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NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


WWII U-Boats


U-505


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Radio Call Sign: November - Quebec - Whiskey - Tango

(Type IXC)
Text courtesy of uboat.net
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U-boats398kPillsbury's (DE-133) motor whaleboat approaches the damaged, but still circling U-boat. The brave men aboard this small boat were the first to board U-505. Together, they earned a Medal of Honor, two Navy Crosses and nine Silver Stars for their part in the capture of U-505. USN photo & text courtesy of USS Guadalcanal Task Group 22.3 Association via Mike Green.
U-boats568kA boarding party from the Pillsbury (DE-133) works to secure a tow line to the newly captured German U-505 on 4 June 1944. Note the large U.S. flag flying from the periscope. While the U-505 has been on exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry in Chicago since 1954, this periscope has been missing from the submarine since the Navy removed it for testing after World War II. The two were recently reunited when the periscope was discovered during the demolition of the Navy's old Arctic Submarine Laboratory in Point Loma, Calif., and it was sent to the museum. It will be reinstalled during the U-boat's current extensive restoration. USN Photo # N-0000X-001 courtesy of news.navy.mil.
U-boats1.50kAn original painting from the Librascope collection depicting the boarding of U-505. Photo submitted by Robert Hurst.
U-boats82kHalftone reproduction of a photograph taken soon after the submarine's capture, copied from the Guadalcanal (CVE-60) Memory Log", page 28.
U.S. Naval Officers shown on the submarine's conning tower are, from right to left:
Commander Earl Trosino, USNR;
Captain Daniel V. Gallery, Jr., USN, Commanding Officer, Guadalcanal; and
Lieutenant Junior Grade Albert L. David, USN, who was posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor for leading the boarding party that captured the submarine and carried out initial salvage operations.
Note the United States flag flying above the German Navy ensign.
U-505 was the first enemy warship captured on the high seas by the U.S. Navy since 1815.
USNHC photo # NH 105857, courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation, Washington, DC.
U-boats56kCaptain Daniel V. Gallery, USN, commander of Guadalcanal (CVE-60) Task Group concerning the capture of German submarine U-505 on 4 June 1944.Photo from candotg.org/Awards submitted by Bill Gonyo.
U-boats56kMembers of the first boarding party from the Pillsbury (DE-133). Left to Right: C. A. Mocarski GM 2/c, W. R. Riendeau EM 2/c, G. W. Jacobson CMoMM, Z. B. Lukosius MoMM 1/c, G. F. Hohne SM 2/c, W. M. Pickels BM 2/c, S. E. Wdowiak RM 2/c, A. W. Knispel TM 2/c. Not shown are: Lt(jg) A. L. David, E. J. Beavers S 1/c and R. R. Jenkins MoMM 3/c who remained aboard U-505 to assist the later boarding parties and the Coxswain P. N. Trusheim Cox who remained aboard his motor whaleboat. This photo was taken by Cliff Werlla aboard the Guadalcanal (CVE-60). Photo from candotg.org/Awards submitted by Bill Gonyo.
U-boats39k Lieutenant Junior Grade Albert L. David, USN.
Halftone reproduction of a photograph, copied from the official publication "Medal of Honor, 1861-1949, The Navy", page 172.
Albert L. David was awarded the Medal of Honor for "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity" on 4 June 1944, when he led a boarding party from Pillsbury (DE-133) to capture the German submarine U-505 after it had been forced to the surface. Though the submarine could have sunk or blown up at any time during the operation, David directed initial salvage efforts and ensured it was kept afloat. This was the first capture of an enemy warship on the high seas since 1815.
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105854.
U-boats523kGerman crewmen from the captured submarine, U-505, ascend a Jacobs ladder to board Guadalcanal (CVE-60). With them, they bring the body of the only casualty, a German sailor killed by strafing when he attempted to man a gun on board the U-boat, 4 June 1944.Photograph # 80-G-49173, now in the collections of the National Archives, courtesy of National Museum of the U.S. Navy via flickr.com.
U-boats260kSalvage parties at work on U-505's bow and conning tower as Guadalcanal (CVE-60) approaches to take German submarine U-505 in tow, June 1944.Photograph # 80-G-49173, courtesy of National Museum of the U.S. Navy, NHHC Photograph Collection, via flickr.com.
U-boats71k"On 16 May 1945 a public announcement went out about the capture of U-505, and it was decided that with this publicity U-505 should be sent on two War Bond Tours. Control of the U-Boat was changed from Naval Intelligence to the Submarine Command, and a crew of US Navy submarine officers and ratings took over U-505. The first Tour took place between 23 May and 7 July, starting in Philadelphia, and then to New York, Boston, Baltimore, Washington and Norfolk, between returning to New London. For the initial part of the Tour the escort vessel was PCE-846, and then the escort duties were taken over by Otter. On 1 August Neunzer (DE-150) escorted U-505 on it's second War Bond Tour, the first part of which involved visits to ports on the north-east coast, and the second part of which involved visits to ports further south, as well as the Gulf ports of Tampa, Pensacola, New Orleans and Mobile, arriving at Key West, FL (for the 2nd time) on 3 January 1946. U-505 then returned to Boston Navy Yard, arriving there on 12 January. Neunzer and U-505 are pictured in Wilmington, Delaware". Text courtesy of Derek Waller
Photo courtesy of John Strawbridge from desausa.org.
U-boats677k"Captured submarine draws bond buyers", 23 May 1945.
Purchasers of war bonds on the deck of U-505.
Photo courtesy of the George D. McDowell Philadelphia Evening Bulletin Photographs @ digital.library.temple.edu
Photo added 09/12/17.
U-boats133kNeunzer (DE-150) escorting the U-505 in Wilmington Delaware in 1945. Photo courtesy of John Strawbridge from desausa.org.
U-2513174kU-boats at New London: U-2513, U-3008 & possibly U-505, circa 1945. Photo i.d. courtesy of John Hart, Ric Hedman, Gudmundur Helgason, John Hummel & Robert Morqan.
USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com
U-boats32kBow on view of the U-505 with the Ray (SS-271) at New London, Conn., on 5 October 1945.Photo from the collection of Arthur Laughrun, submitted by Jerry Laughrun.
U-boats51kU-505 with the Ray (SS-271) at New London, Conn., on 5 October 1945.Photo from the collection of Arthur Laughrun, submitted by Jerry Laughrun.
U-boats142k"This photo was taken either on the first War Bond Tour with PCE 846 or on the second Tour with Neunzer (DE-150) as U-505 passed under the Brooklyn Bridge. It was not until 4 May 1945 that the German Naval Command ordered all U-boats to stop all hostile action against Allied shipping. Three days later, Germany officially surrendered to the Allies. With the U-boat threat eliminated, the U.S. Navy no longer needed to keep U-505's presence in Bermuda a secret, and a press release was issued on 16 May 1945, detailing the capture and salvage effort. In the months that followed, U-505 went on two tours as part of the US Government's Seventh War Loan drive to raise funds for the war against Japan. Between 23 may 1945 and 8 January 1946, the U-Boat stopped at more than 20 East Coast and Gulf ports, where spectators could climb aboard in exchange for purchasing War Bonds".Text courtesy of Derek Waller
Photo courtesy of msichicago.org.
Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago.
U-boats 746k Portrait of a crew of US Navy servicemen as they pose on the deck of the captured German submarine U-505 during a War Bonds tour, in Miami, Florida, November, 1945. Photo by Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago/Getty Images courtesy of gettyimages.com.
U-boats115kBy 1946, the Navy had extracted all the information and technology it needed from the U-505. With no reason to keep the sub, the Navy planned to use her for target practice. The story of the U-505 would have ended there were it not for Retired Admiral Daniel V. Gallery, the Museum of Science and Industry and the people of Chicago.
A Chicago native, Gallery was looking for a permanent home for the U-505 in his hometown. As luck would have it, the Museum had long been searching for a submarine for its collection. In 1953, Gallery and Museum President Lenox Lohr convinced Under Secretary of the Navy Charles S. Thomas to give the sub to the Museum. The only catch was that the Navy refused to cover the cost of the move. In response, the Museum, the City of Chicago and private groups banded together to raise the $250,000 that would be necessary to repair, move and install the sub for exhibition.
Photo & text courtesy of msichicago.org.
Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago.
U-boats508k U-505 taken by Richard Cosby as the boat was towed into the Chicago River, in June 1954. This was just prior to the boat's instalment at the Museum of Science and Industry.Photos courtesy of Richard Cosby. Images from uboatarchive.net & submitted by Robert Hurst.
U-boats146kLike the capture and salvage efforts, bringing the U-505 to Chicago proved a monumental undertaking. On 15 May 1954, a tugboat began towing the sub from Portsmouth, New Hampshire, where she was being stored. The tow covered 3,000 miles through 28 locks on the St. Lawrence River, and through four of the five Great Lakes.
The U-505 arrived in Chicago on 26 June 1954, only to face another major hurdle: an 800-foot overland trip from Lake Michigan to the Museum. The task required extensive planning to cross Lake Shore Drive without destroying the pavement and tying up traffic. Engineers designed an elaborate rail and roller system to move the heavy sub out of the water and over the land. The City closed Lake Shore Drive the night of 2 September 1954 to allow the sub to cross. It took another week for the sub to complete its journey from the road to the Museum.
On 25 September 1954, the U-505 was dedicated as a war memorial and a permanent exhibit at the Museum of Science and Industry. In 1989,the sub was also designated as a National Historic Landmark. The U-505 is the only Type IX-C U-boat in existence today.
Photo & text courtesy of msichicago.org.
Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago.
U-boats835kU-505 history.Photo courtesy of Ron Reeves.
U-boats491kU-505 history.Photo courtesy of Ron Reeves.
U-boats205kThree photo PDF of the U-505 during a bonds drive. Photos courtesty of Ron Reeves.
U-boats 651k The captured German submarine U-505 docks at the US Ship Building Company on 2 July 1954. Photo by Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago/Getty Images courtesy of gettyimages.com.
U-boats 801k An image of the captured German submarine U-505 in shoring and docking operations at the dry docks of the Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company, Oak Brook, Illinois, 2 July 1954. Photo by Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago/Getty Images courtesy of gettyimages.com.
U-boats 292k A close-up image of the captured German submarine U-505 in the dry docks of the Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company, Oak Brook, Illinois, 7 July 1954. Workers remove the Pig Iron from the bottom of the vessel to be restored before it is moved to the Museum of Science and Industry. Photo by Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago/Getty Images courtesy of gettyimages.com.
U-boats 657k An image of the captured German submarine U-505 in dry dock at the Great Lakes Dredge and Dock Company, Oak Brook, Illinois, 6 August 1954. There it was restored before it was moved to the Museum of Science and Industry. Photo by Museum of Science and Industry, Chicago/Getty Images courtesy of gettyimages.com.
U-boats51kU-505 on display at the Museum of Science & Industry in Chicago. Photo courtesy of Historic Naval Ships Association (hnsa.org.)
U-boats297kThree photo PDF of the U-505 in Museum of Science & Industry in Chicago.Photos courtesty of John Hummel.
U-boats149kA view of the Chicago skyline from U-505's conning tower in 1977; something the boat's builders never took into consideration when it was on the building blocks.Photo from the collection of John MacKay.
U-boats152kThe U-505 sails through a calm sea of air.Photo from the collection of John MacKay.
U-boats100kConning tower in the trees.Photo from the collection of John MacKay.
U-boats151kA view of the U-505's upper 20mm guns.Photo from the collection of John MacKay.
U-boats262kStarboard quarter view of the U-505, 2009. Photo courtesy of John Hummel.
U-boats261kView of the conning tower & 20 mm anti-aircraft gun, 2009. Photo courtesy of John Hummel.


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