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NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Patch contributed by Mike Smolinski

Virginia (SSN-774)
Keel Laying to Launching

Radio Call Sign: November - Victor - India - Romeo

To Additional Pages

Shakedown Cruise
Commissioning
Active Service


Virginia Attack Submarine: The contract to build her was awarded to the Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics Corporation in Groton, Connecticut on 30 September 1998 and her keel was laid down on 2 September 1999.
Commissioned USS Virginia (SSN-774) 23 October 2004.

Specifications:Power Plant: One S9G pressurized water reactor, 29.84MW (40,000hp), one shaft with pumpjet propulsor, Improved Performance Machinery Program Phase III one secondary propulsion submerged motor. Displacement, 7,800 tons submerged. Length: 377 feet. Draft: 32 feet. Beam: 34 feet. Speed: 25+ knots submerged. Depth: Greater than 800 feet. Horizontal Tubes: Four 21" Torpedo Tubes, Vertical Tubes: 12 Vertical Launch System Tubes, Weapons: 38 weapons, including: Vertical Launch System Tomahawk Cruise Missiles, Mk 48 ADCAP Heavyweight Torpedoes, Advanced Mobile Mines, Unmanned Undersea Vehicles, Special Warfare: Dry Deck Shelter. Advanced SEAL Delivery System. Sonars: Spherical active/passive arrays. Light Weight Wide Aperture Arrays. TB-16, TB-29, and future towed arrays. High-frequency chin and sail arrays. Countermeasures: 1 internal launcher (reloadable 2-barrel) 14 external launchers. Crew: 113 officers and men.


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Virginia77k Rhode Island senator Jack Reed addresses the large audience gathered to observe the keel laying ceremony for the Navy's first Virginia class attack submarine, Virginia (SSN-774) at North Kingstown, R.I., 2 September 1999. Electric Boat Division of General Dynamics and Newport News Shipbuilding have combined their efforts in the construction of two new attack submarines, Virginia and Texas (SSN-775) to be delivered to the Navy in 2004 and 2005 respectively. Also participating were Virginia senators John Warner and Charles Robb. U.S. Navy photo # N-3917-001, by Journalist 1st Class Joseph W. Gunder III, courtesy of CHINFO Chief of Naval Information.
Virginia15k Commemorative postal cover marking the keel laying of the Virginia (SSN-774). Photo courtesy of Jack Treutle.
Virginia100k Virginia (SSN-774) module under construction, 27 April 2000.Photo by Chris Oxley, courtesy of General Dynamics Electric Boat.
Virginia Class886k A cut out of the Virginia class (SSN-774) submarine characteristics Block III: The Changes.
The most obvious change is the switch from 12 vertical launch tubes, to 12 missiles in 2 tubes that use technology from the Ohio Class special forces/ strike SSGN program. The Virginia’s hull has a smaller cross-section than the converted ballistic missile SSGNs, so the “6-shooters” will be shorter and a bit wider. Nevertheless, they will share a great deal of common technology, allowing innovations on either platform to be incorporated into the other submarine class during major maintenance milestones. Net savings are about $8 million to program baseline costs.
The other big change you can see in the above diagram is switching from an air-backed sonar sphere to a water-backed Large Aperture Bow (LAB) array. Eliminating the hundreds of SUBSAFE penetrations that help maintain required pressure in the air-backed sonar sphere will save approximately $11 million per hull, and begins with the FY 2012 boats (SSNs 787-788).
The LAB Array has 2 primary components: the passive array, which will provide improved performance, and a medium-frequency active array. It utilizes transducers from the SSN-21 Seawolf Class that are that are designed to last the life of the hull. This is rather par for the course, as the Virginia Class was created in the 1990s to incorporate key elements of the $4 billion Seawolf Class submarine technologies into a cheaper boat.
The SUBSAFE eliminations, plus the life-of-the-hull transducers, will help to reduce the submarines’ life cycle costs as well by removing moving parts that require maintenance, eliminating possible points of failure and repair, and removing the need for transducer replacements in drydock.
The bow redesign is not limited to these changes, however, and includes 25 associated redesign efforts. These are estimated to reduce construction costs by another $20 million per hull beginning with the FY 2012 submarine.
With the $19 million ($11 + 8) from the LAB array and Vertical Payload, and the $20 million from the associated changes, General Dynamics is $39 million toward the $200 million baseline costs goal of “2 for 4 in 12”. While the changes themselves will begin with the FY 2009 ship, the savings are targeted at FY 2012 because of the learning curve required as part of the switch. Recent discussions concerning an earlier shift to 2 submarines per year would result in faster production of the Block III submarines, but would be unlikely to make a huge difference to that learning curve.
Photo & text courtesy of defenseindustrydaily.com. Photo added 07/03/09.
Virginia73k Aft Section Transport of the Virginia (SSN-774), photographed on 29/01/2002. Photo by Jim Hemeon, courtesy of northropgrumman.com.
Virginia100kForward Section of the Virginia (SSN-774) on 4/8/2002. Photo by John Whalen, courtesy of northropgrumman.com.
Virginia125kThis conceptual drawing dated 21 May 2003 shows the new Virginia class attack submarine now under construction at General Dynamics Electric Boat in Groton, Conn., and Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipbuilding in Newport News, Va. The first ship of this class, Virginia (SSN-774) is scheduled to be delivered to the U.S. Navy in 2004.U.S. D.O.D. graphic # D-9078S-001 by Ron Stern, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia41kVirginia (SSN-774),(underwater artist conception) w/missle and divers.Courtesy of General Dynamics Corp. web page.
Virginia37kVirginia (SSN-774), characteristics of the NSSN class.Courtesy of globalsecurity.org
Virginia22kVirginia (SSN-774), artists conception of different models and characteristics of the NSSN class. Courtesy of globalsecurity.org
Virginia63k Virginia (SSN-774) schematics.Courtesy of globalsecurity.org
Virginia29k Virginia (SSN-774) sail/antenna baseline configuration.Courtesy of globalsecurity.org
Virginia11kVirginia (SSN-774), artists conception of different models and characteristics of the NSSN class.Courtesy of globalsecurity.org
Virginia20kVirginia (SSN-774), artists conception of different models and characteristics of the NSSN class. Courtesy of globalsecurity.org
Virginia37kVirginia (SSN-774), artists conception of different models and characteristics of the NSSN class.Courtesy of globalsecurity.org
Virginia78kVirginia (SSN-774), underway, artists conception of an advanced sail for this class.Courtesy of Richard Strangman and globalsecurity.org
Virginia60kVirginia (SSN-774), being hauled out of assembly.Courtesy of by Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia64kVirginia (SSN-774), bow view.Courtesy of by Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia81kVirginia (SSN-774), starboard side view.Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia74kVirginia (SSN-774), portside view with the propeller wrapper in some sort of a protective caseing to prevent damage prior to launching.Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia95kVirginia (SSN-774), dolly and support system to aid in lauching.Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia90kVirginia (SSN-774), close up view of the dolly. Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia74kVirginia (SSN-774), being slid into position for launching. Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia84kVirginia (SSN-774), being slid into position for launching. Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia96kVirginia (SSN-774), bow connections secured and ready to lower. Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia173kVirginia (SSN-774), lowered down and scaffolding erected, port view .Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia108kVirginia (SSN-774), port view with gangplank attached. Note the sonar section for another boat inside the hanger, the Jimmy Carter (SSN-23). Courtesy of Larry Bohn and Gary M. Kelch, Lieutenant, NR former crewmember of the Bergal SSN-667. Photo courtesy of SUPSHIP Groton.
Virginia247k The Navy's newest and most advanced submarine, Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Virginia (SSN-774) moved out doors at Groton, Conn. 5 August 2003 for the first time in preparation for her 16 August christening. Photo # O-0000X-001 provided courtesy General Dynamics Photo / Electric Boat., courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia147k The Navy's newest and most advanced submarine, Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Virginia (SSN-774) moved out doors at Groton, Conn. 5 August 2003 for the first time in preparation for her 16 August christening. Photo # O-0000X-003 provided courtesy General Dynamics Photo / Electric Boat., courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia218k The nuclear-powered attack submarine Virginia (SSN-774), in drydock as it starts to flood, 5 August 2003. U.S. Navy photo courtesy of sublant.navy.mil.
Virginia314k The first of the Virginia class submarines, Virginia (SSN-774) was christened 16 August at General Dynamics Electric Boat in Groton, Conn. About 7,500 people attended. The Virginia will be delivered to the Navy in spring 2004. Courtesy of General Dynamics Electric Boat.
Virginia333kCapt. David Kern, prospective commanding officer of the Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Virginia (SSN-774), and Lynda Johnson Robb, the boat's sponsor, pose for a photo with the pre-commissioning crew standing behind them at Groton, Conn. on 15 August 2003. Virginia, the newest and most advanced nuclear attack submarine is scheduled for a mid-2004 delivery to the U.S. Navy. Robb is the daughter of former President Lyndon B. Johnson and Lady Bird Johnson. Photo # N-0000X-001 provided courtesy General Dynamics, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia231kLynda Johnson Robb christens the Pre-Commissioning Unit (PCU) Virginia (SSN-774), the newest and most advanced nuclear attack submarine, at General Dynamics Electric Boat shipyard at Groton, Conn. on 15 August 2003. Standing with Robb, the daughter of former President Lyndon B. Johnson and Lady Bird Johnson, are, from left, Electric Boat President Michael W. Toner, U.S. Rep. Rob Simmons, R-Conn., Maid of Honor Jennifer Robb, the sponsor's daughter, and U.S. Sen. George Allen, R-Va., the event's principal speaker. With a length of 377 feet, a beam of 34 feet and a displacement of 7,800 tons, the Virginia is the first U.S. submarine designed to satisfy the requirements of regional and near-land missions in the post-Cold War era. The submarine is scheduled for a mid-2004 delivery to the U.S. Navy. Photo # O-0000X-001 provided courtesy General Dynamics, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
Virginia100k The first of the Virginia class submarines, Virginia (SSN-774) whose christening was marked by the smash of a champagne bottle by ship sponsor Lynda Johnson Robb.Courtesy of General Dynamics Electric Boat.
Virginia34k Possible torpedo rounds being considered for the Virginia class include the Raytheon lightweight Hybrids Mk 50, Mk 46 Mod 5A(S), Mk 46 Mod 5A(SW) as well as the Mk 46 Mod 8.Courtesy of naval-technology.com
Virginia249k High-angle view of the US Navy New Attack Submarine Pre-Commissioning Unit Virginia (SSN-774), under construction inside the Electric Boat Corporation of Connecticut facility, located at Groton Shipyard, Connecticut on 15 Apr 2004. Official U.S. Navy Photograph # DN-SD-05-02487, by General Dynamics Electric Boat, from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection, courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil. & submitted by Bill Gonyo.

There is no DANFS History currently available for Virginia (SSN-774) at the Haze Gray & Underway Web Site, the main archive for the DANFS Online Project.
Crew Contact And Reunion Information
Not applicable to this ship.
Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
The VIRGINIA Class America's Next Submarine
The Virginia Class—A New Submarine for the 21st Century
SSN-774 Virginia class NSSN New Attack Submarine Centurion
NSSN VIRGINIA CLASS ATTACK SUBMARINE, USA
Making a Submarine - General Dynamics
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©1996 - 2014, NavSource History All rights reserved.
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Problems and site related matters, E-mail Webmaster
This page is created and maintained by Michael Mohl
©1996 - 2014, NavSource History All rights reserved.