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NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


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Beach
Submarine
NR Saga of Our Submarines Is a Thriller
"Overdue. Presumed lost."
Thus were written the epitaphs of more than twoscore of our submarines in the Pacific in World War II. But behind these three fateful words lies a story of extreme heroism, iron nerves, triumph, desperation and numbing fear. It's a story hitherto untold in its full sweep.
Now you can share these dramatic episodes with a skipper who survived to tell you about them. Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN, relates his spine tingling story in "Submarine!" A serialization of the best-seller beginning....
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 10 August  1952,  Image 91 & 07 November 1952, Image 1 courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Trigger
0823758
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
An Undersea Prowler Gets Its Baptism of Fire In Near-Fatal Clash With Enemy Destroyer.
DRAWING A BEAD—Crewmen line up an enemy ship for a perfect shot. This picture was taken through the periscope of a submarine during warfare in the Pacific.
USN photo
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star.[volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 10 November 1952, Image 5, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
197
0819740
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
Crews Stunned to Learn They Were Waging Useless Battle With Defective Torpedoes
FAULTY TORPEDOES!—It Was weapons like these that Seawolf (SS-197) carried across many perilous miles of the Pacific, only to find them defective. Photo shows how torpedoes are stored in a submarine.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star.[volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 11 November 1952, Image 5, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Wahoo
0823885a
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
Daring Skipper Slips Into Enemy Staging Area And by Nerve and Luck Gets Out Again.
WAHOO (SS-238) SHOWED THE WAY
—This is Wahoo, the submarine which gave the Navy a dramatic lesson in the way to dispose of enemy destroyers.
USN photo
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star.[volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 12 November 1952, Image 4, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Wahoo
0823885
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
Wahoo's (SS-238) Battle With Four Japanese Ships Ends After 13 Hours With All Four Sunk
COMMANDER IN ACTION—This picture was taken in the conning tower of Wahoo during the battle described in today's episode of “Submarine.” At left is Lt. Comdr. Dudley W. Morton, commanding officer of Wahoo.
USN photo
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star.[volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 13 November 1952, Image 5, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Wahoo
0823885b
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
Wahoo (SS-238) Rides Into Dangerous Japanese Waters On a Heart-Breaking and Tragic Mission
ASLEEP IN THE DEEP—This scene through the periscope of the submarine Wahoo shows another Japanese freighter as it heads for the bottom, a victim of the sub's torpedoes.
USN photo
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star.[volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 14 November 1952, Image 5, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Trigger
0823760
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
Trigger (SS-237) Survives Vicious Depth Charge Pounding After Her Crippling Attack on New Carrier.
COMDR. J. H. LEWIS. First Skipper of Trigger.
LT. COMDR. ROY BENSON. Took command when Comdr. Lewis was hospitalized.
USN photo
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star.[volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 15 November 1952, Image 5, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
197
0819739
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
Gallant Seawolf (SS-197) Comes to End of Trail After Tour In Which Four Japanese Ships Are Sent to Bottom.

TARGET IN PERISCOPE—This photo, taken through the periscope of a United States submarine in the Pacific illustrates the sight that is thrilling even to a veteran submariner
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star.[volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 17 November 1952, Image 5, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Trigger
0823761
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
Perfecting Ice Cream Freezer for Cramped U-Boat Calls for Experiment and Genius for Gadgets.
NO SPACE TO SPARE
This is the commanding officer's quarters in a submarine. A look at the cramped space will make it clear why the crew of the Trigger (SS-237) had such a hard time finding an available cranny for its ice cream freezer.
USN photo
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star.[volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 18 November 1952, Image 5, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
257
0825728
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
Skipper of Harder (SS-257) Won Congressional Medal, Then Sacrificed His Ship to Save Another.

FIGHTING SUBMARINE—The Harder, a fighter among fighters whose exploits became legendary in the Navy. On her fifth war patrol, the Harder sank five Japanese destroyers in four days.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star.[volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 19 November 1952, Image 4, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Trigger
0823759
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
Trigger (SS-237), a Night fighter, Sends Four Ships Down And Hits Another One in Single Evening.
DEATH FOR MERCHANTMAN—Asight that chills the spine of a merchant ship skipper in wartime—a submarine on the surface.
USN photo
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star.[volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 20 November 1952, Image 5, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
311
0831133
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
Japanese Navy Pinned Hopes on Great Carrier, But the Archerfish (SS-311) Had Some Other Ideas
KILLER SHlP—Here is the submarine that broke the heart of the Japanese navy—the Archerfish, powerful giant killer of the seas.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star.[volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 21 November 1952, Image 5, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
311
0831133a
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
Archerfish (SS-311) Mortally Wounds Great Enemy Carrier After Spine-Tingling Game of Cat-and-Mouse.
STALKING THE ENEMY—A tense scene like this was enacted many times in Archerfish as she relentlessly pursued her quarry, a great Japanese aircraft carrier. Here submarine officers man their tracking stations to plot every minute of their own course and position as well as that of the enemy so they will be in favorable position when the time comes for attack.
USN photo
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star.[volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 22 November 1952, Image 5, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Trigger
0823762
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
Trigger (SS-237) Steals Convoy From Under Nose of Sister Sub, Much to the Discomfort of the Japanese
GOING DOWN—It is always a tense moment in a submarine when she dives. Here two sailors watch the depth gauge which tells how far the craft is under water.
USN photo
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star.[volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 24 November 1952, Image 5, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
306
0830631
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
The Gunboat Gave Tang (SS-306) an Excruciating Pounding, But Revenge Was Dear to Heart of This Sub
OUTSTANDING KILLER
—This is Tang, which had one skipper and whose life was lived in the short span of one year. And in that year Tang and her captain, Dick O'Kane, achieved the most outstanding record of damage and destruction to enemy shipping ever credited to one submarine. Here Tang was photographed as she returned to Pearl Harbor in April, 1944, after having rescued 22 carrier-based pilots whose planes had been forced down at sea during an attack on the Japanese island naval base of Truk.
USN photo
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star.[volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 25 November 1952, Image 5, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
306
0830630
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
Tang (SS-306) Almost Wiped Out a Japanese Convoy, But Fell Victim to One of Her Own Torpedoes.
WATCHING HER GO DOWN—Here is the crowded control room of a modern United States submarine. The big dial in the center is the diving gauge, which shows how far the submarine is under the surface. The sailor in the foreground uses the large wheel to operate a set of diving planes which control the angle at which the craft submerges or surfaces.
USN photo
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star.[volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 26 November 1952, Image 27, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
SS 310
0831030
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
The Hunter Is Hunted as the Batfish (SS-310) Stalks And Kills Off a Class 1 Japanese U-Boat.
HUNTRESS OF THE SEA—
It was this submarine, Batfish, commanded by John Fyfe, which taught the Navy how a submarine can hunt an enemy submarine in the most thrilling and chiling of all sea actions.
DINNER FOR A SUBMARINER—Comdr. John K. Fyfe, skipper of Batfish, smiles as a steward's mate serves juicy steak in the submarine's wardroom. The officer on Comdr. Fyfe's left is Lt. Comdr. Walter Small, who later took command of the vessel.
USN photos.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star. Evening Star. [volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 27 November 1952, Image 5, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Piper
0840923
NR SUBMARINE: By Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN
Piper (SS-409) and Skipper Barely Slipped Through Mine Net Near War's End
AUTHOR IN NEW COMMAND—Comdr. Edward L. Beach, USN, author of "Submarine," as he looks today. Comdr. Beach was photographed on the deck of his new command, a modern submarine named Trigger (SS-564), for his first undersea craft, Trigger (SS-237).
USN photo
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star.[volume] (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 29 November 1952, Image 13, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.

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