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NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Contributed by Mike Smolinski

Triton (SSRN-586) (SSN-586)

Radio Call Sign: November - Delta - Bravo - Romeo

Unit Awards, Campaign and Service Medals and Ribbons


Presidential Unit Citation

Triton Class Radar Picket Submarine: Laid down, 29 May 1956, at the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics Corp. Groton, CT; Launched, 19 August 1958; Commissioned, USS Triton (SSRN-586), 10 November 1959; Reclassified Attack Submarine, (SSN-586), 1 March 1961; Decommissioned, 3 May 1969, at New London, CT.; Laid up in the Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Norfolk, VA.; Struck from the Naval Register, 30 April 1986; Final Disposition, in storage at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA., awaiting processing through the Nuclear Powered Ship and Submarine Recycling Program. She is scheduled for a 15-year dry-docked hull inspection in October 2009, after which it is expected that she will finally be recycled.
Triton received the Presidential Unit Citation, and a Navy Unit Commendation.

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 5,963 t., Submerged: 7,773 t.; Length 447' ; Beam 37'; Speed, Surfaced 30+ kts, Submerged 27+ kts; Dept Limit, 700'; Complement 159; Armament, six 21" torpedo tubes, 4 forward, 2 aft), Fire Control System MK-101; Propulsion, two S4G nuclear reactors, two 5-bladed propellers.
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Submarine History Profiles: 105kSubmarine History Profiles:
First true submarine: Holland (SS-01) in 1900.
First U.S. Diesel submarine:E-1 (SS-24) in 1911.
First Fleet boat:V-1 (SS-163) in 1922.
First GUPPY: Odax (SS-484) in 1947.
First nuclear powered submarine:Nautilus (SSN-571) in 1954.
First submarine to completely circumnavigate the earth submerged:Triton (SSRN-586) in 1959.
Latest generation of U.S. ballistic submarines:Ohio (SSBN-726), in 1980.
US Navy photo courtesy of Robert Hall. Photo i.d. courtesy of Dave Johnston.
Francis Scott Key171kNuclear submarine lineup depicting the current 19 different types.US Navy photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Triton3.45kSeven photo PDF of building plans for the Triton (SSRN-586). PDF courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Triton 161k Construction of the Triton (SSRN-586) at the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics Corp. Groton, CT. Her huge size becomes apparent when comparing with the figures in the background. Photo & partial text courtesy of garrygray.tripod.com
Triton 61k Fitting Triton's (SSRN-586) sail to hull. The sail structure is 74 feet long, 21 feet longer than the first Holland (SS-1) submarine built for the US Navy. Photo & text courtesy of garrygray.tripod.com
Triton 232k The Triton (SSRN-586) is ready for launching on 19 August 1958. US Navy photo # NPC 1040000 courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Triton340kThe Triton (SSRN-586) was sponsored by Mrs. John Will on 19 August 1958.Text courtesy of DANFS.
Photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Triton295k Triton (SSRN-586) down the launching ways at General Dynamics Corp. Electric Boat Shipyard at Groton, CT., on 19 August 1958. United Press International Photo courtesy of Ron Reeves.
Triton674k Triton (SSRN-586) launching at General Dynamics Corp. Electric Boat Shipyard at Groton, CT., on 19 August 1958. Official USN photo from garrygray.tripod.com via Robert Hurst.
Triton413k Triton (SSRN-586) undergoing post-launch fitting out at General Dynamics' Electric Boat Shipyard at Groton, CT. Official USN photo from garrygray.tripod.com via Robert Hurst.
Triton 262k Triton (SSRN-586) just after launching on 19 August 1958. Notice that 12 feet from the top of the sail are not yet attached. Photo & text courtesy of garrygray.tripod.com
Nuclear Submarine Profiles497k20 October 1958: Fleet Admiral Earl Mountbatten, First Sea Lord of the British Admirality, tries his hand at operating the prototype nuclear reactor of the Triton (SSRN-586), world's largest submarine.Looking on at the AEC Knools laboratory are Lt. Leighton, AEC Project officer & Admiral Hyman G. Rickover, director of the US Naval Reactors Branch. AP Wirephoto courtesy of Tommy Trampp.
Skipjack & Triton 54k Skipjack (SS-585) & Triton (SSRN-586). Commemorative postal cover issued on the occasion of the first day in commission of the Triton, 10 November 1959. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Triton 232k Commissioning of the Triton (SSRN-586), 10 November 1959. The Skipjack (SS-585) is in the background. She had been commissioned on 15 April 1959. Courtesy of Norm Gladd. Photo i.d. courtesy of garrygray.tripod.com
Triton674k Triton (SSRN-586) undergoing post-launch fitting out at General Dynamics' Electric Boat Shipyard at Groton, CT. Official USN photo from garrygray.tripod.com via Robert Hurst.
Submarine Silhouettes 1960179kSubmarine Silhouettes of 1960:
Nautilus (SSN-571), Seawolf (SSN-575), Skate (SSN-578), Skipjack (SS-585), Triton (SSRN-586), Halibut (SSGN-587), Thresher (SSN-593), Tullibee (SSN-597), George Washington (SSBN-598), & Ethan Allen (SSBN-608) classes.
U.S. Navy Photograph submitted by Ron Titus, courtesy of Ingersoll-Rand. Corp.
Nuclear Submarine Profiles187kNuclear Submarine Profiles 1960:
Nautilus (SSN-571),
Seawolf (SSN-575),
Triton (SSRN-586),
Skate (SSN-578) & Skipjack (SS-585) classes,
Halibut (SSGN-587) & Tullibee (SSN-597) classes,
George Washington (SSBN-598) &
Thresher (SSN-593) classes.
US Navy photo courtesy of Ron Titus courtesy of Ingersoll-Rand. Corp. Photo i.d. courtesy of Dave Johnston.
Triton417kCaptain Edward L Beach, USN, announcing the start of Operation Sandblast to the crew onboard Triton (SSRN-586), 17 February 1960. Official U.S. Navy photograph courtesy of Commander Joseph Baylor Roberts, USNR via Robert Hurst.
Triton268kCaptain Edward L Beach, USN, Commanding Officer of the nuclear submarine Triton (SSRN-586), at the periscope of his ship during her shakedown cruise around the world submerged.USN Photo courtesy of the Bettmann collection via Robert Hurst.
Triton 407k Triton (SSRN-586) heading out for the beginning of the circumnavigation. Photo courtesy of the Triton's (SSRN-586) photographer, William Hadley via Garry Gray.
Triton176kCaptain Edward L Beach, USN, plots the course with the sub's executive and operation officer. Note - Lt. Commander Will M. Adams is the executive officer, and Lt. Commander Robert W. Bulmer is the operations officer. Photo courtesy Commander Joseph Baynor Roberts, USNR - U.S. Navy Office of Information from "Special Supplement - 12,000 Leagues under the Sea" - All Hands - July 1960, p. 53, via Robert Hurst.
Triton332kPetty Officer Edward C. Carbullido and Captain Edard L. Beach onboard Triton (SSRN-586) off Guam, 28 March 1960. Official U.S. Navy Photograph from Unofficial USS Triton Web Site, via Robert Hurst.
Triton 60k Commemorative postal cover issued on the occasion on the Triton (SSRN-586) having completed the first submerged circumnavigation of the earth, 10 April 1960, 60 days and 21 hours. Capt. Edward L. "Ned" Beach, Jr., signature appears at top. Partial text courtesy of DANFS. Photo courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Triton 25k The national ensign flies from the sail of the Triton (SSRN-586) following her submerged circumnavigation of the earth, 10 April 1960. USN photo courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Scorpion 357k The beginning of Scorpion (SSN-589) as a commissioned warship, 29 July 1960. The Triton (SSRN-586) is seen behind her. Following her post-shakedown availability, Triton assumed her duties as a radar picket submarine in August 1960. Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
US Navy photo # USN 1051824 courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Triton 248k An undated bow view of the nuclear-powered radar picket submarine Triton (SSRN-586) at rest. U.S. National Archives photo from An Illustrated History of the United States Navy by Chester G. Hearn & submitted by Robert Hurst.
Triton 114k The Triton (SSRN-586) threaded Hilutangan channel off Mactan Island, the Philippines, with sonar feelers. Photo from the book Great Adventures with National Geographic, 1963. Page 142.
Triton 35k In deep-water channels Triton (SSRN-586) wove through the Indies. Currents at Lombok Strait dropped her 125 feet in seconds. Photo from the book Great Adventures with National Geographic, 1963. Page 143.
Triton 476k The Triton (SSRN-586) coming home after the circumnavigation. Photo courtesy of the Triton's (SSRN-586) photographer, William Hadley via Garry Gray.
Triton 423k Captain Beach on the bridge of the Triton (SSRN-586). Photo courtesy of the Triton's (SSRN-586) photographer, William Hadley via Garry Gray.
Triton 176k Helicopter dropping box to Triton (SSRN-586) off New London, CT., May 1960. Photographer: Hank Walker, courtesy of life.time.com
Triton 406k Helicopter picking up Captain Beach for transfer to the White House. Photo courtesy of the Triton's (SSRN-586) photographer, William Hadley via Garry Gray.
Triton 107k Triton (SSRN-586), New London, CT., May 1960. Photographer: Yale Joel, courtesy of life.time.com
Triton 117k US Navy Capt. Edward L. Beach (center) receiving decoration from Pres. Dwight D. Eisenhower (R) after historic underwater voyage around the world as Adm. Hyman G. Rickover looks on in New London, CT., May 1960. Photographer: Yale Joel, courtesy of life.time.com
Triton 129k Triton's (SSRN-586) crew members standing behind their wives and new babies, New London, CT., May 1960. Photographer: Joseph Scherschel, courtesy of life.time.com
Triton 15k A plaque created by the crew of Triton (SSRN-586) to commemorate Ferdinand Magellan's and their circumnavigations of the world. Photo courtesy of "Around the World Submerged" by Captain Edward L. Beach via Robert Hurst.
Triton 320k Capt. Edward L. "Ned" Beach, Jr., on the Triton (SSRN-586), circa early 1960's. U.S. Navy photo # N-00000000B-004 courtesy of the U.S. Naval Institute / news.navy.mil.
Triton 87k 1960's photo of Howard W. Gilmore (AS-16) with submarines alongside: Triton (SSRN-586), Sea Robin (SS-407), unknown SSK and Becuna (SS-319). Courtesy of John Hummel.
Triton890k On 13 April 1964, Triton (SSRN-586) became the flagship for the Submarine Force, Atlantic Fleet, and served in that role until relieved by submarine RAY (SSN-653) on 1 June 1967.
She appears here on 2 October 1964.
Text courtesy of DANFS.
USN photo # NPC 1114747, courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Photo added 10/10/14.
Shark, Triton, Redfin & Requin 127k Shark (SSN-591), in port at San Juan, PR., 1965. Triton (SSN-586) on left, you just see her topside. Redfin, (SS-272) and Requin (SS-481) are outboard of her. Photographed and contributed courtesy of John Hummel.
Triton 348k Triton (SSRN-586), date and place unknown. USN photo courtesy of csp.navy
Triton 207k Unknown dated still of the Triton (SSRN-586) underway from a 16mm film clip. Photo courtesy of periscopefilm.com.
Triton 40k The inactivated Triton (SSRN-586) is shown here being moved from Norfolk VA, on her way to Bremerton, Washington in August 1983. Photo courtesy of Garry Gray via Ron Reeves.
PSNSY291k"Sign of the times." March 1994 photo of Nuclear submarines at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard waiting in line for scrapping.
Top row left to right are Ethan Allen (SSBN-608), Seawolf (SSN-575), Plunger (SSN-595), Shark (SSN-591), Nathanael Greene (SSBN-636), Glenard P. Lipscomb (SSN-685) alongside Sperry (AS-12), with Triton (SSRN-586) across the pier from the Sperry .
Bottom row, from left to right Thomas A. Edison (SSBN-610), Skipjack (SS-585), Snook (SSN-592), Henry Clay (SSBN-625), Lapon (SSN-661), Dace (SSN-607), Skate (SSN-578), Swordfish (SSN-579), Sargo (SSN-583) , Seadragon (SSN-584).
Across the pier are Thomas Jefferson (SSBN-618), and not in view, Patrick Henry (SSBN-599), George Washington (SSBN-598),Barb (SSN-596) & Sea Devil (SSN-664).
There are so many submarines at PSNSY that the yard is running out of pier space.
Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Triton 101k Triton (SSRN-586) at the Puget Sound Naval Shipyard on 17 July 1998. In the right background the Lapon (SSN-661) waits its turn to be recycled through the Navy's nuclear surface and submarine recycling program Photo taken from Warship Bone yards, by Kit and Carolyn Bonner & submitted by Robert Hurst.
Triton 30k Triton (SSRN-586) photo taken in October 1998 by a Independence (CVA-62) crew member. Note Long Beach (CGN-9) and Lapon (SSN-661) in background. Courtesy of Don Shelton.
Triton 19k Triton (SSRN-586) photo taken in October 1998 by a Independence (CVA-62) crew member. Lapon (SSN-661) in background. Courtesy of Don Shelton.
Triton 30k Triton (SSRN-586) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, circa 2006. Photo courtesy of submarinesailor.com courtesy of Harry Higgins.
Trigger 315k Captain Edward L. Beach won fame as a submarine commander and best-selling author describing life beneath the waves. The son of a career naval officer, Beach was born in Palo Alto, California in 1918. He graduated from the U.S. Naval Academy in 1939 and from Submarine School in 1941.
During World War II, he served as Damage Control Assistant, Chief Engineer, and Executive Officer of Trigger (SS-237), during which time she was one of the highest scoring submarines in the force. He received the Navy Cross for his service as Executive Officer of Tirante (SS-420) in early 1945. Beach also made one wartime patrol as commanding officer of Piper (SS-409).
Following the war, he commanded Amberjack (SS-522), Trigger (SS-564), and Triton (SSRN-586), and served as naval aide to President Dwight D. Eisenhower.
Between February and May 1960, Triton, under Beach's command, made the first submerged circumnavigation of the globe. This 83-day voyage proved the ability of nuclear-powered submarines to conduct long-duration operations in any part of the ocean.
Beach has also won renown as the author of three submarine novels, including the best selling "Run Silent, Run Deep" "Dust on the Sea," and "Cold is the Sea." He also wrote several nonfiction works, including "Submarine," "Around the World Submerged," "Wreck of the Memphis," "The United States Navy: 200 Years," and his autobiography, "Salt and Steel."
"Run Silent, Run Deep" was made into a popular movie starring Clark Gable and Burt Lancaster. In an interview with All Hands Magazine, a U.S. Navy internal information periodical, he didn't like the movie because it wasn't true to the Navy that I saw and tried to describe." He died 1 December 2002 at his Washington, D.C. home. Beach is survived by his wife Ingrid, three children, and four grandchildren.
U.S. Navy photo # N-0000B-001 courtesy of the U.S. Naval Institute / news.navy.mil.
Triton 480k Kai-Huei Yau/Herald - Roger Wright, ports engineer for the Port of Benton, fields questions from Jim Stoffels of Richland, Dale Anderson of Richland and Susan Chester of Cameron Park, Calif. Friday next to pieces of the Triton's (SSRN-586) sail. The decommissioned submarine's sail, which is the the large tower-like structure on top of submarines, is currently in four pieces, but will be reconstructed around the sub's conning tower for the Port of Benton's Triton Submarine Memorial Park. The park will honor nuclear powered vessels and the role the port has played in their decommissioning.
Inside the Triton's (SSRN-586) Conning Tower. PDF of 10 photos.
Courtesy of tri-cityherald.com via thesubreport.blogspot.com.

View the Triton (SSN-586)
DANFS history entry located on the Haze Gray & Underway
Crew Contact And Reunion Information
U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation
Fleet Reserve Association

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