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NavSource Online: Amphibious Photo Archive


Contributed by Mike Smolinski

USS Sumter (LST-1181)

International Radio Call Sign:
November - Zulu - Golf - Whiskey
NZGW
Awards, Citations and Campaign Ribbons



Precedence of awards is from top to bottom, left to right
Top Row - Navy Unit Commendation (3)
Second Row - Navy Meritorious Unit Commendation - Navy Battle "E" Ribbon (3) - Navy Expeditionary Medal (2-Lebanon)
Third Row - National Defense Service Medal - Vietnam Service Medal (2) - Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal



USS Sumter (LST-1181) was transferred to the Republic of China and renamed ROCS Chung Ping (LST-233)

LST-1179 Newport Class Tank Landing Ship:
  • Laid down, 14 November 1967, at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Philadelphia, PA.
  • Launched, 13 December 1969
  • Commissioned, USS Sumter (LST-1181), 20 June 1970, CDR. James C. Hayes in command
  • During the Vietnam War USS Sumter (LST-1181) participated in the following campaign:
    Vietnam War Campaigns
    Campaign and Dates Campaign and Dates
    Vietnamese Counteroffensive - Phase VII
    22 May to 18 June 1971
    19 to 21 June 1971
    Vietnamese Ceasefire
    27 April to 31 May 1972
    22 May to 18 June 1972
    11 to 14 July 1972
    1 August to 2 August 1972

  • Decommissioned, 30 September 1993, and leased to the Republic of China, renamed ROCS Chung Ping (LST-233)
  • Struck from the Naval Register and simultaneously sold to the Republic of China, 29 September 2000
  • Current Disposition, active in the Republic of China Navy
  • USS Sumter earned two campaign stars for Vietnam War service
    Specifications:
    Displacement 5,190 t.(lt), 8,550 t.(fl)
    Length 522' 3" (ovl)
    Beam 69' 9 1/2" (max)
    Draft
    max forward (fl) 13' 6"
    max aft (fl) 16' 3" 15'
    Speed 27 kts. max.
    Complement
    14 Officers
    15 CPO
    226 Other Enlisted
    Troop Accommodations
    18 Officers
    21 SNCO
    268 Other Enlisted
    Boats
    three 36' LCVPs
    one 36' LCPL
    Aircraft
    flight deck one spot
    Armament
    As Built
    two twin 3"/50 dual purpose gun mounts
    Upgraded
    two .25mm chain guns
    six .50 cal machine guns
    one 20mm Phalanx (CIWS)
    Propulsion
    six 16 cylinder Electro Motive Engines (EMD 645 E-5) diesel engines
    two shafts, three engines per shaft, shaft horsepower 15,000
    two controllable reversible pitch propellers, twin rudders
    Three EMD 12 Cylinder 645 E-2 Generator sets, 1200 KW
    one 800 hp variable thrust bowthruster

    Click On Image
    For Full Size Image
    Size Image Description Contributed
    By
    Sumter 23k
    Namesake
    Thomas Sumter, (born August 14, 1734, Hanover county, Virginia [U.S.]—died June 1, 1832, South Mount, South Carolina, U.S.), legislator and officer in the American Revolution, remembered for his leadership of troops against British forces in North and South Carolina, where he earned the sobriquet “the Carolina Gamecock.” Sumter served in the French and Indian War and later moved to South Carolina. After the fall of Charleston (1780) he escaped to North Carolina, where he became brigadier general of state troops. After successes over the British at Catawba and at Hanging Rock (Lancaster county), he was defeated the same year at Fishing Creek (Chester county). He defeated Mayor Wemyss at Fishdam Ford and repulsed Colonel Banastre Tarleton at Blackstock (both in Union county) in November 1780. After the war Sumter served in the U.S. House of Representatives (1789–93; 1797–1801) and in the U.S. Senate (1801–10). He was the last surviving general officer of the Revolution. Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor was named for him. Text from the Encyclopedia Britannica
    Bill Gonyo
    Sumter 90k USS Sumter (LST-1181) underway, date and location unknown, displaying some characteristic features of the Newport class, such as the tunnel through the superstructure (in this case, with a truck emerging), permitting the entire upper deck to be used for vehicles. When this photograph was taken, the ship still had two enclosed 3"/50s, but their directors had been landed (note the empty tubs forward of the mounts). Also visible is the bow ramp folded back on deck abaft the gallows used to deploy it.
    US Navy photo and text from "U.S. Amphibious Ships and Craft: An Illustrated Design History" by Norman Friedman.
    Robert Hurst
    Sumter 468k USS Sumter (LST-1181) underway, date and location unknown. Ed Zajkowski
    Sumter 36k USS Sumter (LST-1181) underway, date and location unknown. Adrian A. Anderson
    Sumter 20k USS Sumter (LST-1181) at anchor, date and location unknown. Adrian A. Anderson
    Sumter 50k USS Sumter (LST-1181) at anchor, date and location unknown. Adrian A. Anderson
    Sumter 33k USS Sumter (LST-1181) at anchor, date and location unknown. Adrian A Anderson
    Sumter 375k USS Sumter (LST-1181) at anchor off Rapallo (Genoa), Italy in 1981 Photo by Carlo Martinelli
    Sumter 53k USS Sumter (LST-1181) conducting amphibious exercises, date and location unknown. Adrian A Anderson
    Sumter 50k USS Sumter (LST-1181) conducting amphibious exercises, date and location unknown. Adrian A Anderson
    Sumter 88k USS Sumter (LST-1181) enters Miraflores Lock of the Panama Canal, date unknown.
    US Navy photo from "All Hands" magazine, December 1988.
    Joe Radigan MACM USN Ret.
    Sumter 49k USS Sumter (LST-1181) conducting amphibious exercises, date and location unknown. Adrian A Anderson
    Sumter 145k USS Sumter (LST-1181) underway, date and location unknown. LST Home Port web site
    Sumter 47k USS Sumter (LST-1181) underway, date and location unknown. LST Home Port web site
    Sumter 91k USS Sumter (LST-1181) underway, date and location unknown. Richard Leonhardt
    Sumter 80k USS Sumter (LST-1181) moored at Harborside, Norfolk, VA., date unknown. David LaPell
    Sumter 921k USS Sumter (LST-1181) underway, 29 June 1991, with elements of the 26th Marine Expeditionary Unit (26th MEU) embarked while enroute to a Mediterranean deployment.
    Defense Visual Information Center photo # DN-ST-91-11038, a US Navy photo by PH1 J. E. Westfall, now in the collections of the Defense Visual Information Center.
    Robert Hurst
    Manitowoc 15k Transfer ceremony of USS Sumter (LST-1181) and USS Manitowoc (LST-1180) from the US Navy to the Republic of China at NAB Little Creek, VA., 8 May 1997. LST Home Port web site

    USS Sumter (LST-1181)
    DANFS history entries located at the US Naval History and Heritage Command
    Sumter and Sumter (LST-1181)

    For more photos and information about USS Sumter see;
  • The USS LST Ship Memorial
  • LST Homeport
  • State LST Chapters
  • United States LST Association
  • Mobile Riverine Force Association
  • Commanding Officers

  • Crew Contact And Reunion Information
    U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation - Navy Log

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    Last Updated 17 January 2014