Please report any broken links or trouble you might come across to the Webmaster.
Please take a moment to let us know so that we can correct any problems and make your visit as enjoyable and as informative as possible.


NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Decal by unlimiteddetails.com
Radio Call Sign: November - Bravo - Xray - Uniform

Queenfish (SSN-651)


Sturgeon Class Attack Submarine: Laid down, 11 May 1964, at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Newport News, VA.; Launched, 25 February 1966; Commissioned, USS Queenfish (SSN-651), 6 December 1966; Decommissioned, and simultaneously struck from the Naval Register, 14 April 1992; Final Disposition, disposed of through NPSSRP (Nuclear Powered Ship and Submarine Recycling Program) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA., 7 April 1993.

Specifications: Displacement, Surfaced: 3,640 t., Submerged: 4,640 t.; Length 292' 3"; Beam 31' 8"; Draft 28' 8"; Speed, Surfaced 15 kts, Submerged 25 kts; Depth limit 1,300'; Complement 108; Armament, four 21" torpedo tubes amidships aft of bow, MK 48 Torpedoes, UUM-44A SUBROC, UGM-84A/C Harpoon, MK 57 deep water mines, MK 60 CAPTOR mines; Combat Sensors, Radar, BPS-14/15 surface search, Sonars, BQQ-5 multi-function bow mounted, BQR-7 passive in submarines with BQQ-2, BQS-12 active 7, TB-16 or TB-23 towed array, EW Systems, WLQ-4(V), WLR-4(V), WLR-9 ; Propulsion System, one S5W nuclear reactor, two steam turbines, one propeller, 15,000 shp.
Click On Image
For Full Size Image
SizeImage DescriptionContributed By / Source
Queenfish26kThe Queenfish (SSN-651) slides down the ways at Newport News Shipbuilding and Dry Dock Co., Newport News, VA. on 25 February 1966.Photo courtesy of Joe Burson / queenfish.org & submitted by Bill Gonyo.
Queenfish765kCommissioning of the Queenfish (SSN-651) on 6 December 1966.USN photos courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Photos added 07/29/12.
Queenfish602kPre-commissioning photo of the Queenfish (SSN-651), December 1966.USN photo # NPC K-34617, courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Photo added 07/29/12.
Queenfish265kPacific Queenfish (SSN-651) on 14 September 1967.USN photo # NPC KN-15094, courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Photo added 07/29/12.
Sturgeon Class43k Oil on canvas painting by the artist Jim Christley entitled "Trailing".
During the Cold War the US Naval Submarine Force was tasked with keeping tabs on Soviet Naval movements in particular, the Soviet Submarine Force. Submarines of the Sturgeon Class were well suited to this task and often trailed Soviet submarines for days reporting on their movements and recording noise signatures. In this image, such a trailing has turned into a close aboard encounter as a Soviet Viktor III Class has turned to port to check his baffles (to listen to see if anyone is immediately astern). A trailing Sturgeon has stopped his screw and gone quiet. Extending far behind the US submarine is its towed array sonar which assists in giving a clear picture of the ocean's acoustics.
Photo & text courtesy of subart.net.
Submerged submarines145kSubmerged submarines in tandem.U.S. Navy Photo courtesy of Robert Hall.
Queenfish38kSanta Claus greets crewmen of the Queenfish (SSN-651) at the North Pole (Chief Quartermaster Jack Pataterson as Santa), summer 1970.
USN photo courtesy of USNI.
Queenfish80kQueenfish (SSN-651) at the North Pole, summer 1970.
US Navy photo, courtesy - DOE, The Atomic Century web site.
Queenfish36kQueenfish (SSN-651) at the North Pole, summer 1970.
USN photo courtesy of Arctic Submarine Laboratory.
Queenfish77k The sun casts a shadow on the Queenfish (SSN-651) as she surfaces in the Arctic pack at a region of thin ice known as a polynya, possibly summer 1970.
USN photo courtesy of Robert Hurst.
Queenfish50kThe Queenfish (SSN-651), surfaced at the North Pole on 5 August, 1970.
USN photo courtesy of Robert Hurst.
Queenfish168kCmdr Bacon of the Diego Garcia Yacht club member Queenfish (SSN-651).USN photo # NPC KN-15094, courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Photo added 07/29/12.
Queenfish60k Under-ice mapper. Commissioned in 1966, the Queenfish (SSN-651) was a nuclear-powered attack submarine, the first in a new class designed with additional abilities for sailing under ice. The Queenfish had upward-looking sonar that could map the jagged underside of Arctic ice and rudders and control surfaces that were reinforced to break through thin ice without damage. USN photo & text courtesy of NY Times from the article: "Queenfish: A Cold War Tale" 18 March 2008, by William J. Broad.
Queenfish72k Two-part mission. The Queenfish (SSN-651) set off in late July 1970 on a mission to survey the undersea Arctic. Although far smaller than the Atlantic or the Pacific, the Arctic Ocean is six times the size of the Mediterranean Sea but still relatively unexplored because of the constantly changing ice cover, which averages 10 feet thick. For the second half of the voyage, the submarine explored the continental shelf off Siberia, within the 230 miles of shore that the Soviet Union claimed as territorial waters but outside the 12 miles that the United States recognized. To avoid identification by the Soviets, all markings on the submarine including the number were removed. USN photo & text courtesy of NY Times from the article: "Queenfish: A Cold War Tale" 18 March 2008, by William J. Broad.
Queenfish49k The Path of the Queenfish (SSN-651).USN photo & text courtesy of NY Times from the article: "Queenfish: A Cold War Tale" 18 March 2008, by William J. Broad courtesy of the book "Unknown Waters," by Dr. Alfred S. McLaren (USN ret).
Queenfish55k Thinning ice. This view through the periscope on 3 August was typical: ice and water. The first half of the Queenfish's (SSN-651) journey retraced most of the path that the Nautilus (SSN-571) took in its historic 1958 trip to the North Pole, the first vessel to travel there under the ice. Alfred S. McLaren, the Queenfish's (SSN-651) commander, wanted to compare the ice conditions of 1970 with those 18 years earlier. The ice had, on average, thinned 28 inches between those two voyages. USN photo & text courtesy of NY Times from the article: "Queenfish: A Cold War Tale" 18 March 2008, by William J. Broad.
Queenfish42k Polar bear watch. Commander McLaren and a crew member stand on watch for polar bears. Later in the voyage, the Queenfish (SSN-651) had a memorable encounter with a polar bear family. USN photo & text courtesy of NY Times from the article: "Queenfish: A Cold War Tale" 18 March 2008, by William J. Broad.
Queenfish54k Makeshift number. On 5 August the Queenfish (SSN-651) became the 10th American submarine to reach the geographic North Pole. It then surfaced through a hole in the ice about 500 yards away. Notice the number. To avoid identification during its secret survey along Siberia, the number and other identifying markings had been removed from the Queenfish. But for these photographs at the North Pole, the crew affixed numbers made out of cardboard. USN photo & text courtesy of NY Times from the article: "Queenfish: A Cold War Tale" 18 March 2008, by William J. Broad.
Queenfish42kPolar photo op. Commander McLaren posing with the Hawaiian state flag at the North Pole. (The home port of the Queenfish (SSN-651) is Pearl Harbor in Hawaii.) The 117 members of the crew had to share the limited amount of clothing deemed acceptable for photographing, including the "submarine sweater" Commander McLaren was wearing. The one hour allocated for photographs stretched to more than six hours. USN photo & text courtesy of NY Times from the article: "Queenfish: A Cold War Tale" 18 March 2008, by William J. Broad.
Queenfish339kThe Queenfish (SSN-651) at the North Pole on 6 August 1970. Text courtesy of NY Times from the article: "Queenfish: A Cold War Tale" 18 March 2008, by William J. Broad. USN photo courtesy of Alfred S. McLaren, Captain, USN (Ret.) via Bill Gonyo.
Queenfish39kA cold swim. A team of scuba divers swam in the 29.5-degree water to take photographs of the underside of the ice. Winds and currents cause ice floes to pile up on each other. Later analysis showed that the ice within eight miles of the North Pole was, on average, 13 feet thick. In parts, where the ice floes piled up, it was close to 58 feet thick; in other spots, where the ice had been pushed aside, there was open water. USN photo & text courtesy of NY Times from the article: "Queenfish: A Cold War Tale" 18 March 2008, by William J. Broad.
Queenfish35kUp scope. Another time, Commander McLaren looked through the periscope and saw ... USN photo & text courtesy of NY Times from the article: "Queenfish: A Cold War Tale" 18 March 2008, by William J. Broad.
Queenfish47kThe three bears. ... a polar bear and two cubs walking on the ice pack. USN photo & text courtesy of NY Times from the article: "Queenfish: A Cold War Tale" 18 March 2008, by William J. Broad.
Queenfish41kBear attack. The polar bears jumped into the water and swam directly at the periscope. "The cross hairs are on her nose," Dr. McLaren recalled in 2002. "And I'm thinking, 'How am I going to explain teeth marks on my periscope when I get back to port.?' " The bear sniffed at the periscope and turned away, with the cubs following.USN photo & text courtesy of NY Times from the article: "Queenfish: A Cold War Tale" 18 March 2008, by William J. Broad.
Queenfish51kTight squeeze. In places, the Queenfish (SSN-651), 54 feet high in the middle, found itself hemmed in by ice above and sea floor below. Scraping the seabed or grazing the overhanging ice could have damaged the propellers or rudder. At one point, the boat entered an underwater ice cul-de-sac. It took an hour for it to back out safely.USN photo & text courtesy of NY Times from the article: "Queenfish: A Cold War Tale" 18 March 2008, by William J. Broad.
Queenfish68kMission accomplished. The Queenfish (SSN-651) passed south through the Bering Strait on 30 August after traveling 3,100 nautical miles along the Siberian coast. It arrived at Pearl Harbor, its home port, on 11 September 1970. (Note that there is no number on its side, unlike the photograph at the North Pole.) USN photo & text courtesy of NY Times from the article: "Queenfish: A Cold War Tale" 18 March 2008, by William J. Broad.
Queenfish91kThe Queenfish (SSN-651) garners her laurels at Submarine Base Pearl Harbor, HI., 1979. Photo queenfish.org courtesy of Roger Buck & submitted by Bill Gonyo.
Queenfish1.03kThirteen page PDF Welcome Aboard the Queenfish (SSN-651), circa 1975.USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
PDF added 07/29/12.
Queenfish67kQueenfish (SSN-651) alongside Pier Sierra 12, Submarine Base Pearl Harbor, HI., May 1985. Photo by Dave Johnston.
Darter, Barbel & Queenfish215kBarbel (SS-580) and Darter (SS-576), at Sub base Pearl Harbor, June 1985. The Topside Watch on the Darter is TMSN(SS) Russ Dzielak and TMSA Jeff Buzzard. Directly astern of the duo is the Queenfish (SSN-651). Photo by Dave Johnston.
Queenfish62kUndated photo of the Queenfish (SSN-651) at Pearl Harbor. U.S. Navy Photo courtesy of Robert Hall.
Queenfish424kA starboard view of the nuclear powered attack submarine Queenfish (SSN-651) underway near Naval Station, Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, 1 Jun 1989.
Defense Visual Information Center photo # DN-SC-92-04502, by OS2 John Bouvia, from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection, courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil.
Queenfish118kUndated photo of the Queenfish (SSN-651) commanded by J.R. Harvey, underway.
Official US Navy photo courtesy of Wendell Royce McLaughlin Jr.
Reactor Compartments83kTrench 94, Hanford Site, Washington, 1994. Hull sections containing defueled reactor compartments of decommissioned nuclear-powered submarines are put in disposal trenches. Once full, the trench will be filled with dirt and buried. The compartments are expected to retain their integrity for more than 600 years. USN photo & partial text courtesy of home.flash.net/~tomj/tunny/chop/rx. & submitted by Jack Treutle.
Spent Fuel569kSealed reactor compartments are shipped by barge out of Puget Sound Naval Base down the coast and along the Columbia River to the port of Benton. There the radioactively-contaminated hull sections are transferred to special multiwheeled high-load trailers for transport to the Hanford Reservation in Washington State. Pictured below is the burial ground for spent fuel of the following 77 nuclear reactor submarines as of March 2003:
Patrick Henry (SSBN-599),
Snook (SSN-592),
George Washington (SSBN-598),
Scamp (SSN-588),
Robert E. Lee (SSBN-601),
Thomas Jefferson (SSBN-618),
Theodore Roosevelt (SSBN-600),
Dace (SSN-607),
John Adams (SSBN-620),
Abraham Lincoln (SSBN-602),
Barb (SSN-596),
Ethan Allen (SSBN-608),
Thomas A. Edison (SSBN-610),
Pollack (SSN-603),
Glenard P. Lipscomb (SSN-685),
James Monroe (SSBN-622),
Skipjack (SS-585),
Nathan Hale (SSBN-623),
Plunger (SSN-595),
Shark (SSN-591),
Lafayette (SSBN-616),
Sam Houston (SSBN-609),
Jack (SSN-605),
Haddo (SSN-604),
Tinosa (SSN-606),
Guardfish (SSN-612),
Permit (SSN-594),
Queenfish (SSN-651),
Ulysses S. Grant (SSBN-631),
John Marshall (SSBN-611),
George C. Marshall (SSBN-654),
Flasher (SSN-613),
Guitarro (SSN-665),
Alexander Hamilton (SSBN-617),
George Washington Carver (SSBN-656),
Tecumseh (SSBN-628),
Halibut (SSGN-587),
Will Rogers (SSBN-659),
Henry L. Stimson (SSBN-655),
Daniel Boone (SSBN-629),
Greenling (SSN-614),
John C. Calhoun (SSBN-630),
Casimir Pulaski (SSBN-633),
Skate (SSN-578),
Sargo (SSN-583),
Francis Scott Key (SSBN-657),
Sturgeon (SSN-637),
Benjamin Franklin (SSBN-640),
Swordfish (SSN-579),
Seadragon (SSN-584),
Stonewall Jackson (SSBN-634),
Simon Bolivar (SSBN-641),
Hammerhead (SSN-663),
Mariano G. Vallejo (SSBN-658) ,
Tullibee (SSN-597),
Lewis & Clark (SSBN-644),
Pargo (SSN-650),
Seahorse (SSN-669),
Gurnard (SSN-662),
Flying Fish (SSN-673),
Gato (SSN-615),
Puffer (SSN-652),
Seawolf (SSN-575),
Baton Rouge (SSN-689),
Bergall (SSN-667),
Whale (SSN-638),
Henry Clay (SSBN-625),
James Madison (SSBN-627),
Finback (SSN-670),
Spadefish (SSN-668),
Sunfish (SSN-649),
George Bancroft (SSBN-643),
Grayling (SSN-646),
Pintado (SSN-672),
Tunny (SSN-682),
Archerfish (SSN-678),
& Woodrow Wilson (SSBN-624).
USN photo & partial text courtesy of home.flash.net/~tomj/tunny/chop/rx. & submitted by Jack Treutle.

View the Queenfish (SSN-651)
DANFS history entry located on the Haze Gray & Underway Web Site.
Crew Contact And Reunion Information
U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation
Fleet Reserve Association

Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
USS Queenfish SS393/SSN651

Back To The Main Photo IndexBack To the Submarine Index
Problems and site related matters, E-mail Webmaster
This page is created by Gary Priolo and maintained by Michael Mohl
1996 - 2014, NavSource History All rights reserved.