (SS-282) 1945. USN photo courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org.
Tiru 308k Bow view of the Tiru (SS-416) under construction at Mare Island on 3 January 1946. Submarines in the background are decommisioned or will soon be: from front to rear are Bashaw (SS-241), Pampanito (SS-383), Mingo (SS-261), Gurnard (SS-254), Macabi (SS-375), Tunny (SS-282), Guavina (SS-362) and Sand Lance (SS-381). USN photo # 18-46, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Mare Island Reserve Fleet137kReserve fleet at Mare Island, circa January 1946. There are 52 submarines and 4 Sub Tenders in this photo. This photo is a Berthing list identifying the ships in the picture. Photo commemorating 50 years, U. S. Submarine Veterans of WW II 1996 calendar, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Mare Island Reserve Fleet453kPhoto of the Reserve fleet at Mare Island, circa January 1946. There are 52 submarines and 4 Sub Tenders in this photo. Whether coincidental or on purpose, the number of boats in the photo is the same as that which were lost in WW II.
From back to front and left to right, first group of 12 boats:
Sandlance (SS-381)
Tunny (SS-282)
Aspro (SS-309)
Lionfish (SS-298)
Guvania (SS-362)
Sunfish (SS-281)
Macabi (SS-375)
Gurnard (SS-254)
Pampanito (SS-383)
Mingo (SS-261)
Guitarro (SS-363)
Bashaw (SS-241)
From back to front and left to right, second group of 12 boats:
Sealion (SS-315)
Hammerhead (SS-364)
Bream (SS-243)
Seahorse (SS-304)
Tinosa (SS-283)
Pintado (SS-387)
Mapiro (SS-376)
Pipefish (SS-388)
Moray (SS-300)
Batfish (SS-310)
Hackleback (SS-295)
Bluegill (SS-242)
From back to front and left to right, third group of 12 boats:
Hawkbill (SS-366)
Menhaden (SS-377)
Perch (SS-313)
Loggerhead (SS-374)
Barbero (SS-317)
Baya (SS-318)
Hardhead (SS-365)
Spadefish (SS-411)
Springer (SS-414)
Devilfish (SS-292)
Kraken (SS-370)
Dragonet (SS-293)
From back to front and left to right, fourth group of 12 boats:
Lamprey (SS-372)
Piranha (SS-389)
Manta (SS-299)
Pargo (SS-264)
Rancador (SS-301)
Archerfish (SS-311)
Mero (SS-378)
Sawfish (SS-276)
Spot (SS-413)
Lizardfish (SS-373)
Jallao (SS-368)
Icefish (SS-367)
From back to front and left to right, last group of 4 boats:
Steelhead (SS-280)
Puffer (SS-268)
Stickleback (SS-415)
Trepang (SS-412)
From back to front, Submarine Tenders group of 4 ships:
Pelias (AS-14)
Aegir (AS-23)
Euryale (AS-22)
Griffin (AS-13)
Photo commemorating 50 years, U. S. Submarine Veterans of WW II 1996 calendar, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Mare Island Reserve Fleet 900k Inactivated submarines at Mare Island on 3 January 1946.
Front row left to right: Sand Lance (SS-381), next two could be Sealion (SS-315) and Seahorse (SS-304), Searaven (SS-196), Pampanito (SS-383), Gurnard (SS-254), Mingo (SS-261), Guitarro (SS-363), Bashaw (SS-241).
Back row left to right: Unknown, Tunny (SS-282), next three could be Sargo (SS-188), Spearfish (SS-190), and Saury (SS-189), Macabi (SS-375), Sunfish (SS-281), Guavina (SS-362), Lionfish (SS-298), Piranha (SS-389).
The Scabbardfish (SS-397) is docked in ARD-11 on the other side of the causeway.

The mixture of boats from the Salmon/Sargo, Gato, and Balao classes illustrate the clear differences in the conning tower fairwaters and the periscope shears that can be used to identify boats. The high bridges with the uncovered support frames (the "covered wagon" look) of the Gato's and Salmon/Sargo's contrast with the low and sleek look of the Balao's. The fatter, more robust periscope shears of the Balao's are markedly different from the thinner shears with more supporting structure of the Gato's and Salmon/Sargo's.
The differences in the pattern of the superstructure limber holes can also be used for identification purposes. The single row of large semi-circular holes identify Electric Boat or Manitowoc boats. A dual row of smaller rectangular holes mark the government built boats. Also note that the EB/Manitowoc boats have the deck mounted, T-shaped JP sonar head on the starboard side of the forward deck, while the government boats have it on the port side.
EB/Manitowoc boats had the anchor on the starboard side, the government boats on the port side. A close look will show that some of the boats have had the anchor removed and the hawsepipe plated over as part of the mothball process.
Most of the boats have the late war radar outfit of the SJ surface search (small dish) and SV air search (large dish). The Balao's and some of the Gato's have the SS dish mounted on a separate large mast aft of the periscopes. The older Salmon/Sargo's and Gato's have a much smaller mast. Searaven appears to have had her radars already removed.
Searaven is actually sporting a late war SJ surface search antennae mounted to starboard of the periscopes. This is a rare installation. Most often it was mounted forward (early war) or aft (late war) of the 'scopes shears. Her air search set is a late war SD antennae mounted on a stub mast directly aft of the 'scopes. Searaven never received the much more capable SV air search set. Having been assigned to training duties after November, 1944 it was probably felt that the SV set was not necessary.
One strange thing: almost all of the boats appear to have the outer doors of the forward torpedo tubes open. Even though the boats have an interlock system that prevents the breech and outer doors from being opened at the same time, this is an unusual thing to do and a potential source of catastrophic flooding.
USN photo # 17-46, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Text courtesy of David Johnston, USNR.
Who Am I?289kInactivated submarines at Mare Island in early 1946.
Front row left to right: Sand Lance (SS-381), next two could be Sealion (SS-315) and Seahorse (SS-304), Searaven (SS-196), Pampanito (SS-383), Gurnard (SS-254), Mingo (SS-261), Guitarro (SS-363), Bashaw (SS-241).
Back row left to right: Unknown, Tunny (SS-282), next three could be Sargo (SS-188), Spearfish (SS-190), and Saury (SS-189), Macabi (SS-375), Sunfish (SS-281), Guavina (SS-362), Lionfish (SS-298), Piranha (SS-389).
The Scabbardfish (SS-397) is docked in ARD-11 on the other side of the causeway.
Tiru (SS-416) is on the ways in upper left hand side of photo. Two ferry boats (to the right of Tiru's ways) are YHB-2 / [ex-Post of Stockton] and YHB-21 / [ex-Tamalpais].
Photo i.d. courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Tunny 115kAdmiral Edwards reads the Presidential Unit Citation for Tunny's (SS-282) service during World War II on 26 April 1946. The Tunny was in decommissioned status and part of the 19th Fleet at Mare Island Navy Yard. USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Menhaden863kFleet Admiral Chester W. Nimitz arrives aboard Menhaden (SS-377) for the commissioning of the ship at Mare Island on 6 March 1953. Left to Right: LCDR James Osborn, CO-Tunny (SSG-282), LCDR Richard Werner, CO Menhaden, Unknown officer and RADM Leon S. Fiske follows Fleet Admiral Nimitz.Photo courtesy of the Vallejo Naval and Historical Museum via Darryl L. Baker.
Menhaden961kMenhaden (SS-377) and Tunny (SSG-282) during re-commissioning ceremony at Mare Island on 6 March 1953.Photo courtesy of the Vallejo Naval and Historical Museum via Darryl L. Baker.
Menhaden836kLCDR James D. Osborn, Commanding Officer of Tunny (SSG-282), reads his orders during the re-commissioning ceremony of Tunny . LT Robert Netting (Executive Officer of Tunny ) is to the left of speaker's stand.Photo courtesy of the Vallejo Naval and Historical Museum via Darryl L. Baker.
Menhaden910kCapt E. W. Greenfall, Tunny (SSG-282) first commanding officer, presents wardroom articles to Tunny's new commanding officer LCDR James D. Osborn at the reception following the commissioning of Tunny at Mare Island on 6 March 1953.Photo courtesy of the Vallejo Naval and Historical Museum via Darryl L. Baker.
Menhaden843kLeft to right: LT Robert Netting (Tunny's (SSG-282) Executive Officer; Mrs. Netting: Mrs. Russell C. Medley; Mrs. James D. Osborn; and LCDR James D. Osborn new Commanding Officer of Tunny . Photo courtesy of the Vallejo Naval and Historical Museum via Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 73k Officers and chiefs at the re-commissioning of Tunny (SSG-282) at Mare Island on 6 March 1953.USN photo # 9483-3-53, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 70kBow on view of the Tunny (SSG-282) underway, after she was recommissioned, 6 March 1953, and converted to Guided Missile Submarine. USN photo courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org.
Tunny 196kStarboard bow view of the Tunny (SSG-282) as she cuts through the water off of Hawaii after she was recommissioned, 6 March 1953, and converted to Guided Missile Submarine. USN photo courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org.
Tunny 157kPort bow view of the Tunny (SSG-282) as she cuts through the water off of Hawaii after she was recommissioned, 6 March 1953, and converted to Guided Missile Submarine. USN photo courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org.
MINSY 71k Photo of Fleet Admiral Chester A. Nimitz at the commissioning ceremonies of Menhaden (SS-377), forward section of sail visible to the right, and Tunny (SSG-282), outboard of Menhaden, at Mare Island on 9 March 1953. From left to right: Elizabeth A. Murphy, Fleet Adm Nimitz, Harry J. Murphy, and RADM L. S. Fiske (Mare Island Area Commander). USN photo # 16473-3-53, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 361kThe Tunny (SSG-282) off Mare Island, 16 April 1953.USN photo # 17095-4-53, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 638kThe Tunny (SSG-282) off Mare Island, 16 April 1953.USN photo 80G-199171 / 17096-4-53, courtesy of Sean Hert.
Tunny 598kThe Tunny (SSG-282) off Mare Island, 16 April 1953.USN photo # 80G-199172, courtesy of Sean Hert.
Tunny 150k Aerial view of Tunny (SSG-282) off Mare Island on 1 May 1953.USN photo # 17292-5-53, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 191kEngineers examine a Regulus missile on Tunny (SSG-282), 3 September 1953. She operated out of Point Mugu, contributing to the development of the Regulus missile system.USN photo courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org.
Tunny67kTunny (SSG-282), underway, entering San Diego harbor, circa 1953.USN photo courtesy of George M. Arnold.
COC 1.34k This unusual view shows eleven vessels of Submarine Squadron Five (nine submarines, a submarine rescue vessel and a submarine tender) moored side by side for a recent change of command ceremony at San Diego, California. Captain Eugene B. Fluckey, USN, Medal of Honor recipient, relieved Captain Francis B. Scanland, USN, as Commander, Submarine Squadron Five on 1 August 1955. Nested alongside the submarine tender Nereus (AS-17) are: Tunny (SSG-282), Cusk (SS-348), Carbonero (SS-337), Tilefish (SS-307), Spinax (SSR-489), Rock (SSR-274), Remora (SS-487), Catfish (SS-339), and Volador (SS-490), and the submarine rescue vessel, Florikan (ASR-9). Photograph released 3 August 1955. Photo # USN 681919 courtesy of the National Museum of the U.S. Navy, via flickr.com.
COC 681k Nereus (AS-17) with nine submarines;
Tunny (SSG-282),
Cusk (SS-348),
Carbonero (SS-337),
Tilefish (SS-307),
Spinax (SSR-489),
Rock (SSR-274),
Remora (SS-487),
Catfish (SS-339),
Volador (SS-490)
and the Submarine Rescue Vessel Florikan (ASR-9) moored alongside at San Diego.
USN photo from "All Hands" magazine, November 1955, courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com
Tunny 475kLCDR Walter Dedrick, Commanding Officer of Tunny (SSG-282), administers the reenlistment oath to SD2 Willie Bailey and ENC Earl W. Houck aboard Tunny berth at Mare Island, 24 October 1955.USN photo # 26850-10-55, courtesy of the Vallejo Naval & Historical Museum via Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 1.11kTunny (SSG-282) preparing to fire & firing a Regulus I missile on 16 November 1956 off the coast of California.USN photo # 699531 & 699533-11-56, courtesy of the Vallejo Naval & Historical Museum via Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 117kStarboard broadside view of the Tunny (SSG-282), showing her Regulus missile launcher container, circa mid 1950's.USN photo courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org.
Tunny 158kPort broadside view of the Tunny (SSG-282), showing her Regulus missile launcher container, circa mid 1950's off Hawaii.USN photo courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org.
Tunny 241kFive photo PDF of Tunny (SSG-282) launching scenes, circa 1953-57.Courtesy of Nick Spark.
Tunny 559kTunny (SSG-282), underway with the Regulus launcher pod on her deck, circa 1953-57.Photo scanned by Ryan Crierie, via flickr, courtesy of Stephen Gower.
Tunny108kTunny (SSG-282) launching a SSM-N-8 Regulus I missile in 1958. Photo taken from U.S. Navy Naval Aviation News, September 1958, courtesy of Robert Hurst.
Tunny 84kPhoto of Tunny (SSG-282) showing a Regulus 1 guided missile being hauled into her deck hangar; another missile is already in position. USN photo from Jane's Fighting Ships, 1958-59. submitted by Robert Hurst.
Tunny1.84kTwo views of the Tunny (SSG-282) on 8 June 1959. USN photo by George M. Arnold & # USN 1042906 scanned by Ryan Crierie, via flickr, courtesy of Stephen Gower.
Bluegill 1.80 Sub base Pearl Harbor, 1962. From L to R: Bream (SS-243),Bluegill (SS-242), Bashaw (SS-241), Medregal (SS-480) & Blackfin (SS-322) with Coucal (ASR-8), alongside.
Tunny (AGS-282) and Barbero (SS-317) are possibly the two nearest foreground boats.
Photo i.d. courtesy of John Hummel & Robert Morgan.
Photo courtesy of Rick Connole, son of Commander David R. Connole,K.I.A. while commanding the Trigger (SS-237), lost with the entire crew of 89 on 28 March 1945.
Regulus Deterrent Patrols1.30kRegulus Deterrent Patrols by the following submarines from September 1959 to July 1964:
Tunny (SSG-282),
Barbero (SSG-317),
Grayback (SS-574),
Growler (SSG-577),&
Halibut (SSGN-587).
Photograph courtesy of Ron Phillipi.
Tunny 1.50kBow view of Tunny (SSG-282) in Pearl Harbor drydock, 4 May 1963.Photo scanned by Ryan Crierie, via flickr, courtesy of Stephen Gower.
Tunny 16kCommemorative postal cover of the Tunny (SSG-282), 20 May 1963.Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Tunny91kTunny (SSG-282) alongside Norris (DD-859) off the coast of Vietnam in 1966. Photo courtesy of Dave Cupples.
Submarine Base Pearl Harbor564kSubmarine are from left to right: Halibut (SSGN-587), Pickerel (SS-524), Perch (LPSS-313), Unidentified & Sterlet (SS-392) at Submarine Base Pearl Harbor on 12 April 1967. USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Tunny 282kThe submarine transport Tunny (APSS-282) underway in 1967, location unknown.USN photo courtesy of Robert Hurst.
Tunny2.00kBow view of Tunny (SSG-282) in Dry Dock at Subic Bay in late December 1967. Photo courtesy of Chuck Thompson.
Tunny2.10kPort stern view of Tunny (SSG-282) in Subic Bay in late December 1967. Photo courtesy of Chuck Thompson.
Tunny1.80kStarboard looking aft view of Tunny (SSG-282) in Subic Bay in late December 1967. Photo courtesy of Chuck Thompson.
Tunny2.30kStarboard looking forward view of Tunny (SSG-282) in Subic Bay in late December 1967. Photo courtesy of Chuck Thompson.
Tunny1.6kFairwater sprouts an Xmas tree aboard Tunny (SSG-282) in Subic Bay in late December 1967. Photo courtesy of Chuck Thompson.
Tunny 1.64kFour page Welcome Aboard PDF for the Tunny (ALSS-282), circa 1968.USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Tunny79k Amphibious transport submarine Tunny (LPSS-282) enters Subic Bay, Republic of the Philippines 10 April 1969.USN photo.
Menhaden1.10kBream (AGSS-243), Tunny (AGS-282) and Charr (AGSS-328), during the decommissioning ceremony at Mare Island on 28 June 1969.Photo courtesy of the Vallejo Naval and Historical Museum via Darryl L. Baker.
Menhaden212kRaton (AGSS-270) and Bluegill (AGSS-242) during the decommissioning ceremony at Mare Island on 28 June 1969. Bream (AGSS-243), Tunny (AGS-282) and Charr (AGSS-328) are forward of Raton and Bluegill. Chara (AE-31) is in the background.Photo courtesy of the Vallejo Naval and Historical Museum via Darryl L. Baker.
Menhaden1.20kCommanding officers of the five decommissioned submarines on the speakers stant at Mare Island on 28 June 1969.Photo courtesy of the Vallejo Naval and Historical Museum via Darryl L. Baker.

View the Tunny (SS/SSG/APSS/LPSS-282)
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