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NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Patches on left & center contributed by Mike Smolinski, on right by Francisco Javier Santos Vazquez

Jallao (SS-368)

Radio Call Sign: November - Kilo - India - Victor

Balao Class Submarine: Laid down, 29 September 1943, at Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI.; Launched, 12 March 1944; Commissioned USS Jallao (SS-368), 8 July 1944; Decommissioned, 30 September 1946 at Mare Island Navy Yard, Vallejo, CA.; Laid up in the Pacific Reserve Fleet at Mare Island; Placed in commission in reserve in early 1953 for transit to New London, CT., for Guppy IIA conversion; Decommissioned upon arrival at New London; Recommissioned, 4 December 1953; Decommissioned, struck from the Naval Register, and transferred (sold) under the terms of the Security Assistance Program, to Spain, 26 June 1974; Commissioned into the Spanish Navy as Narciso Monturiol; Final Disposition, fate unknown, but according to their website the Wardroom is in the Navy Museum in Cartagena., and the boat was scuttled on the Atlantic Side 31 December 1984. The boat's figurehead resides in the Nautilus Museum in Groton, CT...The boat was nicknamed "SAM". Jallao received four battle stars for World War II service.
Partial data submitted by Ron Reeves, HTC, USNR (ret.)& Yves Hubert.

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 1,526 t., Submerged: 2,424 t.; Length 311' 9"; Beam 27' 3"; Draft 15' 3"; Speed, Surfaced 20.25 kts, Submerged 8.75 kts; Cruising Range, 11,000 miles surfaced at 10kts; Submerged Endurance, 48 hours at 2kts; Operating Depth, 400 ft; Complement 6 Officers, 60 Enlisted; Armament, ten 21" torpedo tubes, six forward, four aft, 24 torpedoes; one 5"/25 deck gun, one 40mm gun, one 20mm gun; Patrol Endurance 75 days; Propulsion, diesel-electric reduction gear with four General Motors main generator engines, 5,400hp, Fuel Capacity 118,000 gals., four General Electric main motors with 2,740hp, two 126-cell main storage batteries, two propellers.
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Jallao60kCommemorative postal cover on the occasion of the keel laying of the Jallao (SS-368), 30 September 1943, at Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI. Courtesy of Paul Petosky.
Jallao216kThe Jallao (SS-368) is about to make her impact in history & the Manitowoc River, in Manitowoc, WI, 12 March 1944.Photo by Harry Berns, Official photographer of the Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI.
USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Manitowoc55k Watercolor print by the artist Tom Denton of the side launching of a Manitowoc built boat. Courtesy of submarineart.com
Jallao11kCommemorative postal cover on the occasion of the launching of the Jallao (SS-368), 12 March 1944. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Jallao45k Battle insignia of the Jallao (SS-368).
Editors Note: There are over 200 images submitted on these pages covering the following submarines that were constructed at the Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co, Manitowoc, WI,: SS-265 through SS-274, and SS-361 through SS-380.
None of them would have seen the light of day if it were not for the efforts of Curator, Asst. Director, Bill Thiesen and Larry Bohn who sent them to NavSource for publication.
A special debt of gratitude is owed to these two men and the Wisconsin Maritime Museum, home of the Cobia (SS-245) for allowing these photographs to be seen by the lovers of naval history worldwide.
Jallao31kPlankowners of the Jallao (SS-368) pose on deck, July 1944.Photo by Harry Berns, Official photographer of the Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI.
Submitted by Larry Bohn, courtesy of the Wisconsin Maritime Museum home of the Cobia (SS-245)
Jallao35kJallao (SS-368), undergoing sea trials on Lake Michigan, July 1944. Photo by Harry Berns, Official photographer of the Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI.
Submitted by Larry Bohn, courtesy of the Wisconsin Maritime Museum home of the Cobia (SS-245)
Harry Berns485kPhoto of Harry Berns, Official photographer of the Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI.
The photo of the Golet (SS-361) encased in snow appears on the wall above him on the upper right.
His obituary appears here.
Photo courtesy of Susan Menk, Archives Assistant, Wisconsin Maritime Museum, Dee Anna Grimsrud,Reference Archivist, Wisconsin Historical Society, Steve Khail, CBC, Director of Investor Relations & Corporate Communications, The Manitowoc Company, Inc. & William Young.
Unknown Photos440k Text accompanying this photo reads "Enlisted men repair and check instruments aboard a submarine just returned to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. May 1945."
Note: Many of the captions of Bristol's photography are lacking in details and some have the wrong dates, places and locations.
The "23" boat in question in this photo is definitely NOT the S-23 (SS-128). It is beyond a doubt a Salmon or Gato/Balao class fleet boat, and I would lean toward a Balao. The date of the photo is probably early to mid 1944.
The boat in question has the characteristically fat, twin periscope shears and long, wide flat "cigarette" deck of a Balao. Directly above the head of the sailor who is working at the base of the aft scope is a radar mast. The sailor behind him is standing at and looking through the aft Target Bearing Transmitter (TBT). Barely visible on the far left of the photo is what I believe to be part of a 20 mm gun mount.
None of these features were ever present on any of the S-boats, even the later 40 series that were heavily modified (i.e. S-45 (SS-156) ) towards the end of the war. The whole conning tower fairwater on the boat in question is simply too large for a S-boat.
As for the "23" on the fairwater, I have seen wartime photos of fleet boats displaying mysterious one and two digit numbers that do not correspond to their hull number (see the Guardfish (SS-217) and Peto (SS-265) pages for examples). Despite a lot of research, I have not turned up an official explanation for these strange numbers. One source said that they were squadron or flotilla identifiers, but I can't back this up officially. It is possible that they were temporary numbers assigned while the boats were in home waters, maybe to cut down on friendly fire incidents. Strangely enough, these numbers also seemed to have been used briefly during WWI, as I have seen them on D, E, F, G, and H-class boats.
It is also entirely possible that these numbers are part of an official disinformation program designed to obscure the identities of the boats while allowing a wide distribution of photos to an information hungry wartime public. That would also account for the information inaccuracies attributed to otherwise highly thought of photographers.
Riveted construction on the conning tower fairwaters of the fleet boats was far more common than I previously thought. It seems that the fairwater plating was riveted to the supporting structure underneath during construction on virtually all of the fleet boats, no matter who built it. This was possible due to the fact that the fairwater was non-watertight and merely provided for a smooth flow of water around the conning tower and lower periscope shears.
Riveting was a long practiced and well known construction method, while welding was still relatively new and there was a fairly low number of skilled and experienced welders, and they had to be parceled out carefully depending on priority. All of the pressure resisting elements such as the conning tower and the main pressure hull were welded. The last fleet boat to have a riveted pressure hull was the Pompano (SS-181) in 1937. These original riveted fairwaters were retained until the end of the war, unless the boat had major rework of the fairwater performed (like most of the Gato's), or if the boat suffered battle damage. The rework jobs seemed to have been mostly welded.
I would lay money on it being a Manitowoc built Balao class and I will stick with the early to mid 1944 date.
National Archives Record Administration (NARA) photo # 80-G-468179 & HD-SN-99-02504 by Lt. Comdr. Horace Bristol, from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection, courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil.
Partial text courtesy of Jason McDonald, President & Executive Producer MFA Productions LLC.
worldwar2database.com
Majority of text and photo i.d. courtesy of Dave Johnston (USNR).
Jallao 130k The light cruiser HIJMS Tama at anchor, February 1942. Tama is wearing a camouflage scheme that helped foreshorten the hull, with irregular stripes on funnels and superstructure. Colour scheme is made up of Black, mid-grey and white colours. Damaged 25 October 1944 by aircraft from Essex (CV-9) and Lexington (CV-16); torpedoed the same day 320 miles NE of Cape Engano (21 degrees 32' N, 129 degrees 17' E) by the submarine Jallao (SS-368). Photo courtesy of Kazushige Todaka via Robert Hurst.
Lizardfish and friends 40k Inboard of the Sperry (AS-12) lie the
Tilefish (SS-307) ,
Brill (SS-350),
Trepang (SS-412),
Jallao (SS-368),
Spot (SS-413) , and
Lizardfish (SS-373), late 1945 - early 46.
The history of the Jallao can be viewed here.
Photo courtesy of John Hummel, (USN) retired.
PDF courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Mare Island Reserve Fleet137kReserve fleet at Mare Island, circa January 1946. There are 52 submarines and 4 Sub Tenders in this photo. This photo is a Berthing list identifying the ships in the picture. Photo commemorating 50 years, U. S. Submarine Veterans of WW II 1996 calendar, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Mare Island Reserve Fleet453kPhoto of the Reserve fleet at Mare Island, circa January 1946. There are 52 submarines and 4 Sub Tenders in this photo. Whether coincidental or on purpose, the number of boats in the photo is the same as that which were lost in WW II.
From back to front and left to right, first group of 12 boats:
Sandlance (SS-381)
Tunny (SS-282)
Aspro (SS-309)
Lionfish (SS-298)
Guvania (SS-362)
Sunfish (SS-281)
Macabi (SS-375)
Gurnard (SS-254)
Pampanito (SS-383)
Mingo (SS-261)
Guitarro (SS-363)
Bashaw (SS-241)
From back to front and left to right, second group of 12 boats:
Sealion (SS-315)
Hammerhead (SS-364)
Bream (SS-243)
Seahorse (SS-304)
Tinosa (SS-283)
Pintado (SS-387)
Mapiro (SS-376)
Pipefish (SS-388)
Moray (SS-300)
Batfish (SS-310)
Hackleback (SS-295)
Bluegill (SS-242)
From back to front and left to right, third group of 12 boats:
Hawkbill (SS-366)
Menhaden (SS-377)
Perch (SS-313)
Loggerhead (SS-374)
Barbero (SS-317)
Baya (SS-318)
Hardhead (SS-365)
Spadefish (SS-411)
Springer (SS-414)
Devilfish (SS-292)
Kraken (SS-370)
Dragonet (SS-293)
From back to front and left to right, fourth group of 12 boats:
Lamprey (SS-372)
Piranha (SS-389)
Manta (SS-299)
Pargo (SS-264)
Rancador (SS-301)
Archerfish (SS-311)
Mero (SS-378)
Sawfish (SS-276)
Spot (SS-413)
Lizardfish (SS-373)
Jallao (SS-368)
Icefish (SS-367)
From back to front and left to right, last group of 4 boats:
Steelhead (SS-280)
Puffer (SS-268)
Stickleback (SS-415)
Trepang (SS-412)
From back to front, Submarine Tenders group of 4 ships:
Pelias (AS-14)
Aegir (AS-23)
Euryale (AS-22)
Griffin (AS-13)
Photo commemorating 50 years, U. S. Submarine Veterans of WW II 1996 calendar, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Piranha 368k Post war predator photo of Piranha (SS-389), Moray (SS-300), Mapiro (SS-376), Baya (SS-318) & Jallao (SS-368). USN photo courtesy of subasepearl.com. via Ron Reeves.
Photo added 02/25/16.
Mare Island Reserve Fleet227k The Icefish (SS-367) in the Mare Island Reserve Fleet on 13 October 1948. The other subs outboard of Icefish are Jallao (SS-368), Trepang (SS-412), Spot (SS-413) and Stickleback (SS-415). USN photo # 1916-10-48, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Jallao128k LCDR J. W. Mercer assumes command of the re-commissioned Jallao (SS-368), at Mare Island on 4 December 1953.USN photo # 9521-12-53, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Jallao136k Broadside view of Jallao (SS-368) off Mare Island on 23 January 1954. She was in overhaul at Mare Island from 16 March 1953 to 3 February 1954. USN photo # 9983-1-54, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Jallao145k Stern view of Jallao (SS-368) off Mare Island on 23 January 1954. USN photo # 99853-1-54, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Jallao44kJallao (SS-368), bow view undergoing Guppy II conversion in Phila. Navy Yard, post 1953.Photo courtesy of John Hummel, (USN) retired.
Jallao60kJallao (SS-368), stern view undergoing Guppy II conversion at Phila. Navy Yard, post 1953.Photo courtesy of John Hummel, (USN) retired.
Jallao75kJallao (SS-368), after Guppy IIA conversion underway on 26 April 1954.USN photo # USN 637466, courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org.
Jallao 1.43k Jallao (SS-368) while moored at Djibouti, French Somaliland. French coast natives watch the entire proceedings with a dubious eye, 15 February 1956. Jallao began a three-month 18,000 mile goodwill cruise home from the Mediterranean, on 20 January after completing a tour of duty with the United States Sixth Fleet. She departed from the island of Malta en-route to the Suez Canal, the Red Sea, African ports on the Indian Ocean and the Cape of Good Hope. After rounding the cape, she will cross the Atlantic and visit South American countries en-route to North to her home port of New London, Connecticut. This is the first such cruise to be made by a U.S. Navy submarine is in line with Navy policy of having U.S. ships visit foreign ports where the crews may enjoy liberty and recreation. The initial itinerary of the Jallao was: Port Said, Egypt; Massau, Ethiopia; Djibouti; French Somaliland; and Capetown, Union of South Africa. USN photo # USN 686490, courtesy of the National Museum of the U.S. Navy, via flickr.com.
Jallao325k Jallao (SS-368) joins the Marine(s) rail way at New London CT., 1958.Photo by FTCM(SS) John Lundquist via John Hummel.
Jallao309kBow view of the Jallao (SS-368) at New London CT., 1958.Photo by FTCM(SS) John Lundquist via John Hummel.
Jallao157kJallao (SS-368) on 3 August 1963.
During this period the ship took part in training cruises to the Caribbean, served in submarine school training, and participated in equipment evaluation work.
Text courtesy of DANFS.
USN photo # NPC 1088337 courtesy of ussubvetsofwwii.org.
Jallao238k Jallao (SS-368) in the North Atlantic during the summer of 1963 while participating in an ASW exercise with the Essex (CV-9). Photo courtesy of Michael O'Brien.
Jallao183k Jallao (SS-368) in the North Atlantic during the summer of 1963 pulling away from the camera. Photo courtesy of Michael O'Brien.
Jallao 326k The Jallao (SS-368) as seen from the Springfield (CLG-7) at Naples, Italy in 1965. Photo courtesy of William C. Swisher CTR3 USN '62/'66 via Tom Bateman. Photo i.d. courtesy of David Johnston, USNR.
Jallao75kAcrylic on canvas by the artist William RaVell III depicting the Jallao (SS-368) outbound on the Thames River, Groton, CT having departed the Groton Submarine Base (not visible) and is passing the U. S. Coast Guard Academy, New London, CT, on her starboard side.
The painting is based on the below photo.
Photo & text courtesy of subart.net.
Jallao52kWith a 3 masted sailing vessel tied up to the wharf in the background, the Jallao (SS-368) returns circa 1 May 1965 for submarine warfare tactics and submarine school operations out of New London.Photo by Harry Berns, Official photographer of the Manitowoc Shipbuilding Co., Manitowoc, WI.
Submitted by Larry Bohn, courtesy of the Wisconsin Maritime Museum home of the Cobia (SS-245)
Fremantle 365k This plaque was unveiled 20 March 1995 by His Excellency Major General P.M. Jeffery OA MC, Govenor of Western Australia to commemeorate the sacrifices made by Allied submarined that operated out of Fremantle, Western Australia during WW II. Photo courtesy of Ron Reeves.
Narciso Monturiol (S-35)
Jallao98kNarciso Monturiol Estarriol. Born in Figueres, Girona, 28 September 1819. Died in Sant Mart de Provenals, Barcelona, 6 September 1885. Spanish inventor, primarily dedicated to submarine navigation. Photo & text courtesy of Francisco Javier Santos Va'zquez via Fabio Pena.
No Hay Quinto Malo54k S-35 had no name until 2 July 1979, when she "inherited" the name from ex-Picuda (SS-382) [S-35]. Up until then, she had been known just by her hull number and by her nickname, No Hay Quinto Malo (No Fifth Is Wrong), a Spanish saying adopted from bullfighting and applied to this boat because she was the 5th ex-American submarine in the Spanish Navy. Photo & text courtesy of Francisco Javier Santos Va'zquez via Fabio Pena.
Jallao 59k Narciso Monturiol (S-35) plaque. It is 7 inches in diameter and weighs 1.3 kilograms of pure bronze. Photo courtesy of CMDR Peter Curto via Sergio Cocciarin & Yves Hubert.
Jallao53kThe ex-Jallao, now in service in the Spanish Navy as Narciso Monturiol (S-35), with the Daphne type submarine Narval (S-64) (outboard) circa 1980. Photo from Conway's All The World's Fighting Ships, 1947-1995
Submitted courtesy of Robert Hurst.
Jallao55kThe Spanish flag flies from the stern of the Narciso Monturiol (S-35), circa 1980. Photo courtesy of perso.wanadoo.es.
Jallao37kThe Narciso Monturiol (S-35) is greeted with a spray of water from fire-boats, circa 1980. Photo courtesy of perso.wanadoo.es.

View the Jallao (SS-368)
DANFS history entry located on the Haze Gray & Underway Web Site.
Crew Contact And Reunion Information
U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation
Fleet Reserve Association

Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
Ep-21 (1) - Victory At Sea ~ Full Fathom Five - HQ
ussjallao.com
HISTORIA DEL Narciso Monturiol "S-35
Manitowoc Built Submarines

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