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NavSource Online: Battleship Photo Archive

BB-8 USS ALABAMA
1896 - 1906


To Additional Pages

1907 - 1914
1915 - 1924


Illinois Class Battleship: Displacement 11,565 Tons, Dimensions, 374' (oa) x 72' 3" x 25' (Max), Armament 4 x 13"/35 14 x 6"/40, 4 x 18" tt. Armor, 16" 1/2 Belt, 14" Turrets, 4 " Decks, 10" Conning Tower.Machinery, 10,000 IHP; 2 vertical, Inverted, triple expansion engines, 2 screws. Speed, 16 Knots, Crew 536.

Operational and Building Data: Laid down by Cramp, Philadelphia, on December 2, 1896. Launched May 18, 1898. Commissioned October 16, 1900, Decommissioned August 17, 1909, Recommissioned July 1, 1912, Decommissioned July 1, 1914, Recommissioned April 5, 1917, Decommissioned May 7, 1920. Transferred to War Department, September 15, 1921.
Fate: Used as Target by Army Air Corps, September 27, 1921, in Chesapeake Bay. Hulk sold for scrap, March 19, 1924.
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BB-8 Alabama 4.30k Uncle Sam's New Battleship,
THE ALABAMA (BB-8) NOW APPROACHING COMPLETION.

The Alabama as she will appear when completed.
Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN.
Photo from The Saint Paul Globe. (St.Paul. Minn.)1896-1905, 19 September 1897, Image 17, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama157k Model of the Alabama (BB-8) at Battleship Park, Mobile, Ala.Courtesy of Judson Phillips.
BB-8 Alabama 745k UNCLE SAM'S NEWEST BATTLESHIP.
The Alabama (BB-8), the new warship for the American navy, is rapidly approaching completion, and it is one of the finest, if not the finest that have risen from the ways in the big shipyards of the Cramps. This engine of destruction is one of four sister ships. The three others are the Kearsarge (BB-5), Kentucky (BB-6) and Illinois (BB-7), which are now well under way at the yards in Newport News. The Alabama is a battleship of the first class. She is 372 feet long by 70 fret in the beam and draws 23 feet of water. She has 11,500 tons displacement, or just 100 tons more than the Iowa (BB-4). The Alabama will have only two turrets and will be much less heavily armored in every way than the Iowa and the Massachusetts (BB-2) class of ships.
The Alabama will he the most powerful fighter in all the navy. The engines of the new ship are of the triple expansion type, working in separate water-tight compartments. The engines will develop a combined horse power of 10,000, which will drive the ship at a speed of sixteen knots an hour. Seven decks will rise one on the other. There are water bottom, platform deck, berth dock, protective deck, main deck, upper deck and bridge deck. There will be living quarters for 500 men with their officers.
Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL.
Photo from Chicago Eagle. (Chicago, Ill.) 1889-19??, 11 December 1897, Image 6, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 650k ANOTHER BATTLESHIP FOR THE AMERICAN NAVYImage and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo from The Salt Lake Herald. (Salt Lake City [Utah) 1870-1909, 18 April 1898, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 1.01k WORK ON ALABAMA (BB-8)
PUSHING TO COMPLETION ONE OF THE FINEST OF OUR WARSHIPS.
Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA.
Photo from Richmond Dispatch.(Richmond, Va.) 1884-1903, 15 May 1898, Image 16, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 1.14k THE ALABAMA (BB-8) AFLOAT
ANOTHER BATTLE-SHIP LAUNCHED AT THE CRAMP YARDS
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 18 May 1898, Image 3, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 796k THE NEW ALABAMA (BB-8) LAUNCHED.
The Big Battleship Has an Omen of Good Fortune-Christened by Miss Morgan With Native Alabama Wine-Same Number as Her Confederate Namesake.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC & University of North Texas; Denton, TX.
Photo from The Houston Daily Post. (Houston, Tex.) 1886-1903, 19 May 1898, Mailable Edition, Image 4, & The Evening Times. (Washington, D.C.) 1895-1902, 18 May 1898, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-51.27kOUR NEW BATTLESHIPS.
KEARSARGE (BB-5), KENTUCKY (BB-6), ILLINOIS (BB-7), ALABAMA (BB-8) & WISCONSIN (BB-9)
Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA.
Photo from Richmond Dispatch. (Richmond, Va.) 1884-1903, 26 June 1898, Image 11, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 3.07k BATTLESHIP ALABAMA (BB-8) READY FOR THE NAVY
New Fighting Craft to Go Out to Sea on Monday on the Builders' Trial Trip
Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside.
Photo from The San Francisco Call.(San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, 26 August 1899, Image 7, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 3.2.57k BATTLESHIP ALABAMA (BB-8) STARTS ON HER BUILDERS' TRIAL TRIP
Contractors Confident That the New Fighting Craft Will Come Up to the Requirements of the Specifications.
THE NEW ALABAMA AND HER PREDECESSORS.
Alabama is not a new name in the American naval register. In 1818 the keel was laid for a line-of-battle ship in the Portsmouth Navy Yard. After a time work was suspended, and only resumed in a desultory manner as the years went by. She was christened Alabama and was a sister ship to the Vermont, which had been completed at the Boston yard the year the Alabama was commenced. When the war of the Rebellion broke out in 1861, the name Alabama was changed to New Hampshire, and the work of the builders was rushed, so that the craft was completed and went into commission early in 1864. She never saw any active service, as when she was ready for sea the day of the sailing vessel had long passed by. She is at present in use by the New York Naval Reserve, and entered upon the register as "unserviceable."
The most infamous of the vessels bearing that name was the Confederate cruiser Alabama, which was sunk off Cherbourg, France, July 1864, by the Kearsarge, in command of Captain Winslow, after an action lasting sixty-five minutes.
The new Kearsarge (BB-5) is nearing completion at the Newport News yard, and at no distant day the Alabama and the Kearsarge may be seen in one fleet, both flying the stars and stripes and ready to engage a common foe.
Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside.
Photo from The San Francisco Call.(San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, 29 August 1899, Image 2, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-5730kKEARSARGE (BB-5) AND ALABAMA (BB-8) TO FIGURE IN A PEACE INCIDENT.
THESE FAMOUS OLD NAMES WILL BE LINKED TOGETHER IN A CHARMING SENTIMENT.
Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO.
Photo from The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, 20 May 1900, Magazine Section, Image 32, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 1.30k GIANT ALABAMA (BB-8) ARRIVES IN PORT
New Battleship Here to Be Put in Trim for Her Trial Test Trip Off Maine Coast
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Evening World. (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, 22 August 1900, Evening Edition, Image 5, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 2.67k THE ALABAMA (BB-8) IN DRYDOCK
CAPTAIN W. H. BROWNSON COMMANDER
BIG WARSHIP EXPECTED TO GIVE A GOOD ACCOUNT OF HERSELF
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 August 1900, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 856k SISTER SHIPS WERE ON THE ALABAMA'S (BB-8) MEASURED COURSE.Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO.
Photo from The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, 02 September 1900, Magazine Section, Image 36, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama108kMoored in port, June 1901. Note the large National Ensign, booms rigged out as propeller guards, and semaphore "paddles" on the mainmast.Photo # NH 57755, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama 52k BATTLESHIP ALABAMA (BB-8) THAT SUFFERED SERIOUS INJURY BY THE PREMATURE EXPLOSION OF A SHELL RECENTLY DURING TARGET PRACTICE. THE BIG GUNS. THE MAIN SUPERSTRUCTURE AND MAIN BATTERIES WERE DAMAGED, NECESSITATING EXTENSIVE REPAIRS TO THE VESSELImage and text provided by University of California, Riverside.
Photo courtesy of The San Francisco Call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, 18 November 1901, Image 4, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama104kUnderway at low speed, circa 1901.Photo # NH 73784, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama149kPhotograph taken during the early 1900s and reproduced on a contemporary color-tinted postal card.Photo # NH 57757-KN, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama318kStern view of the Alabama (BB-8), circa early 1900's. Photo from the collection of Raymond Strout, courtesy of Jonathan Eno.
BB-8 Alabama600kAlabama (BB-8) underway on a contemporary color-tinted postal card.Photo taken from Our Country in War by Murat Halstead (1898) via Robert Hurst.
BB-8 Alabama51kColor tinted print of the Alabama (BB-8) in port, circa 00's, before modernization of cage masts. USN photo courtesy of Jack Tretule.
BB-8 Alabama 543k Jealousy Rankles at Preference.
The proposed appointment of Commander Richard Wainwright to command the battleship Alabama (BB-8) is causing a strong undercurrent of dissatisfaction in naval circles. The Alabama is one of the largest battleships in the United States Navy and to be her commander is, therefore, considered one of the choice plums of the service. To give Wainwright this post it will be necessary to promote him to the rank of Captain. Naval men state that there are several existing captains whose claims to the post are much greater than that of Wainwright. President Roosevelt, however, is a great admirer of that officer and this explains the Navy Department's action as being "for the best interests of the service."
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI.
Photo from Evening Bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii) 1895-1912, 23 August 1902, Image 10, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 1.85k FORTS AND WARSHIPS READY FOR THE FRAY
Army Prepares to Prevent Invasion by the Approaching Hostile Fleets.
ONE OF THE LARGEST SHIPS {ALABAMA (BB-8)} ENGAGED IN THE PRESENT MANEUVERS OF THE ARMY AND NAVY AND THE TWO NOTED OFFICERS COMMANDING THE HOSTILE FLEETS
Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside.
Photo courtesy of The San Francisco Call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, 31 August 1902, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama119kCapt. Willard Herbert Brownson commanded of the battleship Alabama (BB-8) from 1902 to 1905. Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
Blazes Away 985k HOW OUR NAVAL GUNNERS BREAK RECORDS.
Their Marvelous Accuracy Only Attained by Constant Practice with Most Ingenious Mechanical Aids.
Champion crew of the Alabama's (BB-8) after turret.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 04 October 1903, Image 31, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama12.57kShip's Gunner and Gunner's Mates, 1903. Note the kitten and parrot mascots, and the comment written on the First Class Gunner's Mate at right.Photo # NH 57497, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama95kForward turret crew Gunner's Mates pose by the breech of one of the ship's 13"/35 guns, 1903. Note the ex-Apprentice marks (figure "8" knot badges) worn by two of these men.Photo # NH 57494, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama95kChampion guns crew with Lieutenant Lewis J. Clark, 1903. They are posed with a 13-inch shell, on the foredeck in front of the ship's forward 13"/35 gun turret.Photo # NH 57495.
BB-8 Alabama71kCrew members F. Petry (left) and W.M. Langridge (in gun) pose at the breech of one of the ship's 13"/35 guns, 1903. Note the "A" with figure "8" knot on Petry's shirt.Photo # NH 57496, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama94k The submarine Plunger (SS-02) hauled out of the water at a Navy yard, circa 1903-1905. Alabama (BB-8) is in the right background. Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Cahn, 1990. Photo # NH 102428, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama79kAlabama (BB-8) seen off New York in 1904. Photo courtesy of maritimequest.com & submitted by Bill Gonyo.
BB-8 Alabama61k Anchored off New York City, 1905. She is flying a rear admiral's flag at her mainmast peak. Photographed by C.C. Langill, New York. USNHC photo # NH 105551, from the collection of Warren Beltramini, donated by Beryl Beltramini, 2007.
BB-8 Alabama59kAlabama (BB-8) anchored off New York City, with several steam launches and other boats alongside, 1905. She is flying a rear admiral's flag at her mainmast peak. Photographed by C.C. Langill, New York. USNHC photo # NH 105573, from the collection of Warren Beltramini, donated by Beryl Beltramini, 2007.
BB-8 Alabama650kPost card of the Alabama (BB-8). Photo courtesy of SK/3 Tommy Trampp.
BB-8 Alabama 3.28k BATTLESHIPS IN CRASH
TWO RUN AGROUND
Alabama (BB-8) Rams Kentucky (BB-6) in Avoiding Stranded Kearsarge (BB-5) All Off.

While five of the big battleships of the North Atlantic squadron, under Rear Admiral Evans,were steaming out to sea yesterday, bound for Hampton Roads, the Kearsarge and the Kentucky went aground, about noon, off the northwest point of the East Bank, about a mile and a half south of Norton's Island and two miles east of West Bank Light. The Alabama, fourth in line, tore through the channel and struck the Kentucky on the starboard quarter with terrific force, tearing a hole in her own port bow and seriously damaging the Kentucky. The fleet was proceeding under reduced speed, probably not more than seven or eight knots, when the high wind and strong tide eddies played havoc with the Kentucky, forcing her to swing almost half a mile off the main channel.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.& University of California, Riverside.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 08 January 1906, Image 1, & The San Francisco Call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, Image 3 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 640k Battleships in Danger.
These three battleships figured in a remarkable naval accident in New York bay Jan 7. The Kentucky (BB-6) which ran aground and was rammed by the Alabama (BB-8) is in the picture at the upper left. The Alabama is in the upper right. At the lower left is the Kearsarge (BB-5) which also ran aground. The diagram in the lower right shows how the accidents occurred. It is drawn from a description furnished by Rear Admiral Davis.
Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo from The Spanish Fork Press. (Spanish Fork, Utah) 1902-current, 18 January 1906, Image 3, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
PDF added 09/21/12.

Additional Alabama Images
4 General Views Of Alabama From The Library Of Congress Server.

USS ALABAMA BB-8 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry
(Located On The Hazegray & Underway Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)

Crew Contact And Reunion Information
Not Applicable To This Ship
Additional Resources
Hazegray & Underway Battleship Pages By Andrew Toppan.
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