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NavSource Online: Battleship Photo Archive

BB-8 USS ALABAMA


Illinois Class Battleship: Displacement 11,565 Tons, Dimensions, 374' (oa) x 72' 3" x 25' (Max), Armament 4 x 13"/35 14 x 6"/40, 4 x 18" tt. Armor, 16" 1/2 Belt, 14" Turrets, 4 " Decks, 10" Conning Tower.Machinery, 10,000 IHP; 2 vertical, Inverted, triple expansion engines, 2 screws. Speed, 16 Knots, Crew 536.

Operational and Building Data: Laid down by Cramp, Philadelphia, on December 2, 1896. Launched May 18, 1898. Commissioned October 16, 1900, Decommissioned August 17, 1909, Recommissioned July 1, 1912, Decommissioned July 1, 1914, Recommissioned April 5, 1917, Decommissioned May 7, 1920. Transferred to War Department, September 15, 1921.
Fate: Used as Target by Army Air Corps, September 27, 1921, in Chesapeake Bay. Hulk sold for scrap, March 19, 1924.
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Keel Laying / Commissioning
1898 - 1900

BB-8 Alabama 4.30k Uncle Sam's New Battleship,
THE ALABAMA (BB-8) NOW APPROACHING COMPLETION.

The Alabama as she will appear when completed.
Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN.
Photo from The Saint Paul Globe. (St.Paul. Minn.)1896-1905, 19 September 1897, Image 17, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama157k Model of the Alabama (BB-8) at Battleship Park, Mobile, Ala.Courtesy of Judson Phillips.
BB-8 Alabama 745k UNCLE SAM'S NEWEST BATTLESHIP.
The Alabama (BB-8), the new warship for the American navy, is rapidly approaching completion, and it is one of the finest, if not the finest that have risen from the ways in the big shipyards of the Cramps. This engine of destruction is one of four sister ships. The three others are the Kearsarge (BB-5), Kentucky (BB-6) and Illinois (BB-7), which are now well under way at the yards in Newport News. The Alabama is a battleship of the first class. She is 372 feet long by 70 fret in the beam and draws 23 feet of water. She has 11,500 tons displacement, or just 100 tons more than the Iowa (BB-4). The Alabama will have only two turrets and will be much less heavily armored in every way than the Iowa and the Indiana class (BB-1 / 3) of ships.
The Alabama will he the most powerful fighter in all the navy. The engines of the new ship are of the triple expansion type, working in separate water-tight compartments. The engines will develop a combined horse power of 10,000, which will drive the ship at a speed of sixteen knots an hour. Seven decks will rise one on the other. There are water bottom, platform deck, berth dock, protective deck, main deck, upper deck and bridge deck. There will be living quarters for 500 men with their officers.
Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL.
Photo from Chicago Eagle. (Chicago, Ill.) 1889-19??, 11 December 1897, Image 6, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 650k ANOTHER BATTLESHIP FOR THE AMERICAN NAVYImage and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo from The Salt Lake Herald. (Salt Lake City [Utah) 1870-1909, 18 April 1898, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 1.01k WORK ON ALABAMA (BB-8)
PUSHING TO COMPLETION ONE OF THE FINEST OF OUR WARSHIPS.
Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA.
Photo from Richmond Dispatch.(Richmond, Va.) 1884-1903, 15 May 1898, Image 16, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 1.14k THE ALABAMA (BB-8) AFLOAT
ANOTHER BATTLE-SHIP LAUNCHED AT THE CRAMP YARDS
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 18 May 1898, Image 3, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 796k THE NEW ALABAMA (BB-8) LAUNCHED.
The Big Battleship Has an Omen of Good Fortune-Christened by Miss Morgan With Native Alabama Wine-Same Number as Her Confederate Namesake.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC & University of North Texas; Denton, TX.
Photo from The Houston Daily Post. (Houston, Tex.) 1886-1903, 19 May 1898, Mailable Edition, Image 4, & The Evening Times. (Washington, D.C.) 1895-1902, 18 May 1898, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Monitors677kOUR NAVY AS IT IS TODAY
1. Monadnock (BM-3) . 2. Petrel. 3. Puritan (BM-1) . 4. Concord. S.Wilmington. 6. Amphitrite (BM-2) . 7. Ajax. 8. Machfas. 9. Cincinnati. 10. Marbiehead. 1 1. Montgomery. 12. Minneapolis. 13. Kearsarge (BB-5). 14. Kentucky (BB-6). 15. Bancroft. 16. Dolphin. 17. Vesuvius. 18. Raleigh. 19. Indiana (BB-1). 20. Iowa (BB-4). 21. Olympia. 22. Terror (M-4). 23. Catskill . 24. Miantonomah (BM-5). 25. Gustine. 26. Yorktown. 27. Texas. 28. Helena. 29. Massachusetts (BB-2). 30. Columbia. 31. New Orleans, 32. San Francisco. 33. Canaonicus. 34. Camanche . 35. Monterey (BM-6). 36. Brooklyn. 37. Detroit 38. Atlanta. 39. Alabama (BB-8). 40. Albany. 41. Baltimore. 42. Chicago. 43. Newark, 44. Boston. 45. Charleston. 46. Oregon (BB-3). 47. New York. 48. Manhattan. 49. Philadelphia. 50. Lehigh. And Torpedo Boats. Drawn by "w. A. Verhas.
Image and text provided by University of Tennessee.
Photo by The Maryville Times. (Maryville, Tenn.) 1884-1944, 28 May 1898, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov
BB-51.27kOUR NEW BATTLESHIPS.
KEARSARGE (BB-5), KENTUCKY (BB-6), ILLINOIS (BB-7), ALABAMA (BB-8) & WISCONSIN (BB-9)
Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA.
Photo from Richmond Dispatch. (Richmond, Va.) 1884-1903, 26 June 1898, Image 11, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 3.07k BATTLESHIP ALABAMA (BB-8) READY FOR THE NAVY
New Fighting Craft to Go Out to Sea on Monday on the Builders' Trial Trip
Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside.
Photo from The San Francisco Call.(San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, 26 August 1899, Image 7, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 3.2.57k BATTLESHIP ALABAMA (BB-8) STARTS ON HER BUILDERS' TRIAL TRIP
Contractors Confident That the New Fighting Craft Will Come Up to the Requirements of the Specifications.
THE NEW ALABAMA AND HER PREDECESSORS.
Alabama is not a new name in the American naval register. In 1818 the keel was laid for a line-of-battle ship in the Portsmouth Navy Yard. After a time work was suspended, and only resumed in a desultory manner as the years went by. She was christened Alabama and was a sister ship to the Vermont, which had been completed at the Boston yard the year the Alabama was commenced. When the war of the Rebellion broke out in 1861, the name Alabama was changed to New Hampshire, and the work of the builders was rushed, so that the craft was completed and went into commission early in 1864. She never saw any active service, as when she was ready for sea the day of the sailing vessel had long passed by. She is at present in use by the New York Naval Reserve, and entered upon the register as "unserviceable."
The most infamous of the vessels bearing that name was the Confederate cruiser Alabama, which was sunk off Cherbourg, France, July 1864, by the Kearsarge, in command of Captain Winslow, after an action lasting sixty-five minutes.
The new Kearsarge (BB-5) is nearing completion at the Newport News yard, and at no distant day the Alabama and the Kearsarge may be seen in one fleet, both flying the stars and stripes and ready to engage a common foe.
Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside.
Photo from The San Francisco Call.(San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, 29 August 1899, Image 2, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
1900's
BB-5730kKEARSARGE (BB-5) AND ALABAMA (BB-8) TO FIGURE IN A PEACE INCIDENT.
THESE FAMOUS OLD NAMES WILL BE LINKED TOGETHER IN A CHARMING SENTIMENT.
Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO.
Photo from The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, 20 May 1900, Magazine Section, Image 32, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 2.59k GIANT ALABAMA (BB-8) ARRIVES IN PORT
New Battleship Here to Be Put in Trim for Her Trial Test Trip Off Maine Coast
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Evening World. (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, 22 August 1900, Evening Edition, Image 5, &New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 23 August 1900, Image 1 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 2.67k THE ALABAMA (BB-8) IN DRYDOCK
CAPTAIN W. H. BROWNSON COMMANDER
BIG WARSHIP EXPECTED TO GIVE A GOOD ACCOUNT OF HERSELF
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 August 1900, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 856k SISTER SHIPS WERE ON THE ALABAMA'S (BB-8) MEASURED COURSE.Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO.
Photo from The St. Louis Republic. (St. Louis, Mo.) 1888-1919, 02 September 1900, Magazine Section, Image 36, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama108kMoored in port, June 1901. Note the large National Ensign, booms rigged out as propeller guards, and semaphore "paddles" on the mainmast.Photo # NH 57755, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama 52k BATTLESHIP ALABAMA (BB-8) THAT SUFFERED SERIOUS INJURY BY THE PREMATURE EXPLOSION OF A SHELL RECENTLY DURING TARGET PRACTICE. THE BIG GUNS. THE MAIN SUPERSTRUCTURE AND MAIN BATTERIES WERE DAMAGED, NECESSITATING EXTENSIVE REPAIRS TO THE VESSELImage and text provided by University of California, Riverside.
Photo courtesy of The San Francisco Call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, 18 November 1901, Image 4, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama104kUnderway at low speed, circa 1901.Photo # NH 73784, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama149kPhotograph taken during the early 1900s and reproduced on a contemporary color-tinted postal card.Photo # NH 57757-KN, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama318kStern view of the Alabama (BB-8), circa early 1900's. Photo from the collection of Raymond Strout, courtesy of Jonathan Eno.
BB-8 Alabama600kAlabama (BB-8) underway on a contemporary color-tinted postal card.Photo taken from Our Country in War by Murat Halstead (1898) via Robert Hurst.
BB-8 Alabama51kColor tinted print of the Alabama (BB-8) in port, circa 00's, before modernization of cage masts. USN photo courtesy of Jack Tretule.
BB-8 Alabama 543k Jealousy Rankles at Preference.
The proposed appointment of Commander Richard Wainwright to command the battleship Alabama (BB-8) is causing a strong undercurrent of dissatisfaction in naval circles. The Alabama is one of the largest battleships in the United States Navy and to be her commander is, therefore, considered one of the choice plums of the service. To give Wainwright this post it will be necessary to promote him to the rank of Captain. Naval men state that there are several existing captains whose claims to the post are much greater than that of Wainwright. President Roosevelt, however, is a great admirer of that officer and this explains the Navy Department's action as being "for the best interests of the service."
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI.
Photo from Evening Bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii) 1895-1912, 23 August 1902, Image 10, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 1.85k FORTS AND WARSHIPS READY FOR THE FRAY
Army Prepares to Prevent Invasion by the Approaching Hostile Fleets.
ONE OF THE LARGEST SHIPS {ALABAMA (BB-8)} ENGAGED IN THE PRESENT MANEUVERS OF THE ARMY AND NAVY AND THE TWO NOTED OFFICERS COMMANDING THE HOSTILE FLEETS
Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside.
Photo courtesy of The San Francisco Call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, 31 August 1902, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama119kCapt. Willard Herbert Brownson commanded of the battleship Alabama (BB-8) from 1902 to 1905. Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
Blazes Away 985k HOW OUR NAVAL GUNNERS BREAK RECORDS.
Their Marvelous Accuracy Only Attained by Constant Practice with Most Ingenious Mechanical Aids.
Champion crew of the Alabama's (BB-8) after turret.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 04 October 1903, Image 31, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama125kShip's Gunner and Gunner's Mates, 1903. Note the kitten and parrot mascots, and the comment written on the First Class Gunner's Mate at right.Photo # NH 57497, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama95kForward turret crew Gunner's Mates pose by the breech of one of the ship's 13"/35 guns, 1903. Note the ex-Apprentice marks (figure "8" knot badges) worn by two of these men.Photo # NH 57494, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama95kChampion guns crew with Lieutenant Lewis J. Clark, 1903. They are posed with a 13-inch shell, on the foredeck in front of the ship's forward 13"/35 gun turret.Photo # NH 57495.
BB-8 Alabama71kCrew members F. Petry (left) and W.M. Langridge (in gun) pose at the breech of one of the ship's 13"/35 guns, 1903. Note the "A" with figure "8" knot on Petry's shirt.Photo # NH 57496, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama94k The submarine Plunger (SS-02) hauled out of the water at a Navy yard, circa 1903-1905. Alabama (BB-8) is in the right background. Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Joe Cahn, 1990. Photo # NH 102428, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama79kAlabama (BB-8) seen off New York in 1904. Photo courtesy of maritimequest.com & submitted by Bill Gonyo.
BB-8 Alabama61k Anchored off New York City, 1905. She is flying a rear admiral's flag at her mainmast peak. Photographed by C.C. Langill, New York. USNHC photo # NH 105551, from the collection of Warren Beltramini, donated by Beryl Beltramini, 2007.
BB-8 Alabama59kAlabama (BB-8) anchored off New York City, with several steam launches and other boats alongside, 1905. She is flying a rear admiral's flag at her mainmast peak. Photographed by C.C. Langill, New York. USNHC photo # NH 105573, from the collection of Warren Beltramini, donated by Beryl Beltramini, 2007.
BB-8 Alabama650kPost card of the Alabama (BB-8). Photo courtesy of SK/3 Tommy Trampp.
BB-8 Alabama 3.28k BATTLESHIPS IN CRASH
TWO RUN AGROUND
Alabama (BB-8) Rams Kentucky (BB-6) in Avoiding Stranded Kearsarge (BB-5) All Off.

While five of the big battleships of the North Atlantic squadron, under Rear Admiral Evans,were steaming out to sea yesterday, bound for Hampton Roads, the Kearsarge and the Kentucky went aground, about noon, off the northwest point of the East Bank, about a mile and a half south of Norton's Island and two miles east of West Bank Light. The Alabama, fourth in line, tore through the channel and struck the Kentucky on the starboard quarter with terrific force, tearing a hole in her own port bow and seriously damaging the Kentucky. The fleet was proceeding under reduced speed, probably not more than seven or eight knots, when the high wind and strong tide eddies played havoc with the Kentucky, forcing her to swing almost half a mile off the main channel.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.& University of California, Riverside.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 08 January 1906, Image 1, & The San Francisco Call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, Image 3 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 816k AMERICA'S STRONGEST SQUADRON.
VESSELS OF NORTH ATLANTIC FLEET ASSEMBLED AT PENSACOLA.
Officers and Crew of Battleship Alabama (BB-8).
After-turret of the Battleship Missouri (BB-11) in which the charge of the twelve-inch gun at left prematurely exploded killing thirty-two men and wounding two.
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI.
Photo from The Pacific Commercial Advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, 06 May 1904, Image 6, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 640k Battleships in Danger.
These three battleships figured in a remarkable naval accident in New York bay January 7. The Kentucky (BB-6) which ran aground and was rammed by the Alabama (BB-8) is in the picture at the upper left. The Alabama is in the upper right. At the lower left is the Kearsarge (BB-5) which also ran aground. The diagram in the lower right shows how the accidents occurred. It is drawn from a description furnished by Rear Admiral Davis.
Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo from The Spanish Fork Press. (Spanish Fork, Utah) 1902-current, 18 January 1906, Image 3, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama75kAt anchor, 2 May 1907. Note the semaphore "paddles" mounted on her foremast. These were fitted to her mainmast in 1901.Photo # NH 72262, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
Great White Fleet Cruise
BB-18 Connecticut 2.19k GETTING THE BATTLESHIPS AT THE BROOKLYN NAVY YARD READY FOR THEIR VOYAGE TO THE PACIFIC.
BLOCKING UP THE ALABAMA (BB-8) IN DRYDOCK.
THE SHIP'S POST-OFFICE ON THE CONNECTICUT (BB-18).
REPAIRING A PROPELLER OF THE CONNECTICUT.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 November 1907, Image 19, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Great White Fleet112kChart from a contemporary newspaper, showing the route to be taken by the Atlantic Fleet's battleships and their associated Torpedo Flotilla, from their December 1907 departure from Hampton Roads, Virginia, until their planned arrival at San Francisco, California, in the spring of 1908. Text below the chart indicates that it was published in mid-December 1907.U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 106219. Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation, Washington, D.C. Collection of Rear Admiral Harold M. Bemis.
Great White Fleet 345k The "Great White Fleet" steaming in column, probably while departing Hampton Roads, Virginia, at the start of their cruise around the World, December 1907. Kansas (BB-21) is at left, followed by Vermont (BB-20). USN photo # N-0000X-001 courtesy of navy.mil. Photographed by C.E. Waterman, Hampton, Va.
Eighteen-inch Torpedo 64k Eighteen-inch Torpedo (Whitehead type).
On board a U.S. Navy battleship of the Indiana class (BB-1 / 3) or Maine class (BB-10 / 12) , circa 1907-1908. This view may have been taken during the "Great White Fleet" World cruise.
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 106066. Collection of Chief Quartermaster John Harold.
Hard-Hat Diver 72k "Hard-Hat" Diver descending from the stern of a launch alongside a battleship, circa 1907-1908. Note the 6"/50 broadside gun mounted in the battleship's hull side.
This ship is either Indiana class (BB-1 / 3) or Maine class (BB-10 / 12) or Virginia class (BB-13 / 17) battleship.
This view may have been taken during the "Great White Fleet" World cruise.
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 106072. Collection of Chief Quartermaster John Harold.
Great White Fleet112kChart from a contemporary newspaper, showing the route of the Atlantic Fleet's battleships from their 29 January 1907 departure from Trinidad until their arrival at Rio de Janeiro, Brazil on 12 January 1908. It emphasizes the offshore course taken to avoid strong westerly currents off the northeastern coast of South America.U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 106221. Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation, Washington, D.C. Collection of Rear Admiral Harold M. Bemis.
Straits of Magellan290k The "Great White Fleet" in the Straits of Magellan, 1908, from a painting by Henry Reuterdahl.Photograph courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
Great White Fleet129kChart from a contemporary newspaper, showing the movements of the Atlantic Fleet's battleships from their 8 February 1908 passage of the western part of the Straits of Magellan until their arrival at Callao, Peru, on 20 February 1908.U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 106227b. Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation, Washington, D.C. Collection of Rear Admiral Harold M. Bemis.
BB-18 Connecticut185kThe Connecticut (BB-18) leading the other fifteen warships of the "Great White Fleet" into Magdalena Bay, Mexico on 12 March 1908 to take on coal and hold long-delayed target practice. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH-59537, courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
PDF Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA
Photo & text by The San Francisco Call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, 29 March 1908, Image 5, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Fleet at Long Beach 507k The fleet at San Diego, Calif., 5, May 1908.
What looks like two Connecticut class (BB-18 / 22 & 25) battleships to the left; a Virginia class (BB-13 / 17) battleship in the center with what might be three other Connecticut class (BB-18 / 22 & 25) battleships in the immediate distance; two Illinois class (BB-7 / 9) battleships are on the right corner, behind them are the two Kearsarge class (BB-5 / 6) battleships and a Virginia class (BB-13 / 17) or Connecticut class (BB-18 / 22 & 25) battleship in the right corner of the photo.
Library of Congress photo # pan 6a33626,by W. D. Lambert; submitted by Tom Kermen.
Great White Fleet 192k The "Great White Fleet" lies in San Francisco Bay on 6 May 1908.
Nearest ship is an Indiana class (BB-1 / 3) battleship. Ahead of it are what appears to be two Maine class (BB-10 / 12)battleships.
Photo by Louis Bostwick, courtesy of greatwhitefleet.info, by William Stewart.
BB-8 Alabama114kAlabama (BB-8) in 1908 off San Diego, California. Note her name across the top of her bridge.Photo # NH 73315 / USN.
BB-8 Alabama512kAlabama (BB-8) in a California port, 1908. The photo is from a collection called "California Reception to the Fleet 1908. USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Naval Review in San Francisco Bay, 17 May 1908 155k Panoramic photograph by the Pillsbury Picture Company showing the review of the "Great White Fleet" on 17 May 1908 by Secretary of the Navy Victor A. Metcalf, embarked in Yorktown (PG-1), which is steaming toward the left in the right center of the image. Three destroyers are in the line nearest to the camera (from left to center), with either Hopkins (DD-6) or Hull (DD-7) in the center and Lawrence (DD-8) next astern. Eleven battleships are present, in the rows on the opposite side of Yorktown's course, and seven Pacific Fleet armored cruisers are in the most distant row. Photo # NH 105310, from the collections of the U.S. Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama 549k THE BATTLESHIPS MAINE (BB-10) AND ALABAMA (BB-8) HOMEWARD BOUND.Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI.
Photo from The Hawaiian Gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, 19 June 1908, Image 2, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
GWF901kTHE ATLANTIC FLEET OF THE UNITED STATES NAVY
From Official Bulletin of Bureau of Navigation showing the Vessels off the Port of Callao practicing the Gridiron maneuver. This is considered by Naval authorities to be the most dangerous evolution in steam tactics and its improper execution caused the loss of HMS Victoria with 798 men in 1893.
Picture faithfully represents the entire Fleet in official formation and vessels can be identified by numbers corresponding to table appended:
First Division
1. Connecticut (BB-18), Flagship, 2. Kansas (BB-21), 3. Vermont (BB-20), 4. Louisiana (BB-19),
Second Division
5. Georgia (BB-15), Flagship, 6. New Jersey (BB-16), 7. Rhode Island (BB-17), 8. Virginia (BB-13),
18 Torpedo Flotilla
Whipple (DD-15), Truxtun (DD-14), Lawrence (DD-8), Stewart (DD-13), Hopkins (DD-6) & Hull (DD-7)
Third Division
9. Minnesota (BB-22), Flagship, 10. Ohio (BB-12), 11. Missouri (BB-11), 12. Maine (BB-10)
17. Yankton {Special Dispatch Tender}
Fourth Division
13. Alabama (BB-8), Flagship 14. Illinois (BB-7), 15. Kearsarge (BB-5), 16. Kentucky (BB-6)
19. Auxiliaries
Glacier, [refrigerating ship], Panther,[repair ship], Culgea, [storeship] & Arethusa,[torpedo flotilla tender].
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by The National Tribune. (Washington, D.C.) 1877-1917, 24 September 1908, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 1.80k Battleship Alabama (BB-8) Her Commander and Route of Her 35,000 Mile Trip
ENDS 35,000 MILE TRIP READY FOR A FIGHT OR FROLIC
To Be Sure Alabama Has a Cracked Cylinder but Whats the Odds?
DOES 12 KNOTS AN HOUR
Blames Coal Hog Maine (BB-10) for Her Being Kept From Visiting the Japs
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Evening World.(New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, 20 October 1908, Final Results Edition, Image 6, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama66kWith Captain Ten Eyck DeWitt Veeder in command the Alabama (BB-8) accompanied the "Great White Fleet" on its voyage around the South American continent as far as San Francisco. On 18 May 1908 when the bulk of the Fleet headed north to visit the Pacific northwest, she remained at San Francisco for repairs at the Mare Island Navy Yard. As a consequence, the warship did not participate in the celebrated visit to Japan. Instead, Alabama and Maine (BB-10) departed San Francisco on June to complete their own, more direct, circumnavigation of the globe. Steaming by way of Honolulu and Guam, the two battleships arrived at Manila in the Philippines on 20 July. In August, they visited Singapore and Colombo on the island of Ceylon. From Colombo, the two battleships made their way, via Aden on the Arabian Peninsula to the Suez Canal. Through the canal early in September. Alabama and Maine made an expeditious transit of the Mediterranean Sea, pausing only at Naples at mid-month. Following a port call at Gibraltar, they embarked upon the Atlantic passage on 4 October. They made one stop, in the Azores, on their way across the Atlantic. On 19 October as they neared the end of their long voyage, the two battleships parted company. Maine headed for Portsmouth, N.H.; and Alabama steered for New York. Both reached their destinations on the 20th. Alabama was placed in reserve at New York on 3 November 1908. Though she remained inactive at New York, the battleship was not decommissioned until 17 August 1909.Photo courtesy of the James Melville Gilliss Library via Bill Gonyo.
BB-8 Alabama 3.05k THE ALABAMA (BB-8) AFTER HER LONG CRUISE
This is a photograph of the battleship Alabama taken the day she dropped anchor off Tompklnsvllle N. Y. after a world encyclical tour in which she logged off more than 36,000 miles. The Alabama is now in dry dock where several hundred thousand dollars are to be expended in bringing her up to the standard required for service. A flaw in her engines made it necessary for her to leave the great American fleet with which she embarked last December.
Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo from Deseret Evening News.(Great Salt Lake City [Utah]) 1867-1920, 14 November 1908, Last Edition, Image 11, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
1910's
Alabama 145k Naval Militia boarding Alabama (BB-8) 1910. Digital ID # ggbain 13761, LC-B2- 2777-5 Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection, via flickr.com/photos/library_of_congress.
BB-8 Alabama260kPost card photo of the Alabama (BB-8) by Enrique Muller Jr, circa 1910's. Photo courtesy of SK/3 Tommy Trampp.
Preston162kCommander Charles Francis Preston was the commanding officer of the battleship Alabama (BB-8) in 1912.Photo courtesy of the USNA Alumni Association via Bill Gonyo.
BB-8 Alabama93k Off New York City, during the October 1912 Naval Review.Photo # NH 57753, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama 883k SECOND NAVAL BATTALION BACK FROM CRUISE.
Kingsley L. Martin, battalion's commanding officer, and the Alabama (BB-8), practice vessel.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune.(New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 21 July 1913, Image 12, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Caperton 140k Admiral William B. Caperton became Commander in Chief, Atlantic Reserve Fleet, Alabama (BB-8), flagship, in 1913 and after a year's service in that command, he assumed command in November 1914 of Cruiser Squadron, Atlantic Fleet, Washington (ACR-11), flagship. In 1915 he transferred his flag to Tennessee (ACR-10), and later to Dolphin (PG-24), he commanded the Naval Forces that intervened at Haiti in 1915-1916; was Commander Naval Forces, Vera Cruz, in 1915; and commanded Naval Forces intervening and suppressing the Santo Domingo Revolution in 1916.Digital ID: ggbain # 15823. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
BB-1 Indiana 42.57k ARGENTINE SAILORS DRILLING AT NAVY YARD ON THE NOSE ENDS OF FIVE OF UNCLE SAM'S NAVAL BULLDOGS
An unusual photograph, taken at League Island, showing five battleships and steamer lying in a row while the seamen of the South American Republic make themselves as much at home as if on their own drill grounds, by special arrangement with the U.S. government.
Either the Indiana (BB-1) or the Massachusetts (BB-2) is the first battleship on the left side. The distinctive twin funnels of the Illinois (BB-7) or Alabama (BB-8) appear two ships down.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 05 March 1915, Night Extra, Image 16, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 605k CROWD WATCHES BATTLESHIP ALABAMA (BB-8) DEPART SUDDENLYImage and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 29 March 1915, Night Extra, Image 4, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama55kCommander Edward H. Watson, USN spent most of World War I in command of the transport Madawaska and battleship Alabama (BB-8), receiving the Navy Cross for his "exceptionally meritorious service" in the latter. Photograph dated 10 May 1915.
His career was washed up after his court martial for the Honda Point Grounding. Considering the ships had no radar and steaming in a heavy fog but there always has to be a fall guy. It does not mention when he was promoted to Captain but I would assume he held the rank while in command of the Alabama.
Photograph # 24-P-90 from the U.S. Navy Bureau of Personnel Collections in the U.S. National Archives & submitted by Bill Gonyo.
BB-1 Indiana 443k A PANORAMIC VIEW OF THE BACK BASIN AT LEAUGE ISLAND)
The Illinois (BB-7) or Alabama (BB-8) appears to the right.
Other battleships appear on the left along the pier.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 19 June 1915, Final, Image 16, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama 607k NEW COMMANDANT INDUCTED INTO OFFICE AT NAVY YARD
Captain Robert Lee Russell, formerly commander of the battleship South Carolina (BB-26), arrived at Leauge Island Navy Yard today to assume charge of the affairs of the naval station. Captain Russell succeeds the late Captain John J. Knapp. The picture shows the reception of the new commandant on the Alabama (BB-8).
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 03 December 1915, Night Extra, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama56kAlabama (BB-8), Illinois (BB-7) and Maine (BB-10) in the Canal Zone, Balboa. Port Captain's office in rear-the building with many windows. The other buildings are the Mechanical division, shops, etc. Circa 1915 plus.From the collection of Charles Munson. Courtesy Doris & Chuk Munson.
BB-8 Alabama46kWhen the United States entered World War I, Admiral Albert Parker Niblack took command of Division 1, Atlantic Fleet, with Alabama (BB-8), as flagship 5 April 1917, and was appointed Rear Admiral 31 August. Niblack assumed command of Squadron 2, Patrol Force, 23 October and served in this post through the Armistice.Digital ID: ggbain # 15930. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
Niblack490kAdmiral Albert Parker Niblack took command of Division 1, Atlantic Fleet, with Alabama (BB-8) as flagship 5 April 1917, and was appointed Rear Admiral 31 August 1917. Niblack assumed command of Squadron 2, Patrol Force, 23 October and served in this post through the Armistice. This is an image of RADM Niblack and his staff taken on Gibraltar by an unknown photographer.
When the United States entered World War I, Admiral Albert Parker Niblack took command of Division 1, Atlantic Fleet, with Alabama (BB-8) as flagship 5 April 1917, and was appointed Rear Admiral 31 August. Niblack assumed command of Squadron 2, Patrol Force, 23 October and served in this post through the Armistice.
Here is how Niblack describe his command:
In August 1917, the United States Navy had also begun operating out of Gibraltar, at first just in the Atlantic approaches, but later in the Mediterranean itself. The force included three of the only modern scout cruisers -- the Birmingham (CL-2), the Salem (CL-3), and the Chester (CL-1) -- as well as a heterogeneous collection of five ancient Bainbridge class (DD-1 / 13) destroyers sent from the Philippines via the Suez Canal, several gunboats, six Coast Guard cutters, and ten yachts. The American commander, the sharp tongued Rear Admiral Albert Niblack, described his command as "a lot of junk here that has to be continuously rebuilt to keep it going." With respect to the old destroyers, he said: "Every time they go out I feel particularly anxious until they get in again." Two modern destroyers joined the command in the summer of 1918 along with the well equipped, and badly needed, repair ship, the Buffalo (AD-8). [I believe later on the British described our destroyers as "scandalous".]
Image from the digital library of East Carolina University, courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
BB-8 Alabama101kUnderway on 19 May 1918, following the removal of some of her midships six-inch guns.Photograph # 19-N-1-11-3, from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.
BB-8 Alabama104kUnderway, circa 1918, showing modifications made to the ship during the First World War.Photo # 60570, from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.
BB-8 Alabama84kOff Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, circa 1918. USN Library of Congress Photo # LC-D4-34060.
BB-8 Alabama 530k AMERICA'S BATTLE FLEET IS HONORED
Part of U. S. battle fleet in Hudson river, seen from Riverside drive, and Rear Admiral Gleaves on way to shore in power boat from Alabama (BB-8) during recent review.
Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ.
Photo from Bisbee Daily Review. (Bisbee, Ariz.) 1901-1971, 05 January 1919, MINING SECTION, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania, 138k Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania.
Ships in the Navy Yard's Reserve Basin, circa spring 1919. Panoramic photograph taken by Keystone Photo Studios, 817 So. Broad St., Philadelphia. The following ships can be identified from among those present:
Rowan (DD-64)); Preston (DD-19); Macdonough (DD-09); Patterson (DD-36); St. Louis (C-12); Ohio (BB-12); SC-342; SC-344; Alabama (BB-8); Kearsarge (BB-5); Illinois (BB-7); Ozark (Monitor -7); Kentucky(BB-6); and Hancock(AP-3).
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 98604, from the collection of Eugene Bennett, donated by his daughter, Jene B. Hart, September 1988.
BB-8 Alabama 2.13k 6 page PDF of the Alabama's (BB-8) Log, April 1919.Photos courtesy of Thomas Becher.
Almost Unknown901kSTRANGE MASCOTS OF THE FLEET
Coxswain Caulkett and his goat mascot Shooter, on board the Kentucky (BB-6). Redhead and 14 Bore, parrot mascots belonging to C. B. M. Rolenhagen and Coxswain Curtis of the New Jersey (BB-16). Goat mascots Caliber and Anchor of the Wyoming (BB-33). Boatswain's Mate B. P. Holloway and a close-up of Frisky, the Panama sugar bear mascot of the battleship Alabama (BB-8). Seaman Du Bois and his Panama squirrel Creeper aboard the Maryland (BB-46).
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from Evening Star. (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 07 September 1919, Image 80, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
PDF added 07/11/15.
Reserve Basin 77k Philadelphia Navy Yard, Pennsylvania, Warships in the Reserve Basin, 18 November 1919, as seen by a Philadelphia Evening Ledger photographer. Ships are (from left to right): Wisconsin (BB-9); Illinois (BB-7); Alabama (BB-8); a Pittsburgh class armored cruiser; two battleships, probably Connecticut class (BB-18 / 22 & 25) ; Stringham (DD-83); Craven (DD-70); Maury (DD-100); and Sigourney (DD-81). Photo # NH 42524, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
U-1111.20kU-111 showing the bridge at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, 8 April 1920.
In the background is the distinctive twin funnel belonging to an Indiana class (BB-1 / 3) battleship;
Illinois (BB-7); Alabama (BB-8) & Wisconsin (BB-9).
All three were docked there during this period; the Alabama & Wisconsin would be decommissioned the following month.
Photo courtesy of Craig O'Neil.
Destruction
BB-8 Alabama61k A white phosphorus bomb explodes on a mast top, while the Ex-Alabama (BB-8) in use as a target in Chesapeake Bay, 23 September 1921. An Army Martin twin-engine bomber is flying overhead. Photo # 57483, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama112kEx-Alabama (BB-8) is hit by a phosphorus bomb, while serving as a target for U.S. Army bombers in Chesapeake Bay, September 1921. An Army DH-4 type single-engine bomber is flying nearby. Photo # 924, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama83kEx-Alabama (BB-8) showing the effect of a phosphorus bomb, while serving as a target for U.S. Army bombers in Chesapeake Bay, 27 September 1921. An Army Martin twin-engine bomber is flying overhead. Also visible, in the foreground, is a Navy F5L seaplane. Wrecks in the distance are the old battleships San Marcos (furthest to the left) and Indiana (BB-1). This photograph has been hand-tinted in colors. Photograph # NH 263-KN, from the collections of the United States Naval Historical Center.
BB-8 Alabama43kEx-Alabama (BB-8) sunken wreck in Chesapeake Bay, photographed from off her starboard side, circa 1921. She had been used as a target for Army bombing tests in September of that year. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 57491. Donation of Lewis L. Smith, 1960.
BB-8 Alabama88kEx-Alabama (BB-8) serving as a bombing target in Chesapeake Bay, 27 September 1921. A U.S. Army Martin twin-engine bomber is flying in the right foreground. Wrecks in the distance are the old battleships San Marcos (furthest to the left) and Indiana (BB-1), both of which had previously been used as targets. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 80-G-424471. Donation of Lewis L. Smith, 1960.
BB-8 Alabama104k View on board the sunken wreck of the Ex-Alabama (BB-8) in Chesapeake Bay, after she had been used as a target for Army bombing tests in September 1921. This photograph looks forward from amidships, showing a boat crane, collapsed smokestacks and other wreckage. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 52586. Donation of Lewis L. Smith, 1960.
BB-8 Alabama86kEx-Alabama (BB-8) officers pose on the ship's after deck in September 1921, immediately before the commencement of the bombing tests in which the former Ex-Alabama was the target. Third from left, wearing an old-style uniform and large binoculars, is Lieutenant Commander Olaf M. Hustvedt, USN, who was then assigned to the Bureau of Ordnance. USNHC # NH 104540. Photo from the 1909-1924 album of Vice Admiral Olaf M. Hustvedt, USN (Retired). Courtesy of Rick Hauck, 2006.
BB-8 Alabama114kEx-Alabama (BB-8) officers pose on the ship's after deck in September 1921, immediately before the commencement of the bombing tests in which the former Ex-Alabama was the target. Third from left, wearing an old-style uniform and large binoculars, is Lieutenant Commander Olaf M. Hustvedt, USN, who was then assigned to the Bureau of Ordnance. USNHC # NH 104541. Photo from the 1909-1924 album of Vice Admiral Olaf M. Hustvedt, USN (Retired). Courtesy of Rick Hauck, 2006.
BB-8 Alabama82kMontage of six photographs taken during the early phases of September 1921 aerial bombing tests in which the former Ex-Alabama (BB-8) was the target. These views show the ship before the bombing began, a U.S. Army Martin bomber laying a smoke screen near the ship, and smoke screens near the ship and enveloping her.USNHC # NH 104538. Photo from the 1909-1924 album of Vice Admiral Olaf M. Hustvedt, USN (Retired). Courtesy of Rick Hauck, 2006.
BB-8 Alabama99kMontage of six photographs taken during the September 1921 aerial bombing tests in which the former Ex-Alabama (BB-8) was the target. These views show the ship under attack with phosphorus bombs. In two of the photos (middle-right and lower-left) the sunken hulk of ex-Indiana (BB-1) is visible in the left distance.USNHC # NH 104539. Photo from the 1909-1924 album of Vice Admiral Olaf M. Hustvedt, USN (Retired). Courtesy of Rick Hauck, 2006.
BB-8 Alabama86k Montage of six photographs taken during the September 1921 aerial bombing tests in which the former Ex-Alabama (BB-8) was the target. These views show the ship being enveloped by a smoke screen during the second day of the tests, a simulated torpedo attack by four U.S. Army Martin bombers, the explosion of two 300-pound bombs on the ship's forecastle, and damage caused by the explosion of those bombs. USNHC # NH 104542. Photo from the 1909-1924 album of Vice Admiral Olaf M. Hustvedt, USN (Retired). Courtesy of Rick Hauck, 2006.
BB-8 Alabama114kMontage of six photographs taken during the September 1921 aerial bombing tests in which the former Ex-Alabama (BB-8) was the target. These views show demolition bomb attacks on the ship, which was sunk in shallow water as a result of damage received from these and other bombs.USNHC # NH 104543. Photo from the 1909-1924 album of Vice Admiral Olaf M. Hustvedt, USN (Retired). Courtesy of Rick Hauck, 2006.
BB-8 Alabama57kEx-Alabama (BB-8) serving as a bombing target in Chesapeake Bay, 27 September 1921. A U.S. Army Martin twin-engine bomber is flying in the right foreground. Wrecks in the distance are the old battleships San Marcos (furthest to the left) and Indiana (BB-1), both of which had previously been used as targets. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 57492. Donation of Lewis L. Smith, 1960.
BB-8 Alabama57kView on board the sunken wreck of the Ex-Alabama (BB-8) in Chesapeake Bay, after she had been used as a target for Army bombing tests in September 1921. This photograph looks forward from to starboard of the forward 13"/35 gun turret, showing the deck blown upward as a result of a bomb explosion inside the bow. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 52583. Donation of Lewis L. Smith, 1960.
BB-8 Alabama52kView on board the sunken wreck of the Ex-Alabama (BB-8) in Chesapeake Bay, after she had been used as a target for Army bombing tests in September 1921. This photograph looks forward from the stern, showing the after 13"/35 gun turret and "cage" mainmast. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 52584. Donation of Lewis L. Smith, 1960.
BB-8 Alabama50kOfficers examine damage on the ship's deck, during bombing tests in which she was the target, September 1921. The smoke may come from remnants of a phosphorus bomb. At left, with his back to the camera, is Lieutenant Commander Olaf M. Hustvedt, USN, who was then serving with the Bureau of Ordnance.USNHC # NH 104544. Photo from the 1909-1924 album of Vice Admiral Olaf M. Hustvedt, USN (Retired). Courtesy of Rick Hauck, 2006.
BB-8 Alabama235kEx-Alabama (BB-8) begins to heel over after being hit by 1,000- and 2,000-pound bombs while being employed as a target hulk by the USAAC, Chesapeake Bay, 15 September 1921. USAAF photo courtesy of Robert Hurst.
BB-8 Alabama 1.54k KNELL OF BATTLESHIPS.Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 09 October 1921, SUNDAY MORNING, Image 22, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-8 Alabama118k Ship's hulk being scrapped at the Union Shipbuilding Company, Baltimore, Maryland, 2 June 1928. Alabama (BB-8) had been sunk in bombing tests in September 1921 and had to be raised for scrapping. Note the cofferdam used to seal her hull amidships, and the dished-in side plating caused by near-miss bomb explosions. Photograph # 19-N-11926, from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.

Additional Alabama Images
4 General Views Of Alabama From The Library Of Congress Server.

USS ALABAMA BB-8 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry
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