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NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive

Fulton


Adder Class Submarine Torpedo Boat: Laid down as Fulton. Built at Nixon's Crescent Shipyard in Elizabethport, New Jersey during the summer of 1901. She was a prototype of the A-Class subs. She was put into service but never commissioned by the Navy. Electric Boat planned to enter Fulton, a company-financed prototype of an 'improved' Holland.
Final Disposition: Delivered to Vladivostok 1904 - to Black Sea Fleet then to Baltic Fleet 1915 - Sunk in collision 10 May 1916.

Specifications: Displacement; Surfaced, 107 t., Submerged, 123 t.; Length 63' 10"; Beam 11' 11"; Draft 10' 7"; Speed, Surfaced, 8 kts, Submerged, 7 kts; Depth Limit 150'; Complement, 1 Officer, 6 Enlisted; Armament, one 18" torpedo tube, 5 torpedoes; Propulsion, Otto Gas Engine Works gasoline engine, HP 160; Fuel Capacity 767 gal.; Electro Dynamic electric motors, HP 150; Battery Cells 60; single screw.
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Fulton 355k Launching of the Fulton at Nixon's Crescent Shipyard in Elizabethport, New Jersey on 13 June 1901. Image and text provided by University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.
Photo by Daily Public Ledger. (Maysville, Ky.) 1892-191?, 13 June 1901, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Photo courtesy of militaryhonors via Ron Reeves.
Photo added 08/15/15.
Fulton 3.00k ALL NIGHT UNDER THE SEA.
CREW OF THE FULTON AFTER TEST SAY THEY COULD LIVE COMFORTABLY AS LONG AS FOOD WOULD LAST.
SUBMARINE BOAT SURPASSES FONDEST DREAMS.
Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 25 November 1901, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Fulton 2.26k DREAMS OF FICTION ALL ECLIPSED BY AN ACTUAL SUBMARINE WONDER
Stays Under Water Fifteen Hours and Her Crew Does Not Even Know a Great Storm Is Raging
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Evening World. (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, 25 November 1901, Night Edition, Image 12, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Fulton 1.12k MEN WHO SPENT A NIGHT UNDER WATER IN THE SUBMARINE BOAT FULTON. Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 29 November 1901, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Fulton 3.02k TORPEDO BOAT FULTON, REMAINS UNDER WATER FOR A PERIOD OF FIFTEEN HOURS.
HOLLAND SUBMARINE BOAT AS IT APPEARS UNDER WATER.
Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN.
Photo from Dakota Farmers' Leader. (Canton, S.D.) 1890-19??, 20 December 1901, Image 7, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Fulton 769k Trial of the Fulton at Greenport. Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 11 September 1904, Image 25, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Fulton 1.37k SUBMARINE FLEET OF NINE BOATS SOON TO BE READY FOR UNCLE SAM
The submarine boat Fulton breaking through ice in Peconic Bay.
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Evening World.(New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, 01 February 1902, Night Edition, Image 3, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Fulton 2.82k Submarine Boat Fulton to cross the Atlantic under her own power.
"I would sooner go in her than in a liner," said Capt. Frank T. Cable.
Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN.
Photo from The Appeal.(Saint Paul, Minn.;) 1889-19??, 15 February 1902, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Porpoise and Fulton327kCirca 1903-04 photo of the Porpoise (SS-07) inboard and the never commissioned Fulton outboard, along with a number of other submarines in the background.
The Fulton was shipped to Russia in June of 1904 aboard the English freighter Menantic bound for St. Petersburg and then ended up via rail in Vladivostok.
Text i.d. courtesy of Ric Hedman.
USN photo, courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Fulton 1.03k Fulton keeps the seas.
Submarine boat stands a severe test in high waves.
Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 11 June 1904, Image 4, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Fulton 1.50k The Development of the Submarine In Naval Warfare; Tiny Craft Which May Put Battleships Out of Commission.
The Fulton & Protector are shown.
Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo from Deseret Evening News. (Great Salt Lake City [Utah]) 1867-1920, 13 July 1904, Last Edition, Image 7, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Adder Class Diag.514k Tank layout of the Adder class submarine by Bureau of Construction and Repair, Navy Department August 1904.USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Fulton115kFulton about to be loaded on a barge to begin its journey to Russia. Text & photo courtesy of pbs.org/wgbh/nova.
Fulton 655k The Fulton, U. S. Navy's First Submarine
CONTRASTED WITH MODERN SUBMERSIBLES ALL DEVELOPED ALONG LINES THE FULTON PROVED PRACTICABLE SIXTEEN YEARS AGO
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Evening World. (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, 20 June 1918, Final Edition, Image 18, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Fulton 220k Wreck of the former Fulton in Russian service, 2014. Image and text provided by Last Dive "Soma" courtesy of Andrey Kazurov.

Crew Contact And Reunion Information
Not Applicable to this Vessel
Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
Submarines of the Russian and Soviet navies, 1718-1990 By Norman Polmar, Jurrien Noot
Som class submarine @wikipedia.org
Through the Looking Glass, a Historic Look at Submarines

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