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NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Contributed by Mike Smolinski

Guavina (SS-362) (SSO-362) (AGSS-362) (AOSS-362)

Radio Call Sign: November - Kilo - Hotel - Mike

Gato Class Submarine: Laid down, 3 March 1943, at Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI.; Launched, 29 August 1943; Commissioned USS Guavina (SS-362), 23 December 1943; Placed in commission, in reserve, 6 December 1945; Decommissioned on 8 June 1946; Decommissioned, 6 December 1945; Reactivated in 1949 for conversion at Mare Island Naval Shipyard, Vallejo, CA, to a Submarine Oiler on 13 August 1948; Recommissioned, USS Guavina (SSO-362), 1 February 1950; Redesignated Auxiliary Submarine (AGSS-362), 11 December 1951; Re-designated Submarine Oiler (AOSS-362), 22 June 1957; Decommissioned, 27 March 1959, and assigned to reserve training in Baltimore; Placed out of service and struck from the Naval Register, 30 June 1967; Final Disposition, sunk as a target by Cubera (SS-347), off Cape Henry, VA.Guavina received five battle stars for World War II service.
Partial data submitted by Ron Reeves, HTC, USNR (ret.) & Yves Hubert.

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 1,526 t., Submerged: 2,424 t.; Length 311' 9"; Beam 27' 3"; Draft 15' 3"; Speed, Surfaced 20.25 kts, Submerged 8.75 kts; Cruising Range, 11,000 miles surfaced at 10kts; Submerged Endurance, 48 hours at 2kts; Operating Depth, 300 ft; Complement 6 Officers 54 Enlisted; Armament, ten 21" torpedo tubes, six forward, four aft, 24 torpedoes, one 3"/50 deck gun, two .30 cal. machine guns; Patrol Endurance 75 days; Propulsion, diesel-electric reduction gear with four General Motors main generator diesel engines, 5,400 hp, Fuel Capacity, 116,000 gals., four General Electric main motors with 2,740 hp, two 126-cell main storage batteries, two propellers.
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Guavina48kGuavina (SS-362), on the building ways at Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI., 29 August 1943.
Editors Note: There are over 200 images submitted on these pages covering the following submarines that were constructed at the Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co, Manitowoc, WI,: SS-265 through SS-274, and SS-361 through SS-380.
None of them would have seen the light of day if it were not for the efforts of Curator, Asst. Director, Bill Thiesen of the Wisconsin Maritime Museum, Manitowoc, Wisconsin, and Larry Bohn, who sent them to NavSource for publication.
A special debt of gratitude is owed to these two men and the Wisconsin Maritime Museum, Manitowoc, Wisconsin, home of the Cobia (SS-245) for allowing these photographs to be seen by the lovers of naval history worldwide.
Guavina48kThe Guavina (SS-362) starts to raise her launching timbers on the building ways at Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI., 29 August 1943.
Photo by Harry Berns, Official photographer of the Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI.
Submitted by Larry Bohn. Courtesy of the Wisconsin Maritime Museum, Manitowoc, Wisconsin, home of the Cobia (SS-245)
Guavina33kCommemorative postal cover marking the Guavina's (SS-362) launching on 29 August 1943.Courtesy of petloveshack.com.
Manitowoc55k Watercolor print by the artist Tom Denton of the side launching of a Manitowoc built boat. Courtesy of submarineart.com.
Guavina115kPlankowners of the Guavina (SS-362) pose on the building ways at Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI., 29 August 1943.
Photo by Harry Berns, Official photographer of the Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI.
Submitted by Larry Bohn, courtesy of the Wisconsin Maritime Museum, Manitowoc, Wisconsin, home of the Cobia (SS-245)
Guavina38kGuavina (SS-362) commissioning emblem, 23 December 1943.Photo by Harry Berns, Official photographer of the Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI.
Submitted by Larry Bohn, courtesy of the Wisconsin Maritime Museum, Manitowoc, Wisconsin, home of the Cobia (SS-245)
Guavina174kGuavina (SS-362), underway in the Pacific, circa 1944-45.
Courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org.
Guavina150kMajor overhaul of the Guavina (SS-362) at the Bethlehem Steel Shipyard in San Francisco during the summer of 1945. It is distinguishable by the new 5 inch deck gun mounted aft of the conning tower shears.
Courtesy of Robert E. Straub, RM2,SS, USS Guavina SS-362 (August 1944 to August 1946).
Lockwood 155k Lt. Commander Ralph Huntington Lockwood served as executive officer and later commanding officer of the submarine Guavina (SS-362) from August, 1943 to December, 1945. For duty on board Guavina, he was awarded two Silver Stars and a Second Bronze Star.
Included here is a PDF of Guavina's decommissioning Public Information Package prepared by her XO, LCDR J. T. Garrow. The package includes the following; war patrol summary, Awards, Citations, Honors received by crew members during her WWII service and 29 August 1945 crew listing.
Image from the San Diego Navy Historical Association courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
PDF courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Mare Island Causeway 461k 6 Dec 45 photo appeared in the 14 Dec 45 issue of the Mare Island newspaper lists the following subs present at the dockyard:
Unknown, Dragonet (SS-293), Guavina (SS-362), Sunfish (SS-281), Sargo (SS-188), Spearfish (SS-190), Saury (SS-189).
First two ships in second row appear to be: Bashaw (SS-241) and Mingo (SS-261).
The Tiru (SS-416) is on the building ways on the left above the subs and surrounding by staging and cranes.
It is interesting to note that the boats have started the mothballing process, as evidenced by the preservative cocoons around the deck guns.
U.S. Navy photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.Partial text courtesy of David Johnston, USNR.
Guavina43k Guavina's (SS-362) battle insignia.
Photo by Harry Berns, Official photographer of the Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI.
Submitted by Larry Bohn, courtesy of the Wisconsin Maritime Museum, Manitowoc, Wisconsin, home of the Cobia (SS-245)
Guavina97kGuavina (SS-362) WW II battleflag.
Courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org.
Tiru 308k Bow view of the Tiru (SS-416) under construction at Mare Island on 3 January 1946. Submarines in the background are decommissioned or will soon be: from front to rear are Bashaw (SS-241), Pampanito (SS-383), Mingo (SS-261), Gurnard (SS-254), Macabi (SS-375), Tunny (SS-282), Guavina (SS-362) and Sand Lance (SS-381). USN photo # 18-46, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Mare Island Reserve Fleet137kReserve fleet at Mare Island, circa January 1946. There are 52 submarines and 4 Sub Tenders in this photo. This photo is a Berthing list identifying the ships in the picture. Photo commemorating 50 years, U. S. Submarine Veterans of WW II 1996 calendar, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Mare Island Reserve Fleet453kPhoto of the Reserve fleet at Mare Island, circa January 1946. There are 52 submarines and 4 Sub Tenders in this photo. Whether coincidental or on purpose, the number of boats in the photo is the same as that which were lost in WW II.
From back to front and left to right, first group of 12 boats:
Sandlance (SS-381)
Tunny (SS-282)
Aspro (SS-309)
Lionfish (SS-298)
Guvania (SS-362)
Sunfish (SS-281)
Macabi (SS-375)
Gurnard (SS-254)
Pampanito (SS-383)
Mingo (SS-261)
Guitarro (SS-363)
Bashaw (SS-241)
From back to front and left to right, second group of 12 boats:
Sealion (SS-315)
Hammerhead (SS-364)
Bream (SS-243)
Seahorse (SS-304)
Tinosa (SS-283)
Pintado (SS-387)
Mapiro (SS-376)
Pipefish (SS-388)
Moray (SS-300)
Batfish (SS-310)
Hackleback (SS-295)
Bluegill (SS-242)
From back to front and left to right, third group of 12 boats:
Hawkbill (SS-366)
Menhaden (SS-377)
Perch (SS-313)
Loggerhead (SS-374)
Barbero (SS-317)
Baya (SS-318)
Hardhead (SS-365)
Spadefish (SS-411)
Springer (SS-414)
Devilfish (SS-292)
Kraken (SS-370)
Dragonet (SS-293)
From back to front and left to right, fourth group of 12 boats:
Lamprey (SS-372)
Piranha (SS-389)
Manta (SS-299)
Pargo (SS-264)
Rancador (SS-301)
Archerfish (SS-311)
Mero (SS-378)
Sawfish (SS-276)
Spot (SS-413)
Lizardfish (SS-373)
Jallao (SS-368)
Icefish (SS-367)
From back to front and left to right, last group of 4 boats:
Steelhead (SS-280)
Puffer (SS-268)
Stickleback (SS-415)
Trepang (SS-412)
From back to front, Submarine Tenders group of 4 ships:
Pelias (AS-14)
Aegir (AS-23)
Euryale (AS-22)
Griffin (AS-13)
Photo commemorating 50 years, U. S. Submarine Veterans of WW II 1996 calendar, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Mare Island Reserve Fleet 900k Inactivated submarines at Mare Island on 3 January 1946.
Front row left to right: Sand Lance (SS-381), next two could be Sealion (SS-315) and Seahorse (SS-304), Searaven (SS-196), Pampanito (SS-383), Gurnard (SS-254), Mingo (SS-261), Guitarro (SS-363), Bashaw (SS-241).
Back row left to right: Unknown, Tunny (SS-282), next three could be Sargo (SS-188), Spearfish (SS-190), and Saury (SS-189), Macabi (SS-375), Sunfish (SS-281), Guavina (SS-362), Lionfish (SS-298),Piranha (SS-389).
The Scabbardfish (SS-397) is docked in ARD-11 on the other side of the causeway.

The mixture of boats from the Salmon/Sargo, Gato, and Balao classes illustrate the clear differences in the conning tower fairwaters and the periscope shears that can be used to identify boats. The high bridges with the uncovered support frames (the "covered wagon" look) of the Gatos and Salmon/Sargo's contrast with the low and sleek look of the Balao's. The fatter, more robust periscope shears of the Balao's are markedly different from the thinner shears with more supporting structure of the Gatos and Salmon/Sargo's.
The differences in the pattern of the superstructure limber holes can also be used for identification purposes. The single row of large semi-circular holes identify Electric Boat or Manitowoc boats. A dual row of smaller rectangular holes mark the government built boats. Also note that the EB/Manitowoc boats have the deck mounted, T-shaped JP sonar head on the starboard side of the forward deck, while the government boats have it on the port side.
EB/Manitowoc boats had the anchor on the starboard side, the government boats on the port side. A close look will show that some of the boats have had the anchor removed and the hawsepipe plated over as part of the mothball process.
Most of the boats have the late war radar outfit of the SJ surface search (small dish) and SV air search (large dish). The Balao's and some of the Gatos have the SS dish mounted on a separate large mast aft of the periscopes. The older Salmon/Sargo's and Gatos have a much smaller mast. Searaven appears to have had her radars already removed.
Searaven is actually sporting a late war SJ surface search antennae mounted to starboard of the periscopes. This is a rare installation. Most often it was mounted forward (early war) or aft (late war) of the 'scopes shears. Her air search set is a late war SD antennae mounted on a stub mast directly aft of the 'scopes. Searaven never received the much more capable SV air search set. Having been assigned to training duties after November, 1944 it was probably felt that the SV set was not necessary.
One strange thing: almost all of the boats appear to have the outer doors of the forward torpedo tubes open. Even though the boats have an interlock system that prevents the breech and outer doors from being opened at the same time, this is an unusual thing to do and a potential source of catastrophic flooding.
U.S. Navy photo # 17-46, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Text courtesy of David Johnston, USNR.
Who Am I?289kInactivated submarines at Mare Island in early 1946.
Front row left to right: Sand Lance (SS-381), next two could be Sealion (SS-315) and Seahorse (SS-304), Searaven (SS-196), Pampanito (SS-383), Gurnard (SS-254), Mingo (SS-261), Guitarro (SS-363), Bashaw (SS-241).
Back row left to right: Unknown, Tunny (SS-282), next three could be Sargo (SS-188), Spearfish (SS-190), and Saury (SS-189), Macabi (SS-375), Sunfish (SS-281), Guavina (SS-362), Lionfish (SS-298),Piranha (SS-389).
The Scabbardfish (SS-397) is docked in ARD-11 on the other side of the causeway.
Tiru (SS-416) is on the ways in upper left hand side of photo. Two ferry boats (to the right of Tiru's ways) are YHB-2 / [ex-Post of Stockton] and YHB-21 / [ex-Tamalpais].
Photo i.d. courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
US Navy photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Guavina333kGuavina (SS-362) oiler conversion plan.USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Guavina530kBow view of Guavina (SS-362) in Mare Island's dry dock #1 during her conversion to submarine tanker on 20 June 1949. U.S. Navy photo # 3810-6-49, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Guavina551kStern view of Guavina (SS-362) in Mare Island's dry dock #1 during her conversion to submarine tanker on 20 June 1949. U.S. Navy photo # 3811-6-49, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Guavina474kStern view of Guavina (SS-362) in Mare Island's dry dock #1 during her conversion to submarine tanker 18 November 1949. U.S. Navy photo # 4884-11-49, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Guavina474kBow view of Guavina (SS-362) in Mare Island's dry dock #1 during her conversion to submarine tanker 18 November 1949. U.S. Navy photo # 4885-11-49, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Guavina437kStern view of Guavina (SS-362) at her outfitting berth during her conversion at Mare Island on 20 January 1950.U.S. Navy photo # 5274-1-50, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Guavina328kBow view of Guavina (SS-362) at her outfitting berth during her conversion at Mare Island on 20 January 1950.U.S. Navy photo # 5275-1-50, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Guavina124k Commissioning ceremonies aboard Guavina (AOSS-362) at Mare Island on 1 February 1950. Officer from left to right: Unidentified LCDR, Capt. R. E. Bacon, Commander, SubAD; RADM F. J. Lowry, Area Commander, Mare Island; RADM H. E. Haven, Commander, Mare Island Naval Shipyard; LCDR W. E. Norrington, Jr., Commanding Officer, Guavina; and Capt. C. R. Woodson, Shipyard Administrative Officer.
U.S. Navy photo # 5337-2-50, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Guavina808kMrs. and LCDR W. E. Norrington (Commanding Officer) after her re-commissioning at Mare Island on 1 February 1950.U.S. Navy photo # 5337D-2-50 TH, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Guavina161kColors raised aboard Guavina (AOSS-362) during her commissioning at Mare Island on 1 February 1950.U.S. Navy photo # 5337F-2-50 TH, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Guavina 118kGuavina (SS-362) underway on 10 February 1950. Mare Island Navy Yard Ship Files, NARA San Francisco, Photo # NY9-5399-2-50, courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Photo added 02/09/13.
Guavina82k Bow on view of Guavina (SS-362) departing Mare Island on 10 February 1950.
U.S. Navy photo # 5396-2-50, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Guavina69k Broadside view of Guavina (SS-362) departing Mare Island on 10 February 1950. She was under conversion at the yard from 15 April 1949 to 10 February 1950.
U.S. Navy photo # 5398-2-50, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Guavina141kAmidships looking aft plan view of Guavina (SS-362) at Mare Island on 10 March 1950.
U.S. Navy photo # 5660-3-50, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Guavina124k Amidships looking forward plan view of Guavina (SS-362) at Mare Island on 10 March 1950.
U.S. Navy photo # 5661-3-50, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Guavina510kGuavina (AOSS-362) in San Francisco Bay on 21 March 1950.U.S. Navy photo # 5730-3-50 TH, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Guavina920kGuavina (AOSS-362) heading for the Golden Gate on 21 March 1950.U.S. Navy photo # 5731-3-50 TH, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Guavina920kIn San Pablo Bay heading for Mare Island on 17 February 1952.U.S. Navy photo # 12018-2-52 TH, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Guavina250k In 1951 the submarine force achieved another important milestone. Guavina (SS-362) used an experimental searchlight sonar to distinguish the sound signature of Seacat (SS-399) and the fleet tug Salinian (ATF-161) at ranges of 9-10 nm.
Text & US Navy photo courtesy of chinfo.navy.mil.
Guavina425kThe coming and going of the Guavina (AGSS-362), Philadelphia Navy Yard, 21 July 1954.
Courtesy of John Hummel.
Guavina188kGuavina (AGSS-362) at Philadelphia Navy Yard, 21 July 1954.
Courtesy of John Hummel.
Guavina119kStern view of Guavina (AGSS-362) at Philadelphia Navy Yard, 21 July 1954.
US Navy photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Guavina1.00kGuavina (AGSS-362), refueling a P5M Marlin flying boat off Norfolk, VA. on 3 March 1955.
Prior to World War II, several submarines were fitted to refuel seaplanes. During the war, Germany and Japan used this technique with some success. After the war this technique was experimented with within the US Navy. It was planned to use submarines to refuel the new jet powered P6M flying boats. As part of this program Guavina was converted to carry 160,000 gallons for aviation fuel. To do this, blisters were added to her sides and two stern torpedo tubes were removed. When the P6M project was canceled, there was no further need for submarine tankers. This concept was never used operationally in the US Navy.
Photo # 80-G-709414 scanned by Ryan Crierie, via flickr, courtesy of Stephen Gower.
Guavina1.20kGuavina (SS-362) and Seaplane from the Tidal Wave on 3 March 1955. Photo # 80-G-709412 scanned by Ryan Crierie, via flickr, courtesy of Stephen Gower.
Guavina72kGuavina (AGSS-362), alongside Chewaucan (AOG-50), taking on AVGAS, off Cagliari, Sardinia, 9 October 1956.Photo by Larry Bohn.
Guavina49kGuavina (AGSS-362), coming alongside Chewaucan (AOG-50), to take on AVGAS, in Suda Bay, Crete, December 1956. The unusual light pattern on Guavina's hull is caused by the sun shining through the tank deck and catwalk of Chewaucan. Note the fueling platform at the stern of Guavina.Photo by Larry Bohn.
Guavina51kGuavina (AGSS-362), alongside Chewaucan (AOG-50), taking on AVGAS, Suda Bay Crete, December 1956.Photo by Larry Bohn.
Guavina44k Guavina (AOSS-362) in Baltimore, 1966.
Courtesy of Donald Wood, via submarinesailor.com.
Guavina75kThe Guavina's (AGSS-362) final moments above the ocean floor as seen through the periscope of the Cubera (SS-347), following a Mark 16 torpedo test off the coast of Cape Henry, Virginia, 11 November 1967. Photo courtesy of Ron Norford.

View the Guavina (SS-362)
DANFS history entry located on the Haze Gray & Underway Web Site.
Crew Contact And Reunion Information
U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation
Fleet Reserve Association

Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
submarinesailor.com
Ep-21 (1) - Victory At Sea ~ Full Fathom Five - HQ
Manitowoc Built Submarines

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