Please report any broken links or trouble you might come across to the Webmaster.
Please take a moment to let us know so that we can correct any problems and make your visit as enjoyable and as informative as possible.


NavSource Online: Submarine Photo Archive


Contributed by Mike Smolinski.

New Mexico (SSN-779)


Virginia Class Attack Submarine: Named USS New Mexico (SSN-779) 7 December 2004; Construction began in January 2004 at Electric Boat Corporation, Groton, Conn. Christened 13 Dec. 2008. Launched 18 January 2009. Commissioned 27 March 2010.

Specifications: Power Plant: One S9G pressurized water reactor, 29.84MW (40,000hp), one shaft with pumpjet propulsor, Improved Performance Machinery Program Phase III one secondary propulsion submerged motor. Displacement, 7,800 tons submerged. Length: 377 feet. Draft: 32 feet. Beam: 34 feet. Speed: 25+ knots submerged. Depth: Greater than 800 feet. Horizontal Tubes: Four 21" Torpedo Tubes, Vertical Tubes: 12 Vertical Launch System Tubes, Weapons: 38 weapons, including: Vertical Launch System Tomahawk Cruise Missiles, Mk 48 ADCAP Heavyweight Torpedoes, Advanced Mobile Mines, Unmanned Undersea Vehicles, Special Warfare: Dry Deck Shelter. Advanced SEAL Delivery System. Sonars: Spherical active/passive arrays. Light Weight Wide Aperture Arrays. TB-16, TB-29, and future towed arrays. High-frequency chin and sail arrays. Countermeasures: 1 internal launcher (reloadable 2-barrel) 14 external launchers. Crew: 113 officers and men.


Click On Image
For Full Size Image
SizeImage DescriptionContributed By/
Source
New Mexico94kWelder Rick Romyns begins work on a VLS (Vertical Launch System)tube for the New Mexico (SSN-779), June 2005. Photo courtesy of Electric Boat News, June 2005.
SECNAV380kQuonset Point, RI., 19 Jan. 2006, Electric Boat, Quonset Point employee, shows Secretary of the Navy (SECNAV), the Honorable, Dr. Donald C. Winter a piece of sheet metal he is fabricating for use aboard one of the new U.S. Navy Submarines being built by Electric Boat. SECNAV is in the northeast for a tour to familiarize himself with the construction, operation and maintenance of the U.S. Navy's Submarine Fleet. U.S. Navy photo # N-2568S-171 by Chief Journalist Craig P. Strawser, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
New Mexico72kCmdr. Robert Dain, a native of New Mexico, is set become the first commanding officer of his state's namesake submarine, New Mexico (SSN-779). Dain detached 24 March 2006 as Submarine Squadron Seven's deputy commander for Readiness to begin the Submarine Command Course prior to assuming command of New Mexico's pre-commissioning unit in August. U.S. Navy photo by JO2 Corwin Colbert, COMSUBPAC Public Affairs, courtesy of csp.navy.mil.
New Mexico62kAt present, New Mexico (SSN-779) is nearing 40% complete. Assembly is taking place inside NGNN’s 10-story Module Outfitting Facility (MOF) with New Mexico's bow pointed towards the James River near the mouth of Chesapeake Bay. In the MOF, hull sections are end-loaded with system modules which are powered up and tested before hull sections are welded together. Pictured here is the New Mexico state flag which is dwarfed by the 60-ft length of this cylindrical hull section. The forward direction is on the left side. This is section 7 which houses the forward portion of the engine room and the aft portion of the reactor compartment. New Mexico's reactor will power the submarine for its entire 33-year design service life without refueling. In this photo, section 7 is resting in Bay #3 but it will eventually be moved laterally and take its rightful position in New Mexico.Photo courtesy of Northrop Grumman Newport News Corporation & text courtesy of ussnewmexico.net.
New Mexico413kBefore tapered sections of the hull reach the MOF, they are fabricated in the Ring Assembly Building. Pictured here are two forward hull sections. Section 1A (on the right) is outside the pressure hull and houses the forward ballast tanks and 12 vertical tubes for launching cruise missiles. Section 1B (on the left) will be connected to 1A and contains the forward end of the pressure hull. The area with shiny buffed steel is where the sail will be attached. New Mexico's (SSN-779) sail is also under construction in the Ring Assembly Building. The bow dome, housing a spherical sonar array, will complete the forward end of the submarine. Photo # DCS05-610-5 by John Whalen, courtesy of nn.northropgrumman.com / Northrop Grumman. Text courtesy of ussnewmexico.net.
New Mexico72kConstruction of the New Mexico (SSN-779) at Newport News.Photo # DCS07-118-02 by John Whalen, courtesy of nn.northropgrumman.com / Northrop Grumman.
New Mexico30k Another tapered hull section is the stern. Here section 9B is being raised vertically by the shipyard's giant crane for transport to the MOF. Shown in this photo are the aft ballast tank flood ports, special ports from which countermeasures are launched, dihedral (fin) connection points, temporary steel pads for resting on chocks and the receptacle for the rudder pin. At this time, sections 9A and 9B are welded together as one unit and are in their normal horizontal position at the far end of Bay #4 where machining for the propulsor (ultra-quiet propeller in a special housing) is currently in progress. The upper and lower sections of New Mexico's (SSN-779) rudder have already been installed. Photo courtesy of Northrop Grumman Newport News Corporation & text courtesy of ussnewmexico.net.
New Mexico714kPDF of New Mexico's (SSN-779) keel laying ceremony at Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding on 12 April 2009.
"The keel of a ship is its physical foundation. Yet the real foundation -- the spiritual foundation, if you will -- is laid by the men and women who take the raw material and craft it into a fighting warship," said Mike Petters, corporate vice president and president of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding.
"It's the shipbuilders who breathe life into the ship. With New Mexico -- these shipbuilders are men and women from Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding here at Newport News and General Dynamics Electric Boat -- two companies teamed together to provide the most quality-driven and efficient product to the Navy."
Photo courtesy of Northrop Grumman Newport News Corporation & text courtesy of northropgrumman.com.
New Mexico163kNewport News welder Kim Kerins welds ship sponsor Cindy Giambastiani's initials onto a metal plate during the New Mexico (SSN-779) submarine keel authentication ceremony at Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding in Newport News, Va. Photo by Rick Thompson, courtesy of Northrop Grumman Newport News Corporation.
New Mexico191kNew Mexico's (SSN-779) keel authentication ceremony participants included (from left) ship's sponsor Cindy Giambastiani; corporate vice president and president of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding Mike Petters; U.S. Rep. Robert C. "Bobby" Scott (D-Va.); Newport News welder Kim Kerins; U.S. Rep Robert Wittman, (R-Va.); and New Mexico's Prospective Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Robert Dain.Photo by John Whalen, courtesy of Northrop Grumman Newport News Corporation.
New Mexico131kDenise Peoples was among the New Mexico (SSN-779) shipbuilders and crew to sign a banner commemorating "pressure hull complete" on the Virginia-class submarine.Photo # 189-5659, courtesy of Northrop Grumman Newport News Corporation.
New Mexico172kFrank Chee Willetto, a World War II Navajo Code Talker, gives a Navajo blessing for the Virginia class fast-attack submarine New Mexico (SSN-779) on 12 April 2008 during the keel authentication ceremony at Northrop Grumman Newport News Shipyard. The keel authentication ceremony is a major milestone for the shipyard, showing the near completion of the submarine. US navy photo # N-7668G-043, by Electrician's Mate 2nd Class Xander Gamble, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
New Mexico606kNorthrop Grumman Shipbuilding reached an important construction milestone May 18 when it completed the final hull welds of the New Mexico (SSN-779).Photo # 189-5059, courtesy of Northrop Grumman Newport News Corporation.
New Mexico99kA section of the New Mexico (SSN-779) is ready to be transported by the Sea Shuttle to the assembly building. Photo # DCS08-355-3, courtesy of Northrop Grumman Newport News Corporation via Bill Gonyo.
New Mexico548kNorthrop Grumman christened the sixth submarine of the Virginia class, New Mexico (SSN-779), 13 Dec. 2008.Photo # 189-5693, courtesy of Northrop Grumman Newport News Corporation.
New Mexico342kThe ship's sponsor, Cindy Giambastiani, christens New Mexico (SSN-779). Also pictured are U.S. Rep. Heather Wilson; New Mexico's Prospective Commanding Officer, Cmdr. Mark A. Prokopius and Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding President Mike Petters.Photo # 189-5694, courtesy of Northrop Grumman Newport News Corporation.
New Mexico262kThe speakers' platform and part of the crowd after the christening and balloon drop. Photo courtesy of S. Dale Hargrave.
New Mexico266kNorthrop Grumman launched the submarine New Mexico (SSN-779) 18 Jan. at the company's Shipbuilding sector in Newport News, Va. Photo # 189-5818, by Chris Oxley courtesy of Northrop Grumman Newport News Corporation via Bill Gonyo.
New Mexico343kNorthrop Grumman launched the submarine New Mexico (SSN-779) 18 Jan. at the company's Shipbuilding sector in Newport News, Va. Photo # 189-5819, by John Whalen courtesy of Northrop Grumman Newport News Corporation Corporation via Bill Gonyo.
New Mexico432k Crewmembers of the New Mexico (SSN-779) enjoy a lunch of prime rib and lobster tail, in celebration of crew move aboard and the first meal prepared in the ship's galley. Photo # 189-6465, by John Whalen courtesy of Northrop Grumman Newport News Corporation Corporation via Bill Gonyo.
New Mexico355kThe New Mexico (SSN-779) returned to Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding sector in Newport News, Va. after completing the ship's first round of successful sea trials on 26 Nov. 2009. Photo # 7632, courtesy of Northrop Grumman Newport News Corporation Corporation.
New Mexico454kThe N.M. state & U.S. flags fly from the sail of the New Mexico (SSN-779) as the boat returned to Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding sector in Newport News, Va. after completing the ship's first round of successful sea trials on 26 Nov. 2009. Photo # 7633, courtesy of Northrop Grumman Newport News Corporation Corporation.
New Mexico385k An MH-60S Knighthawk from Helicopter Sea Combat Squadron (HSC) 9 flies alongside New Mexico (SSN-779) while George H.W. Bush (CVN-77) sails in the distance 3 March 2010.Photo # N-3885H-317, by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nicholas Hal, courtesy of navy.news.mil.
New Mexico290k The crew of the attack submarine Pre-Commissioning (PCU) New Mexico (SSN-779) stand in formation topside during a commissioning ceremony practice at Naval Station Norfolk on 25 March 2010. Photo # N-7705S-050, by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Todd A. Schaff, courtesy of navy.news.mil.
New Mexico346k The nuclear attack submarine New Mexico (SSN-779) moored pierside during the ship's commissioning ceremony, held aboard Naval Station Norfolk 27 Mar. 2010. New Mexico is the sixth Virginia-class submarine to be commissioned and will be homeported in Groton, Ct. Photo # N-3154P-044, by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Scott Pittman, courtesy of navy.news.mil.
New Mexico789kRetired Chief Warrant Officer, George Smith, departs the stage with other honored guests and speakers following the commissioning of New Mexico (SSN-779) aboard Naval Station Norfolk 27 Mar. Smith is a WWll veteran and former crew member of the former battleship New Mexico (BB 40). Photo # N-3154P-114, by Mass Communication Specialist Seaman Scott Pittman, courtesy of navy.news.mil.
New Mexico111kNew Mexico (SSN-779) christening poster.Poster courtesy of Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding via Bill Gonyo. Photo added 04/17/10/

There is no DANFS History currently available for New Mexico (SSN-779) at the Haze Gray & Underway Web Site, the main archive for the DANFS Online Project.
Crew Contact And Reunion Information
Not applicable to this ship.
Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
The VIRGINIA Class America's Next Submarine
The Virginia Class—A New Submarine for the 21st Century
SSN-774 Virginia-class NSSN New Attack Submarine Centurion
NSSN VIRGINIA CLASS ATTACK SUBMARINE, USA
HISTORIC SUBMARINE DOCUMENTARY AND TRAINING FILMS
Making a Submarine - General Dynamics
Back To The Main Photo IndexBack To the Submarine Index
Problems and site related matters, E-mail Webmaster
This page is created and maintained by Michael Mohl
© 2012, Michael Mohl © 2012, NavSource Naval History. All Rights Reserved.