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NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Patch contributed by Mike Smolinski

Virginia (SSN-774)

Radio Call Sign: November - Victor - India - Romeo

Virginia Attack Submarine: The contract to build her was awarded to the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics Corporation in Groton, Connecticut on 30 September 1998 and her keel was laid down on 2 September 1999.
Commissioned USS Virginia (SSN-774) 23 October 2004.

Specifications:Power Plant: One S9G pressurized water reactor, 29.84MW (40,000hp), one shaft with pumpjet propulsor, Improved Performance Machinery Program Phase III one secondary propulsion submerged motor. Displacement, 7,800 tons submerged. Length: 377 feet. Draft: 32 feet. Beam: 34 feet. Speed: 25+ knots submerged. Depth: Greater than 800 feet. Horizontal Tubes: Four 21" Torpedo Tubes, Vertical Tubes: 12 Vertical Launch System Tubes, Weapons: 38 weapons, including: Vertical Launch System Tomahawk Cruise Missiles, Mk 48 ADCAP Heavyweight Torpedoes, Advanced Mobile Mines, Unmanned Undersea Vehicles, Special Warfare: Dry Deck Shelter. Advanced SEAL Delivery System. Sonars: Spherical active/passive arrays. Light Weight Wide Aperture Arrays. TB-16, TB-29, and future towed arrays. High-frequency chin and sail arrays. Countermeasures: 1 internal launcher (reloadable 2-barrel) 14 external launchers. Crew: 113 officers and men.


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Virginia-class1.09kNewport News Shipbuilding is teamed with General Dynamics Electric Boat to build Virginia-class submarines. Newport News Shipbuilding builds the stern, habitability & machinery spaces, torpedo room, sail and bow. Electric Boat builds the pressure hull, engine room and control room. Newport News Shipbuilding and Electric Boat each perform work on the reactor plant as well as alternate on the final assembly, test, outfit and delivery. The team has been recognized as the best shipbuilding program in the Navy.
Virginia-class Infographic PDF.
Text & photo courtesy of huntingtoningalls.com.
Photo added 10/13/15.
Virginia77kRhode Island senator Jack Reed addresses the large audience gathered to observe the keel laying ceremony for the Navy's first Virginia class attack submarine, Virginia (SSN-774) at North Kingstown, R.I., 2 September 1999. Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics and Newport News Shipbuilding have combined their efforts in the construction of two new attack submarines, Virginia and Texas (SSN-775) to be delivered to the Navy in 2004 and 2005 respectively. Also participating were Virginia senators John Warner and Charles Robb. USN photo # N-3917-001, by Journalist 1st Class Joseph W. Gunder III, courtesy of CHINFO Chief of Naval Information.
Virginia15k Commemorative postal cover marking the keel laying of the Virginia (SSN-774). Photo courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Virginia100k Virginia (SSN-774) module under construction, 27 April 2000.Photo by Chris Oxley, courtesy of General Dynamics Electric Boat.
Virginia Class886k A cut out of the Virginia class submarine characteristics Block III: The Changes.
The most obvious change is the switch from 12 vertical launch tubes, to 12 missiles in 2 tubes that use technology from the Ohio Class special forces/ strike SSGN program. The Virginia’s hull has a smaller cross-section than the converted ballistic missile SSGNs, so the “6-shooters” will be shorter and a bit wider. Nevertheless, they will share a great deal of common technology, allowing innovations on either platform to be incorporated into the other submarine class during major maintenance milestones. Net savings are about $8 million to program baseline costs.
The other big change you can see in the above diagram is switching from an air-backed sonar sphere to a water-backed Large Aperture Bow (LAB) array. Eliminating the hundreds of SUBSAFE penetrations that help maintain required pressure in the air-backed sonar sphere will save approximately $11 million per hull, and begins with the FY 2012 boats (SSNs 787-788).
The LAB Array has 2 primary components: the passive array, which will provide improved performance, and a medium-frequency active array. It utilizes transducers from the SSN-21 Seawolf Class that are that are designed to last the life of the hull. This is rather par for the course, as the Virginia Class was created in the 1990s to incorporate key elements of the $4 billion Seawolf Class submarine technologies into a cheaper boat.
The SUBSAFE eliminations, plus the life-of-the-hull transducers, will help to reduce the submarines’ life cycle costs as well by removing moving parts that require maintenance, eliminating possible points of failure and repair, and removing the need for transducer replacements in drydock.
The bow redesign is not limited to these changes, however, and includes 25 associated redesign efforts. These are estimated to reduce construction costs by another $20 million per hull beginning with the FY 2012 submarine.
With the $19 million ($11 + 8) from the LAB array and Vertical Payload, and the $20 million from the associated changes, General Dynamics is $39 million toward the $200 million baseline costs goal of “2 for 4 in 12”. While the changes themselves will begin with the FY 2009 ship, the savings are targeted at FY 2012 because of the learning curve required as part of the switch. Recent discussions concerning an earlier shift to 2 submarines per year would result in faster production of the Block III submarines, but would be unlikely to make a huge difference to that learning curve.
Photo & text courtesy of defenseindustrydaily.com.
Virginia73k Aft Section Transport of the Virginia (SSN-774), photographed on 29/01/2002. Photo by Jim Hemeon, courtesy of northropgrumman.com.
Virginia100kForward Section of the Virginia (SSN-774) on 4/8/2002. Photo by John Whalen, courtesy of northropgrumman.com.
Virginia125kThis conceptual drawing dated 21 May 2003 shows the new Virginia class attack submarine now under construction at General Dynamics Electric Boat in Groton, Conn., and Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News, Va. The first ship of this class, Virginia (SSN-774) is scheduled to be delivered to the U.S. Navy in 2004.U.S. D.O.D. graphic # D-9078S-001 by Ron Stern, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia41kVirginia (SSN-774),(underwater artist conception) w/missle and divers.Courtesy of General Dynamics Corp. web page.
Virginia37kVirginia (SSN-774), characteristics of the NSSN class.Courtesy of globalsecurity.org
Virginia22kVirginia (SSN-774), artists conception of different models and characteristics of the NSSN class. Courtesy of globalsecurity.org
Virginia63k Virginia (SSN-774) schematics.Courtesy of globalsecurity.org
Virginia29k Virginia (SSN-774) sail/antenna baseline configuration.Courtesy of globalsecurity.org
Virginia11kVirginia (SSN-774), artists conception of different models and characteristics of the NSSN class.Courtesy of globalsecurity.org
Virginia20kVirginia (SSN-774), artists conception of different models and characteristics of the NSSN class. Courtesy of globalsecurity.org
Virginia37kVirginia (SSN-774), artists conception of different models and characteristics of the NSSN class.Courtesy of globalsecurity.org
Virginia78kVirginia (SSN-774), underway, artists conception of an advanced sail for this class.Courtesy of Richard Strangman and globalsecurity.org
Virginia60kVirginia (SSN-774), being hauled out of assembly.Courtesy of by Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia64kVirginia (SSN-774), bow view.Courtesy of by Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia81kVirginia (SSN-774), starboard side view.Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia74kVirginia (SSN-774), portside view with the propeller wrapper in some sort of a protective caseing to prevent damage prior to launching.Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia95kVirginia (SSN-774), dolly and support system to aid in lauching.Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia90kVirginia (SSN-774), close up view of the dolly. Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia74kVirginia (SSN-774), being slid into position for launching. Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia84kVirginia (SSN-774), being slid into position for launching. Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia96kVirginia (SSN-774), bow connections secured and ready to lower. Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia173kVirginia (SSN-774), lowered down and scaffolding erected, port view .Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia108kVirginia (SSN-774), port view with gangplank attached. Note the sonar section for another boat inside the hanger, the Jimmy Carter (SSN-23). Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia249kHigh-angle view of the US Navy New Attack Submarine Pre-Commissioning Unit Virginia (SSN-774), under construction inside the Electric Boat Corporation of Connecticut facility, located at Groton Shipyard, Connecticut on 15 April 2004. Official USN photo # DN-SD-05-02487, by General Dynamics Electric Boat, from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection, courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil. & submitted by Bill Gonyo.
Virginia247kThe Navy's newest and most advanced submarine, Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Virginia (SSN-774) moved out doors at Groton, Conn. 5 August 2003 for the first time in preparation for her 16 August christening. Photo # O-0000X-001 provided courtesy General Dynamics Photo / Electric Boat., courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia147k The Navy's newest and most advanced submarine, Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Virginia (SSN-774) moved out doors at Groton, Conn. 5 August 2003 for the first time in preparation for her 16 August christening. Photo # O-0000X-003 provided courtesy General Dynamics Photo / Electric Boat., courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia218k The nuclear-powered attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774), in drydock as it starts to flood, 5 August 2003. USN photo courtesy of sublant.navy.mil.
Virginia314k The first of the Virginia class submarines, Virginia (SSN-774) was christened 16 August at General Dynamics Electric Boat in Groton, Conn. About 7,500 people attended. The Virginia will be delivered to the Navy in spring 2004. Courtesy of General Dynamics Electric Boat.
Virginia333kCapt. David Kern, prospective commanding officer of the Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Virginia (SSN-774), and Lynda Johnson Robb, the boat's sponsor, pose for a photo with the pre-commissioning crew standing behind them at Groton, Conn. on 15 August 2003. Virginia, the newest and most advanced nuclear attack submarine is scheduled for a mid-2004 delivery to the U.S. Navy. Robb is the daughter of former President Lyndon B. Johnson and Lady Bird Johnson. Photo # N-0000X-001 provided courtesy General Dynamics, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia231kLynda Johnson Robb christens the Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Virginia (SSN-774), the newest and most advanced nuclear attack submarine, at General Dynamics Electric Boat shipyard at Groton, Conn. on 15 August 2003. Standing with Robb, the daughter of former President Lyndon B. Johnson and Lady Bird Johnson, are, from left, Electric Boat President Michael W. Toner, U.S. Rep. Rob Simmons, R-Conn., Maid of Honor Jennifer Robb, the sponsor's daughter, and U.S. Sen. George Allen, R-Va., the event's principal speaker. With a length of 377 feet, a beam of 34 feet and a displacement of 7,800 tons, the Virginia is the first U.S. submarine designed to satisfy the requirements of regional and near-land missions in the post-Cold War era. The submarine is scheduled for a mid-2004 delivery to the U.S. Navy. Photo # O-0000X-001 provided courtesy General Dynamics, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia100kThe first of the Virginia class submarines, Virginia (SSN-774) whose christening was marked by the smash of a champagne bottle by ship sponsor Lynda Johnson Robb.Courtesy of General Dynamics Electric Boat.
Virginia34kPossible torpedo rounds being considered for the Virginia class include the Raytheon lightweight Hybrids Mk 50, Mk 46 Mod 5A(S), Mk 46 Mod 5A(SW) as well as the Mk 46 Mod 8.Courtesy of naval-technology.com
Virginia249kHigh-angle view of the US Navy New Attack Submarine Pre-Commissioning Unit Virginia (SSN-774), under construction inside the Electric Boat Corporation of Connecticut facility, located at Groton Shipyard, Connecticut on 15 April 2004. Official USN photo # DN-SD-05-02487, by General Dynamics Electric Boat, from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection, courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil. & submitted by Bill Gonyo.
Virginia272kTugboats C-Tractor 6 and Paul A. Wronowski assigned to Thames Towing in New London, Conn., ease PCU Virginia (SSN-774) into its berth at General Dynamics Electric Boat Shipyard in Groton, Conn, 30 July 2004. Virginia returned to Electric Boat following three days of sea trials. USN photo # N-0247F-003 by Photographer's Mate 3rd Class Steven Feller, provided courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia607kThe nuclear-powered attack submarine and the lead ship of its class, PCU Virginia (SSN-774) returns to the General Dynamics Electric Boat shipyard July 30, 2004, following the successful completion of its first voyage in open seas called "alpha" sea trials. Virginia is the Navy's only major combatant ready to join the fleet that was designed with the post-Cold War security environment in mind and embodies the war fighting and operational capabilities required to dominate the littorals while maintaining undersea dominance in the open ocean. Virginia and the rest of the ships of its class are designed specifically to incorporate emergent technologies that will provide new capabilities to meet new threats. Virginia will be delivered to the U.S. Navy this fall. USN photo # N-1234E-002 by General Dynamics Electric Boat, provided courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia465kStarboard view of the Virginia (SSN-774) returning to the General Dynamics Electric Boat shipyard 30 July 2004, following the successful completion of its first voyage in open seas called "alpha" sea trials. USN photo # N-1234E-001 by General Dynamics Electric Boat, provided courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia280k Machinist's Mate 1st Class James Guild and Machinist's Mate 1st Class Derrick Jones, both assigned to the Auxiliary Division aboard Virginia (SSN-774), operate the submarine's new V-12 diesel engine during Bravo trials on 21 August 2004.USN photo # N-2653P-003, by Journalist 1st Class James Pinsky,courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia350kGeneral Dynamics Electric Boat test engineers, Glen Colechia, Jason Hartle, and Matt Derosier place a Submarine Escape Immersion Equipment (SEIE) test mannequin in the lock-out truck aboard Virginia (SSN-774) for a fully instrumented trunk test which simulates an escape cycle to ensure survivable operation during Bravo trials, 21 August 2004. USN photo # N-2653P-018, by Journalist 1st Class James Pinsky, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia289kInstrument mannequins dressed out in Submarine Escape Immersion Equipment (SEIE), inside the engine room logistics escape trunk, await the start of Electric Boat's Fully Instrumented Trunk Test aboard Virginia (SSN-774). Virginia's SEIE system is designed to facilitate safe escapes from as deep as 600 feet. USN photo # N-2653P-001, by Journalist 1st Class James Pinsky, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia310kMachinist's Mate 1st Class James Guild and Machinist's Mate 1st Class Derrick Jones, both assigned to the Auxiliary Division aboard Virginia (SSN-774), operate the submarine's new V-12 diesel engine during Bravo trials. USN photo # N-2653P-012, by Journalist 1st Class James Pinsky, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia276k Chief Electronics Technician Jerry Allan Bolte, co-pilot, and Senior Chief Machinist's Mate Scott McIntire, pilot, operate the ship's control panel aboard the attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774) on 22 August 2004. Unlike submarines before it, Virginia eliminates the traditional helmsman, planesman, chief of the watch and diving officer of the watch stations by combining all of them into two watch stations manned by E-6 and above personnel. USN photo # N-2653P-209, by Journalist 1st Class James Pinsky, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia304kAtlantic Ocean, 22 August 2004, Virginia (SSN-774) has one of the most advanced torpedo delivery systems in the fleet. In addition to torpedoes, the Virginia-class will be armed with Tomahawk cruise missiles and has been designed to host the Advanced SEAL Delivery System (ASDS) and Dry-Deck Shelter to support various missions. USN photo # N-2653P-370, by Journalist 1st Class James Pinsky,courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia118k Fire Control Technician 1st Class Patrick Nogalski monitors the attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774) radar screens during a surface transit off the coast of Virginia after successfully completing Bravo Trials.USN photo # N-2653P-001, by Journalist 1st Class James Pinsky, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia525k One of Virginia (SSN-774) new components is it's diesel generator, a Caterpillar 3512B V-12 Twin-turbo charged engine. All of the engine's readings are visible on a liquid crystal display (LCD) panel.USN photo # N-2653P-344, by Journalist 1st Class James Pinsky,courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia310k Machinist's Mate 2nd Class Michael Foster, wipes his face after a long day of Bravo Trials while waiting for Machinist's Mate 3rd Class Steven Savoie to finish his laundry aboard Virginia (SSN-774), 22 August 2004.USN photo # N-2653P-357, by Journalist 1st Class James Pinsky,courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia225kGeneral Dynamics Electric Boat test engineers rest in modified berthing facilities located in the Torpedo Room aboard Virginia (SSN-774) during Bravo trials, 22 August 2004. The torpedo room can be reconfigured to meet a variety of operational missions including bunking a special operations team. USN photo # N-2653P-274, by Journalist 1st Class James Pinsky, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia224kElectric Boat employee Ed Robinson works with Sonar Technician 2nd Class John Parcewl, center, and Senior Chief Sonar Technician James Walker, foreground, as they deploy a TB-16 towed sonar array from Virginia (SSN-774).USN photo # N-2653P-987, by Journalist 1st Class James Pinsky, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia226kA crew member aboard Virginia (SSN-774), makes his way to the engine room through the forward compartment upper level passageway. The dim lighting helps Sailors sleep in the berthing units located on either side of the forward compartment upper level passageway. USN photo # N-2653P-387, by Journalist 1st Class James Pinsky, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia277kMachinist Mate 3rd Class Steven Savoie studies ships qualifications during Bravo Trials aboard Virginia (SSN-774). Virginia has a goal of being a paperless submarine. All of the boat's logs, manuals, and qualifications are kept on laptops, or PDA's.USN photo # N-2653P-017, by Journalist 1st Class James Pinsky, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia147kThe sun begins to set on 24 August 2004 as the attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774) heads into port at Norfolk Naval Shipyard after successfully completing her Bravo Trials. USN photo # N-2653P-003, by Journalist 1st Class James Pinsky, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia173k The nuclear-powered attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774) passes the skyline of Portsmouth, Va., 25 August 2004 on its the way to Norfolk Naval Shipyard upon completion of Bravo sea trials. USN photo # N-5268S-002, by Journalist 2nd Class Christina M. Shaw, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia252kThe nuclear-powered attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774) passes the skyline of Portsmouth, Va., 25 August 2004 on its the way to Norfolk Naval Shipyard upon completion of Bravo sea trials. USN photo # N-5268S-008, by Journalist 2nd Class Christina M. Shaw, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia319kThe nuclear-powered attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774) passes the skyline of Portsmouth, Va., 25 August 2004 on its the way to Norfolk Naval Shipyard upon completion of Bravo sea trials. USN photo # N-5268S-005, by Journalist 2nd Class Christina M. Shaw, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia157k Sonar Officer, Lt. j.g. Andrew Waldman, utilizes the infra-red function on the photonics display aboard the attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774) on 25 August 2004 while underway in the Atlantic Ocean. USN photo # N-2653P-040, by Journalist 1st Class James Pinsky, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Hampton350kThe Los Angeles-class attack submarine Hampton (SSN-767) left, passes the Navy's newest attack submarine, Virginia (SSN-774) at the mouth of the Chesapeake Bay, 4 October 2004. Virginia will be commissioned at Naval Station Norfolk, Va., on 22 October 2004.
USN photo # N-5268S-001 by Journalist 2nd Class Christina M. Shaw, courtesy of chinfo.navy.mil web site.
Virginia242kThe Precommissioning Unit (PCU) Virginia (SSN-774), with the help of the Tugboats C-Tractor 6 and Paul A. Wronowski assigned to Thames Towing in New London, Conn., arrived at Naval Submarine Base New London, 13 October 2004. USN photo by JO1 (SW/AW) Mark A. Savage, courtesy of csg2.mil. & provided by Bill Gonyo.
Virginia221k The Navy's newest attack submarine, Virginia (SSN-774), pulls into port at Naval Station Norfolk, Va., 18 October 2004, in preparation for her commissioning on 23 October 2004. USN photo # N-2820Z-002, by Journalist Seaman Andy Zask, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia247kThe Navy yard tractor tug Susan Moran (YTB) from Moran Towing of Virginia helps guide the Navy's newest attack submarine, Virginia(SSN-774), into port at Naval Station Norfolk, Va., 18 October 2004, in preparation for her commissioning on October 23, 2004. USN photo # N-2820Z-001, by Journalist Seaman Andy Zask, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia207kThe Navy yard tractor tug Susan Moran (YTB) from Moran Towing of Virginia helps guide the Navy's newest attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774) into port at Naval Station Norfolk, Va., 18 October 2004, in preparation for her commissioning on October 23, 2004. The boat ahead of the Virginia might be a Vanguard-class SSBN from the United Kingdom's Royal Navy. USN photo # N-2820Z-003, by Journalist Seaman Andy Zask, courtesy of news.navy.mil. Partial text courtesy of Eric Fjell.
Virginia272kThe crew of Virginia (SSN-774) man the ship during her commissioning ceremony at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. on 23 October 2004. Virginia will be homeported in Groton, Conn.USN photo # N-5268S-001, by Journalist 2nd Class Christina M. Shaw, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia205kMrs. Lynda Johnson Robb, the daughter of former President Lyndon Johnson and the sponsor of Virginia (SSN-774), announces to the crew to "man the ship, and bring her to life" at the commissioning ceremony of the newest class of fast attack submarines. USN photo # N-3527B-002, by Photographer's Mate Airman Timothy Bensken, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia200kA Sailor raises the Union Jack as Virginia (SSN-774) is placed in commission at Naval Station Norfolk, Va. USN photo # N-3527B-001, by Photographer's Mate Airman Timothy Bensken, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia324kSailors assigned to Virginia (SSN-774), man-the-rails as Capt. David J. Kern takes command and brings the boat to life during the commissioning ceremony.USN photo # N-2383B-160, by Chief Photographer's Mate Johnny Bivera, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia362kThe crew assigned to Virginia (SSN-774) bring her to life as they board the newly commissioned first nuclear-powered fast attack Virginia-class submarine. USN photo # N-2383B-150, by Chief Photographer's Mate Johnny Bivera, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia282kKeynote speaker Senator John Warner of Virginia, takes a moment to smile during the commissioning ceremony of Virginia (SSN-774).USN photo # N-2383B-109, by Chief Photographer's Mate Johnny Bivera, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia269k The many rates that make up the crew assigned to Virginia (SSN-774), stand at attention during its commissioning. USN photo # N-2383B-057, by Chief Photographer's Mate Johnny Bivera, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia302k Officers and crew assigned to Virginia (SSN-774), stand at attention during its commissioning. USN photo # N-2383B-008, by Chief Photographer's Mate Johnny Bivera, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia34kInvitation for the Commissioning ceremony for the Virginia (SSN-774), 23 October, 2004. Courtesy of Wendell R. McLaughlin Jr.
Virginia17kCommemorative postal cover marking the Virginia's (SSN-774) commissioning on 23 October, 2004. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Virginia16kCommemorative postal cover marking the Virginia's (SSN-774) commissioning on 23 October, 2004. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Virginia18kCommemorative postal cover marking the Virginia's (SSN-774) commissioning on 23 October, 2004. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Virginia227k Commanding Officer, Virginia (SSN-774), Cmdr. Todd Cramer, answers questions from local media about his submarine and its deployment. Virginia arrived home, 23 November 2005, to Submarine Base New London, Conn., after embarking on her maiden deployment in support of the Global War on Terrorism. USN photo # N-0653J-003, by Lt. Mark Jones, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia306k Friends and family members of Sailors assigned to the attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774), applaud as the submarine is moored to its pier. USN photo # N-0653J-001, by Lt. Mark Jones, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia122kSnow covers the hull of the fast attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774) as it sits moored to the pier at Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, Conn., on 2 February 2007. DoD photo # N-8467N-005 by John Narewski.
Connecticut 172k An aerial view of attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774), bottom, and fast attack submarine Connecticut (SSN-22), moored to the pier at Submarine Base New London on 2 February 2007. USN photo # N-8467N-001 by John Narewski, courtesy of navy.mil.
Virginia564kSailors aboard the attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774) stand damage control watch before the boat gets underway. Damage control is an integral part of life for a submariner. Along with their rate responsibilities, everyone is a fireman trained to combat fires and casualties.USN photo # N-3333H-008, by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jonathan W. Hutto, Sr, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia137k Hannah Kiefer, Miss Virginia 2007, gets to look out from the bridge aboard the attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774) on 3 June 2007 as Lt. Erik Maddock explains some of the boat's systems. USN photo # N-8467N-001, by John Narewski, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia94kSecretary of the Navy (SECNAV) The Honorable Dr. Donald C. Winter tours the fast-attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774) off the coast of Florida on 19 February 2009. USN photo # N-5549O-115, by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Kevin S. O'Brien, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia467k The attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774) pulls into Submarine Base New London 13 April 2010 after completing the first six-month deployment for a Virginia class Submarine. Virginia traveled more than 37,000 miles while conducting operations in the U.S. European and U.S. Central Command areas of responsibility.USN photo # N-8467N-003, by John Narewski, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia699kThe attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774) returns to Submarine Base New London 3 July 2014 after completing a 14-week surge deployment.U.S. Navy photo # 140703-N-TN558-030 by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jason J. Perry, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Photo added 10/13/15.

There is no DANFS History currently available for Virginia (SSN-774) at the Haze Gray & Underway Web Site, the main archive for the DANFS Online Project.
Crew Contact And Reunion Information
Not applicable to this ship.
Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
The VIRGINIA Class America's Next Submarine
The Virginia Class—A New Submarine for the 21st Century
SSN-774 Virginia class NSSN New Attack Submarine Centurion
NSSN VIRGINIA CLASS ATTACK SUBMARINE, USA

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