.Battleship Photo Index BB-28 USS DELAWARE

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BB-28 USS DELAWARE


Delaware Class Battleship: Displacement 20,000 Tons, Dimensions, 518' 9" (oa) x 85' 3" x 28' 10" (Max). Armament 10 x 12"/45 14 x 5"/50, 2 x 21" tt. Armor, 11" Belt, 12" Turrets, 3" Decks, 11 1/2" Conning Tower. Machinery, 25,000 SHP; vertical, triple expansion engines, 2 screws. Speed, 21 Knots, Crew 933.

Operational and Building Data: Laid down by Newport News, Shipbuilding, Newport News, VA., November 11, 1907. Launched February 6, 1909. Commissioned April 4, 1910. Decommissioned November 10, 1923. Stricken November 10, 1923.
Fate: Broken up for scrap at the Philadelphia Naval Ship Yard during 1924.
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Keel Laying / Commissioning
1907 - 1910

BB-16 New Jersey 2.15k BONAPARTE IS DELUGED By ADVICE ON WARSHIP
Tips on Place of Building and Names for Rival of Dreadnought Coming Freely
.... Today Senator Allee and Representative Burton of Delaware called upon Mr Bonaparte and urged that the ship be named in honor of their State. The national legislators from Delaware cited to the Secretary the fact that their State is the only one of the older States of the Union that has not been given the distinction of a battleship.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 29 March 1906, Last Edition, Image 8, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Texas2.11kMonster Authorized for American Navy Wonder of Fighting Capacity
SEAFIGHTER POWERFUL ENOUGH TO OVERCOME FIVE LIKE THE TEXAS
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.] 1902-1939, 02 April 1906, Last Edition, Image 9, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 3.52k THE NEW CONSTITUTION.
This Will be the Most Powerful Battleship Afloat
More Destructive and Terrible than the new Floating Giant, the English "DREADNOUGHT" — Old "Constitution to be Saved.
Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside.
Photo from Amador Ledger. (Jackson, Amador County, Calif.) 1875-19??, 04 May 1906, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 3.39k GREATEST FIGHTING SHIP EVER PLANNED - UNCLE SAM'S NEW "CONSTITUTION"Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside.
Photo from The San Francisco Call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, 16 September 1906, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 837k LARGEST BATTLESHIP EVER DESIGNED FOR AMERICAN NAVY
Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL.
Photo from Rock Island Argus. (Rock Island, Ill.) 1893-1920, 14 March 1908, Image 6, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
PDF added 07/23/15.
BB-28 Delaware2.61kBATTLESHIPS ARE ALWAYS CHEAPER THAN WAR
1908, THE DELAWARE (BB-28), LARGEST BATTLESHIP, 1898, THE IOWA (BB-4) LARGEST BATTLESHIP
Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN.
Photo from The Appeal. (Saint Paul, Minn.) 1889-19??, 21 March 1908, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 816k AMERICAN DREADNOUGHTS TO RIVAL BRITISH PROTOTYPE
A race is in progress for the completion of the first of the 20,000 ton Dreadnoughts of the American Navy, the battleships Delaware (BB-28) and North Dakota (BB-29). The Newport News Shipbuilding and Drydock company is building the Delaware, and the Fore River company of Quincy Mass., has the contract for the other vessel. These ships will be far more powerful than any others in the navy and will rival their monster prototype, which is the boast of the British navy.
Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ.
Photo from Daily Arizona Silver Belt. (Globe, Gila County, Ariz.) 1906-1929, 01 May 1908, Image 4, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 3.32k New Battleships of the Dreadnought Type;
Does the Peace of the World Depend Upon Them?

The Delaware (BB-28) is shown under construction at Newport News, Shipbuilding, Newport News, VA.
The North Dakota (BB-29) is shown as she will appear when completed.
Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo from Deseret Evening News. (Great Salt Lake City [Utah]) 1867-1920, 24 October 1908, Last Edition, Part Two, Image 15, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 3.38k First American DREADNOUGHT, the Delaware (BB-28) Launched Yesterday, and Photo of Sponsor
Miss Anne P. Cahall of Bridgeville informed Governor Lea that she will accept the appointment as sponsor for the battleship Delaware which is to be launched at Newport News about February 1.
Governor Lea asked Miss Cahall to christen the new Americana dreadnought as a courtesy to his successor Governor elect Simeon S. Pennewill, who will become chief executive of the State before the battleship is launched.
Miss Cahall is a niece of the governor elect and of Judge James Pennewill of this city. Her father Dr. Lawrence M. Cahall is a prominent physician at Bridgeville.
With the announcement of the early launching of the battleship bearing the State's name, the Womens Christian Temperance Union of Delaware has renewed its fight to have the giant 28000 ton vessel christened with water.
Images and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC & University of California, Riverside.
Photo from The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 01 January 1909, Last Edition, Image 14 & Los Angeles Herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, 07 February 1909, Image 2 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 1.37k BATTLESHIP DELAWARE (BB-28) LAUNCHED AMIDST SCENES OF SPLENDOR.
Thousands shout their enthusiasm.
Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA.
Photo from The Times Dispatch. (Richmond, Va.) 1903-1914, 07 February 1909, Image 3 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 3.38k Greatest battleship in world is launched at Newport News.Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA.
Photo from The San Francisco Call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, 07 February 1909, Image 19 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 3.68k World's Biggest Naval Splash!
First photograph of the launching of the Delaware (BB-28) at Newport News VA.
When on February 6 the hull of the American battleship Delaware slid rasping down the ways at Newport News, Va., and pushed stern foremost into the briny, the world's greatest naval splash resulted. The Delaware is the very largest battleship ever launched. When Great Britain launched her DREADNOUGHT less than two years ago, the last word in magnitude of battleships was thought to have been uttered. The "DREADNOUGHT fever" then seized the other powers. Germany, France, Japan and the United States all accepted it as a challenge.
With the least ado over the matter, the United States has now come forward with a vessel that will be 2100 tons heavier than the DREADNOUGHT, and nearly that much heavier than any other warship building or projected abroad. Tho Delaware will have 20,000 tons displacement when completed. This great splash may be only the beginning; after all. Such naval enthusiasts as Richmond Pearson Hobson predicton—nay, demand — battleship's of 30,000 tons!
Image provided by: Washington State Library; Olympia, WA. & University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA.
Photo from The Tacoma Times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, 16 February 1909, Image 3, Image 18 & The San Francisco Call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, 22 September 1907, Image 6, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 3.62k Uncle Sam's First Two Dreadnoughts Which Soon Will Be Placed in Commission in East
UNCLE SAM'S first two Dreadnoughts, the battleships North Dakota (BB-29) and Delaware (BB-28), are practically completed and soon will be in commission. The Delaware is now having her powerful guns installed at Newport News and the North Dakota is getting: ready for her trial at Quincy, Mass. These two leviathans differ from the other battleships of our navy in many respects aside from their tremendous size. The most striking difference is noted in the long, rakish hulls, the absence of the high superstructures so predominant in the older ships and the five immense turrets which protect the ten twelve-inch rifles that each of the ships will carry.
It is estimated that either the Delaware or the North Dakota with their high speed will be more than a match for any other three ships now in the navy. The North Dakota is to have her speed trials November 2, and if she comes up to expectations she will be a vessel to be feared by anything that floats the seas. These great fighting machines each cost $10,000,000.
Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside; Riverside, CA.
Photo from Los Angeles Herald. (Los Angeles [Calif.]) 1900-1911, 15 October 1909, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 2.80k THE DELAWARE (BB-28), THE FIRST AMERICAN DREADNOUGHT.
Which exceeded the contract speed of 21 knots on the standardization runs yesterday over the Rockland (Me.) course making 21.98 knots and breaking the speed record for American battleships.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 October 1909, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 2.88k THE BATTLESHIP DELAWARE (BB-28) ON HER TRIAL TRIP
DELAWARE AT HOME!

Enters Virginia Capes with Brooms at Masthead.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo by Paul Thompson from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 27 October 1909, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware1.10kTwelve-mile range over which our new dreadnought could scatter death and destruction.Photo courtesy of New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 31 October 1909, Image 17, via flickr.com/photos/library_of_congress.
BB-28 Delaware 4.69k How Those Queer New Masts Look Close Up. Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA.
Photo from The Tacoma Times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, 30 November 1909, Image 3 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 497k GIANT BATTLESHIP DELAWARE (BB-28), MOST POWERFUL OF ALL MODERN FIGHTING CRAFT AFLOAT, READY TO JOIN NAVY
Comparison Shows That Latest Product of Newport News Plant is Finer Ship Than Her Sister, the Fore River-Built North Dakota (BB-29).
HAS GREATER STEAMING RADIUS; BURNS LESS COAL
Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA.
Photo from Daily Press. (Newport News, Va.) 1896-current, 12 December 1909, Image 22, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-29 North Dakota 79k Installing a 12"/45 gun in a battleship gun turret. This is probably Turret # 3 of either Delaware (BB-28) or North Dakota (BB-29). The view may have been taken while the ship was under construction, circa 1909-1910. The original image is printed on post card ("AZO") stock. A handwritten inscription penciled on its reverse ("Franklin") has no obvious bearing on the subject of the photo. USNHC photo # NH 105785, Donation of Charles R. Haberlein Jr., 2008.
BB-28 Delaware562kThe Delaware (BB-28) probably fitting out at Newport News, Shipbuilding, Newport News, VA., sometime after launching 6 February 1909 and before commissioning 4 April 1910.
Note the lack of a commissioning flag at her bow.
Photo # LC-B2-923-12 courtesy of memory.loc.gov. via Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division Washington, D.C & commons.wikimedia.org.
BB-28 Delaware91kRunning trials, circa late 1909.USNHC # NH 61870.
BB-28 Delaware145kStarboard and mast view of the Delaware (BB-28) as completed, a line drawing by A.L. Raven. Photo and text courtesy of U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
BB-18 LOC 613k Oregon (BB-3) Versus Delaware (BB-28).
What Would Happen if Old and Modern Met?
Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI.
Photo from The Pacific Commercial Advertiser. (Honolulu, Hawaiian Islands) 1885-1921, 17 April 1910, Sunday Edition, Feature Section, Image 13, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
1910's
BB-28 Delaware 3.55k Delaware (BB-28) First American Warship to Use Fuel Oil
Battleship Delaware taking on 204 tons of fuel oil from a barge at Norfolk, Va. on 27 May. The Delaware is the first battleship in the United States navy to use oil for fuel purposes.
Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside.
Photo courtesy of The San Francisco Call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, 17 June 1910, Image 4, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-17 Rhode Island3.20kBATTLESHIPS OF THE NORTH ATLANTIC FLEET COMING UP THE RIVER.
THE RHODE ISLAND (BB-17) UNDER THE BROOKLYN BRIDGE.
THE DREADNOUGHT DELAWARE (BB-28) BIGGEST SHIP IN OUR NAVY
THE CONNECTICUT (BB-18) BETWEEN THE BATTERY AND THE STATUE OF LIBERTY
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 28 September 1910, Image 7, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-29 North Dakota 1.60k Delaware (BB-28) in DD # 4 Brooklyn Navy Yard, 1910.
The Mast Funnel arrangement (mast, funnel, mast, funnel) is unique to the Delaware class and the three stripes on the aft funnel marks her as BB-28 prior to WWI.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
Photo courtesy of shorpy.com
BB-28 Delaware 1.07k SCOUTING SHIPS TO TRY TO LOCATE THE ENEMY'S BATTLESHIPS APPROACHING CUBA FROM ENGLANDImage and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo from The Evening Standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1910-1913, 30 December 1910, Image 8, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Holland 830k Holland (SS-01) high and dry at Norfolk Navy Yard, circa late 1910 through June 1913.
She was decommissioned and simultaneously struck from the Naval Register, 21 November 1910, at Norfolk, VA; Final Disposition, sold, 18 June, 1913, to Henry A. Hintner & Sons, Philadelphia, PA.
The battleship in the background is the Virginia class Georgia (BB-15).(Based on her mainmast's square top). The battleship on the right is the Delaware (BB-28).
Photo from the private collection of Ric Hedman.
Photo & text i.d. courtesy of Chuck Haberlein, Ric Hedman & Chris Hoehn.
Guantanamo Bay, Cuba62kPanoramic image (made from two individual views), showing U.S. Atlantic Fleet battleships and auxiliaries in Guantanamo Bay, circa the early or middle 1910s.
Ships present include (in left half of image): four Virginia class (BB-13 / 17) battleships, one South Carolina class (BB-26 / 27) battleship, one Delaware class (BB-28 / 29) battleship, two unidentified auxiliaries and a collier; (in right half of image): all six Connecticut class (BB-18 / 22 & 25) battleships, both Mississippi class (BB-23 / 24) battleships, two unidentified auxiliaries, hospital ship Solace (AH-2) and a gunboat.
USNHC # NH 104537. Photo from the 1909-1924 album of Vice Admiral Olaf M. Hustvedt, USN (Retired). Courtesy of Rick Hauck, 2006.
John Hood177kCaptain John Hood was the Commanding Officer of the battleship Delaware (BB-28) in 1911-1912. Under his command the Delaware won the battle efficiency pennant during this period. Photo #15824v courtesy of the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
BB-28 Delaware 1.06k EIGHT MEN KILLED ON BATTLESHIP WHILE AT SEA
Wireless From the Delaware (BB-28) Tells of Fatal Scalding of Crew Members.
DUE TO EXPLOSION.
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation & Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from The Evening World. (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, 17 January 1911, Final Edition, Image 1 & New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 18 January 1911, Image 1 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 2.33k The Battleship Delaware (BB-28) and Her Great Cruise Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA.
Photo from The Caldwell Watchman. (Columbia, La.) 1885-1946, 03 February 1911, Image 2, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 1.99k Famous Battleship Delaware (BB-28), Which Will Represent the United States at Coronation and Scenes Aboard Her
Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota.
Photo by Bismarck Daily Tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, 20 June 1911, Image 1, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 673k Greatest Sea Fighter In the World
The above photograph shows the Delaware (BB-28), the greatest sea fighter afloat, leaving New York harbor, on her journey across the ocean to take part in the naval pageant at King George's coronation.
After visiting Wilmington, Del., from 3 to 9 October 1910, to receive a gift of a silver service from the state, Delaware sailed from Hampton Roads 1 November with the First Division, Atlantic Fleet, to visit Weymouth, England, and Cherbourg, France, and after battle practice at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, returned to Norfolk 18 January 1911. She departed 31 January to carry the remains of Chilean Minister Cruz to Valparaiso, sailing by way of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, and Punta Arenas, Chile. Returning to New York 5 May, she sailed 4 June for Portsmouth, England, where from 19 to 28 June she took part in the fleet review accompanying the coronation of King George V.
Image and text provided by University of Oregon, Knight Library; Eugene, OR., Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA, & DANFS.
Photo from Medford Mail Tribune. (Medford, Or.) 1909-1989, 20 June 1911, Image 1, & The Times Dispatch (Richmond, Va.) 1903-1914, 23 June 1911, Image 7, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware85kPhotographed circa 1911. Note that the 12"/45 guns of her after turret are at different elevations.USNHC # NH 96126.
BB-15 Georgia 2.53k Coast Awaits Warships - Pacific Fleet Assured
Four of the big battleships that probably will be seen in the Pacific before the close of the year.
Georgia (BB-15), Louisiana (BB-19), Delaware (BB-28) & North Dakota (BB-29) will probably comprise one squadron of the battleship fleet which the navy department will order to the Pacific coast during the coming summer or fall.
Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside.
Photo by The San Francisco Call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, 09 April 1911, Image 17, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
TRAINING 4.2.57k TRAINING THE MODERN DREADNOUGHT TO FIGHT
[A]LONE in His Study, the Naval Officer Wages Battles in His Mind with Foreign Sea Monsters, to Help Solve Such Problems as Gunnery and Military Masts Present
Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside.
Photo from The San Francisco Call. (San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, 31 December 1911, Image 6, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-29 North Dakota 202k 1st Div American Fleet in Portland Harbor: Identifiable ships include the two Delaware class (BB-28 / 29) battleships, Delaware (BB-28) & North Dakota (BB-29), with a Virginia class (BB-13 / 17) battleship to the left. Digital ID ggbain # 15953. LC-B2-2903-13. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection.
BB-28 Delaware490kIn 1912, Captain Hugh Rodman assumed command of Delaware (BB-28).Digital ID ggbain # 15953. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
BB-28 Delaware708k Delaware (BB-28) and Presidential Yacht Mayflower on 14 October 1912. The ships are part of a Naval Review in the Hudson River in New York City.Source: Library of Congress, Photo No. LC-B2-2331-14, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-28 Delaware102k Delaware (BB-28) during the Naval Review off New York City on 14 October 1912. Digital ID: # 2162984213_da72a17202_o. LC-B2-2332-13. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection, courtesy of Tom Kermen.
BB-28 Delaware2.3kA ship's gig sails past the Delaware (BB-28), probably during the Naval Review off New York City on 14 October 1912.Courtesy Associate Professor Neville T.Kirk, USNA., via USNIP, submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-28 Delaware101kA gig passes near the stern of the Delaware (BB-28) while in port with other battleships. Note the open secondary gun port. Digital ID: # ggbain-19078, LC-B2-3473-9. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection.
Delaware 194k Delaware (BB-28) circa 1912. USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
Blazes Away 1.18k United States Navy "Blazes Away" $1,000,000 Annually in Target Practice.
American Gunners Are Tested Twice Each Year Under Conditions Reproducing Those of Battle.
Photos from the Minnesota (BB-22) & Delaware (BB-28).

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 28 April 1912, Image 21, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 1.05k THE BIG FLEET READY FOR TODAY'S REVIEW-THE SHIPS, FROM LEFT TO BIGHT, ARE:
NORTH DAKOTA (BB-29), DELAWARE (BB-28), MICHIGAN (BB-27), SOUTH CAROLINA (BB-26), LOUISIANA (BB-19), KANSAS (BB-21), VERMONT (BB-20) AND NEW HAMPSHIRE (BB-25).
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 14 October 1912, Image 14, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware67kAt Villefranche, France, circa 1913.USNHC # NH 88519.
BB-28 Delaware319k Delaware (BB-28) with what probably are Utah (BB-31) & Arkansas (BB-33) in 1913.Photo i.d. courtesy of Chuck Haberlein & Ronald J. Nash.
Library of Congress Reference number # LC-H261-3207, courtesy of Tracy White.
BB-28 Delaware181kThe smoke from a broadside of 12" guns hides two other battleships as Delaware (BB-28) fires while executing a turn to starboard, 1913. Library of Congress Reference number LC-H261-3192, courtesy of Tracy White.
BB-28 Delaware118kColor tinted stereoscopic photo by Enrique Miller Jr, circa 1913.Courtesy of Paul Petsoky.
BB-28 Delaware 738k ONE OF THE MOST REMARKABLE PHOTOGRAPHS EVER TAKEN AT SEA.
A PICTURE OF A UNITED STATES BATTLESHIP SNAPPED FROM THE DECK OF A CONSORT IN THE HEIGHT OF THE STORM OFF HAMPTON ROADS

Photo by Buck from Underwood & Underwood from N. Moser via Tommy Trampp.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 06 January 1914, LAST AND HOME EDITION, Image 5, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov. & Photo by G.V. Buck from Underwood & Underwood.
Text courtesy of N.Y. Times, 18 January 1914, Page 4, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware644k Delaware's (BB-28) bow is foamed over, most likely in a photo sequence shot with the above photo. Photo 2320353003_403d41590e_o from the collection of Anthony Kretowicz via flickr.com
BB-28 Delaware 267k Coaling ship.Photo courtesy of Tommy Trampp.
Atlantic Fleet265kA smoky Delaware (BB-28) with a broadside view of her guns, circa 1914.
In 1914 and again in 1916 Delaware cruised off Vera Cruz to protect American lives and property during the political disturbances in Mexico.
Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
Photo from "Popular Mechanics" Magazine, January 1914 via Robert Hurst.
Vera Cruz Incident
U.S. Atlantic Fleet battleships71k U.S. Atlantic Fleet battleships steaming toward Mexican waters in 1914. Photograph copyrighted in 1914 by E. Muller, Jr., and Pach.
OUR POWERFUL NORTH ATLANTIC FLEET
This is to considered be the most powerful battle fleet in the world. Recently it returned from the Mediterranean and left Hampton Roads for the south. During the last battle practice each of the vessels made a record for herself while the flagship Wyoming (BB-32) broke the world's record at target practice. The photograph shows the nine ships in the order in which they usually sail. The Wyoming is in the lead at the right, and is followed by the Florida (BB-30), Utah (BB-31), Delaware (BB-28), North Dakota (BB-29), South Carolina (BB-26), Rhode Island (BB-17), Georgia (BB-15),and New Jersey (BB-16).
The following battleships that were dispatched to Mexican waters included the:
Ohio (BB-12), Virginia (BB-13), Nebraska (BB-14), Connecticut (BB-18), Louisiana (BB-19), Vermont (BB-20), Kansas (BB-21), Minnesota (BB-22), Mississippi (BB-23), Idaho (BB-24), New Hampshire (BB-25), Michigan (BB-27), Arkansas (BB-33), New York (BB-34) & Texas (BB-35).
In insets are (left to right):
Rear Admiral Henry T. Mayo,
Rear Admiral Frank F. Fletcher,
Rear Admiral Charles J. Badger.
USNHC # NH 60322.
Insert PDF image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA.
Photo by The Madison Journal. (Tallulah, Madison Parish, La.) 1888-current, 07 February 1914, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-12 Ohio507kVERACRUZ TAKEN AFTER BOMBARDMENT
PANORAMIC VIEW OF THE STURDY FIGHTERS OF THE ATLANTIC FLEET STEAMING OUT OF HAMPTON ROADS FOR MEXICAN WATERS
LEFT TO RIGHT: THE OHIO (BB-12), THE VERMONT (BB-20), THE CONNECTICUT (BB-18), THE NORTH DAKOTA (BB-29), THE DELAWARE (BB-28), THE FLORIDA (BB-30), THE UTAH (BB-31), AND THE ARKANSAS (BB-33).
Image and text provided by University of Oregon, Knight Library; Eugene,OR.
Photo from Medford Mail Tribune. (Medford, Or.) 1909-1989, 22 April 1914, SECOND EDITION, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-12 Ohio1.33kFive Serious Charges of Inefficiency of Our Navy
The United States Ship Delaware (BB-28), the most formidable type of Dreadnought and pride of the American Navy. This type, as well as those now building, according to Mr. Isham, is so far out classed by ships of foreign nations that they are obsolete, and from a strategical standpoint "no better than floating fortresses," in which speed and armament have been sacrificed for armor plate.
Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA.
Photo from Richmond Times-Dispatch. (Richmond, Va.) 1914-current, 15 November 1914, Image 51, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware285kPostcard photo by Enrique Muller Jr. of the Delaware (BB-28) underway sometime after 1914. Photo courtesy of SK/3 Tommy Trampp.
Mid 19 Teens
BB-32 Wyoming2.57k"Ships of the Atlantic Fleet playing their searchlights at night along the Hudson River."USN photo by Underwood & Underwood, courtesy of memory.loc.gov. Text courtesy of N.Y. Times, 16 May 1915, Page 1.
BB-29 North Dakota1.22kADMIRAL FLETCHER AND FLEET CAPTAINS
Admiral Fletcher, commander of the Atlantic fleet conferring with other officers on the flagship Wyoming (BB-32). Standing with his back turned, is Capt. Albert Gleaves of the Utah (BB-31); seated, left to right, are Capt. W. L. Rogers of the Delaware (BB-28), Admiral Fletcher and Captain Huse, chief of staff.
Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA.
Photo from The Madison Journal. (Tallulah, Madison Parish, La.) 1888-current, 03 July 1915, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware 892k THE TRUTH ABOUT THE CONDITION OF OUR NAVY.
Government Records Show Only Nineteen First Class Fighting' Ships Available, All in the Atlantic.
The dreadnought Delaware (BB-28), one Uncle Sam's biggest fighters, showing her mettle in the trough of a storm.

Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 27 February 1916, Image 32 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-29 North Dakota996kGERMAN RAIDING CRUISERS ENTER BERTHS UNTIL END OF WAR
The picture shows the Prinz Eitel resting in the back channel at League Island, interned under the guns of some of the heaviest units of the U.S. Fleet. The Kronprinz Wilhelm is now tied alongside of her, following her belated arrival from Norfolk.
The Delaware (BB-28) or North Dakota (BB-29) is moored alongside of her.
Image provided by: Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo by Enrique Muller Jr, from The Evening Public Ledger, (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 3 October 1916, Image 2, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware788kShip's after three 12"/45 twin gun turrets, circa 1913.
Note: For what it is worth, it is not unknown for newspapers to submit photos taken sometime after they were first printed. It is also possible that the text in the photo caption is wrong.
Photographed by Enrique Muller. Note the sub-caliber spotting rifles mounted on the barrel of each heavy gun, gun sight practice gear fitted across the top front of each turret, and whaleboat swung out on davits.
Though it is important for every gun crew to practice firing their guns with actual live ammo, the one ton shells of the main battery are a bit too expensive to use for all gunnery practice the gunnery divisions need. These small caliber guns were strapped to each gun barrel and fired at the targets to judge the proficiency the pointer and trainers without the expenditure of actual shells and powder. The ammunition handlers would run timed dry loading practice.
Photo by E. Mueller Jr., contributed by Roy C. Thomas.
Partial text courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
PDF image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1916-1920, 22 July 1917, Section 4 Pictorial Magazine, Image 35, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Over There
1917 - 1919

Atlantic Fleet58k"Armor piercing shells weighing half a ton or more apiece being loaded on an American Dreadnought that is preparing to sail for European waters."Photo by Central News Photo Service .
Text courtesy of N.Y. Times, Page 363 from The War of the Nations (New York), 31 December 1919, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York350k New York (BB-34) with seven other Battleships of the Atlantic Fleet at Hampton Roads, 1917.
The ship in the foreground (first from the right) is the Arkansas (BB-33). The photo shows a total of 8 battleships sailing in 2 columns. The cage masts of a battleship is showing above the Arkansas' forward turrets and the ship on the far left is actually 2 ships (3 masts) [the right hand of these 2 appears to be bow on to the camera sailing on a different bearing thus only one mast is showing].
Given the probable date of the photo, the flag on the foremast of Arkansas is probably that of R. Adm. Winslow, which would suggest that the right hand column is probably Battleship Division 1.
The New York does appear in the photo as the second ship in the right hand column (second closest in the photo) note the 2 forward case-mate guns (verses 1 on 12" gunned BB's) and the 2 gun main turrets.
Assuming the the right hand column is division 1, the next 2 ships in that column would be Utah (BB-31) and the Florida (BB-30)(both funnels are between the masts) and the last ship in line (the bow on ship) may be Delaware (BB-28).
Library of Congress photo # LC-DIG-hec-08103 courtesy of the Harris & Ewing Collection.
Photo i.d. & text courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-28 & 30111kView from the Delaware (BB-28) of the Florida (BB-30) about to engage in firing practice in the Southern drill grounds, possibly at Hampton Roads Virginia prior to their sailing as part of the U.S. Navy's Battleship Division Nine to England, November 1917.
Note arrangement of masts and funnels. On a Florida (BB-30 / 31) they are Mast, Funnel, Funnel & Mast and on a Delaware (BB-28 / 29) they would be Mast, Funnel, Mast & Funnel. The ship in the foreground could be a Delaware with the photographer standing on the starboard 02 deck between the foremast and the wet 5"/51 which is presumably is trained out board. The gun barrels in the left foreground would belong to the No. 1 & No. 2 Turrets trained to starboard.
Photo courtesy of Larry Yungk. Photo I.d. & text courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-28 Delaware185kA partially camouflaged bow adorns the Delaware (BB-28), circa 1917-19.USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-34, 32, 30 & 28.95k"Arrival of the American Fleet at Scapa Flow, 7 December 1917." Oil on canvas by Bernard F. Gribble, depicting the U.S. Navy's Battleship Division Nine being greeted by British Admiral David Beatty and the crew of HMS Queen Elizabeth. Ships of the American column are (from front) New York (BB-34), Wyoming (BB-32), Florida (BB-30) and Delaware (BB-28).Courtesy of the U.S. Navy Art Collection, Washington, D.C. USNHC # NH 58841-KN.
BB-28 Delaware199k This rare oil painting by American artist Burnell Poole, "The 6th Battle Squadron of the Grand Fleet Leaving the Firth of Forth", is one of less than two dozen paintings owned by the Navy that depicts U.S. naval operations in World War One (WWI). After years of being considered a total loss by Navy Art Gallery curators it has been restored to near perfect condition. The entire process took several months, but the result is the total recovery of a painting that is sure to establish Burnell Poole's name among the best marine painters of the early 20th century.
The composition of the ships of the 6th Battle Squadron during their operational history, appearing in the painting in no particular order were: Delaware (BB-28), Florida (BB-30),Wyoming (BB-32), Arkansas (BB-33), New York (BB-34), Texas (BB-35), & Arizona (BB-39).
Photo and partial text courtesy of Naval Historical Center, Washington, D.C., File photo # N-0000X-001.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 09 June 1918, Image 36, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-32/33405kThe strongest navy afloat.
Above - The Delaware (BB-28) and the Arkansas (BB-33) under the big 12-inch guns of the Florida (BB-30). Right: The signal bridge of the North Dakota (BB-29). Left, One of the searchlight towers on the New York (BB-34).
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 30 December 1917, Image 47, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware95kCrewmen exercising on the quarterdeck, while she was stationed in British waters with the Sixth Battle Squadron, 1918.USNHC # NH 89157.
BB-28 Delaware129kIn British waters, while serving with the Sixth Battle Squadron in the North Sea area, 1918. Location is probably the Firth of Forth, Scotland.USNHC # NH 54664.
BB-28 Delaware372k Delaware's (BB-28) crew getting ready for Saturday night during the day, while in Europe.US National Archives photo # 80G-11158 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-28 Delaware141kThe Delaware (BB-28) at Rosyth, Scotland, circa 1918. Imperial War Museum photo contributed by Robert Hurst. Photo taken from U.S. Warships of World War One, by P.H. Silverstone.
BB-28 Delaware122kMost dreadnought & pre-dreadnought battleships were armed with torpedo tubes as well as guns. This photo shows a side - loading torpedo tube aboard the Delaware (BB-28) circa 1918. Torpedoes were transported along the monorail above the tube and then lowered into it. Orders to the crew to fire were delivered through the speaking tube. It was generally conceded that torpedoes were an extremely effective weapon but that their underwater tubes were a hazard because they constituted weak points in systems of bulkheads protecting against underwater hits. For a time, therefore, U.S. designers and planners expected to move the tubes topside-where they presented a fire & explosion hazard. They were therefore, omitted from the ships reconstructed during the interwar period. Photo and text courtesy of U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
BB-34 New York382k21 November 1918 - U.S. battleships witness surrender of German High Seas fleet at Rosyth, Firth of Forth, Scotland, to U.S. and British fleets.
New York (BB-34), Arkansas (BB-33), Delaware (BB-28), Texas (BB-35), Florida (BB-30), and Wyoming (BB-32).
Text & USN photo courtesy of Pacific Battleship Center - Battleship USS Iowa via Ron Reeves.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Andy McIntosh.
BB-28 Delaware170k Delaware (BB-28), docked at the Boston Navy Yard for an overhaul, 5 December 1918. Photo courtesy of Robert Headlee.
Text courtesy of DANFS.
1919 - Scrapping
BB-30 Florida1.30kThe arrangement of the search lights and the 3" gun platforms on the crane kingposts makes the photo no earlier than 1917. The lack of traverse makings on the turrets or a range clock on the mast means early 1919 at the latest. Photo courtesy of Alan Moore.
Photo i.d. & text courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
New York Harbor46k"American dreadnoughts & super-dreadnoughts steaming into New York harbor 14 April 1919."
The Texas (BB-35) leads the procession with a airplane on her turret catapult. Note the escorting biplane.
The "escorting" aircraft is either a Curtis HS-1 or HS-2 (note the single engine) can't tell which from the photo. The aircraft on a fly-off platform atop the No. 2 turret of the Texas is 1 of 6 Sopwith Camels purchased from Britain at the end of the war.
The platforms were a British concept designed to provide the fleet with an aircraft capable of reaching the high flying Zeppelins which the German Navy occasionally used as scouts. The Texas was the only US Battleship to be fitted with turret fly-off platforms while in Europe and was the test bed for this program in the US Navy. Not visible in this view is a stripped down (No fabric and no wings) Sopwith 1-1/2 Strutter lashed atop the No. 3 Turret. The platforms were eventually mounted on all 14" gun BB's through the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class (with mixed reviews from their commanders) and carried either a Hanriot HD-1 or a Neiuport 28. Though equipped inflatable floats for water landings, this tended to do a lot of damage not the least of which was dowsing a hot engine in cold salt water. By 1920 a successful compressed air catapult was developed and were being mounted on the aft deck of all 4 turreted battleships and fly-off platforms were removed. The Texas and New York (BB-34), because of their 5 Turrets, lacked the deck space for the catapult and had to make do with a float plane (Vought VE-7) sitting on the aft deck which would be launched by lowering it over the side for a surface take-off.
If you look carefully at the 12th photo from the bottom on the New York 1919 - 1926 page, you see the VE-7 on the deck and the A-frame hoist used for handling it.
Photo by Paul Thompson; text courtesy of N.Y. Times 31 December 1919, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
Atlantic  Fleet975kHow the Atlantic Fleet looked to the camera man in a seaplane flying over lower Manhattan a week ago yesterday morning as the mighty armada came up the bay to anchorage in the Hudson off Riverside Drive for a two weeks' vacation after months of strenuous maneuvers in Southern waters. The destroyers Dale (DD-290) and Flusser (DD-289) are shown leading the column of eight dreadnoughts: Oklahoma (BB-37), Nevada (BB-36), Arizona (BB-39), flagship Pennsylvania (BB-38), Utah (BB-31), Florida (BB-30), North Dakota (BB-29) and Delaware (BB-28) past the Statue of Liberty at a fifteen-knot clip. In addition to the big battleships, the fleet includes thirty-two destroyers, numerous supply ships and several submarines.
The Atlantic battleship fleet is home again. Here are the twelve great first line fighting ships that are paying Father Knickerbocker a two weeks' visit. Over a hundred of Uncle Sam's grim sea warriors gray the North River, while their 30,000 sailor-men are given the freedom of the city in a royal welcome home.
The Battleship Mississippi (BB-41) leading the fleet into the harbor, as photographed from an airplane. Note the airplanes atop the forward and aft turrets.
Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 20 April 1919, Image 48, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware70k Delaware (BB-28) underway, 1919.USN photo courtesy of Larry Bonn.
Atlantic  Fleet1.84kVICTORY FLEET COMES BACK FROM CUBAN WATERS
One hundred and twelve vessels of the victory fleet have returned from target practice in Cuban waters. All of New York's harbor craft turned out to greet the sea fighters. The photograph shows in the foreground the Delaware (BB-28) following the fleet into the harbor.
Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN.
Photo from The Bemidji Daily Pioneer. (Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, 29 April 1919, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware190kStarboard bow view on 1 January 1920, at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.National Archives photo # 19-N-28-29-4.
BB-28 Delaware65kFiring her 12"/45 main battery guns during battle practice, 26 June 1920.USNHC # NH 60569.
BB-28 Delaware154k The crew of the Delaware (BB-28) crowd the deck as she passes through the Pedro Miguel Locks at the Panama Canal, 20 January 1921.USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Atlantic  Fleet188k Delaware (BB-28) in 1921. US National Archives photo # 80G-1035090 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-28 Delaware109kThe Delaware (BB-28) in 1921, a line drawing by A.L. Raven. Photo and text courtesy of U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
BB-30 Florida88k Florida (BB-30) steaming in line abreast with two other ships of Battleship Division FIVE, Atlantic Fleet, during an exercise in about 1921. The other ships are Delaware (BB-28) and North Dakota (BB-29). Photographed by A.E. Wells. USNHC # NH 93421.
Atlantic and Pacific Fleets49k"Combined Atlantic and Pacific Fleets in Panama Bay, 21st January 1921". Right section (of three) of a panoramic photograph taken by M.C. Mayberry, of Mayberry and Smith, Shreveport, Louisiana.
Among the ships present in this image are (from left to right): Sicard (DD-346), Hatfield (DD-231), North Dakota (BB-29), Delaware (BB-28), Brazos (AO-4), Prometheus (AR-3), Utah (BB-31), Oklahoma (BB-37), Bridge (AF-1), Nevada (BB-36), Schenck (DD-159), Arizona (BB-39), Black Hawk (AD-9), Dickerson (DD-157), Dahlgren (DD-187), Herbert (DD-160), Columbia (CA-16), Cleveland (PG-33), Tacoma (PG-32), Semmes (DD-189) and one other destroyer.
Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation, D.H. Criswell Collection. Photo # NH 86082-C, courtesy of Naval Historical Center.
BB-28 Delaware83kCAPT. Robert Whitehead McNelly was the commanding officer of the battleship Delaware (BB-28) from 12 December 1921 to 1922. Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
BB-30 Florida663kRotogravure Photo entitled Mighty American Dreadnoughts Under Full Power Plowing through Turbulent Waters Off The Coast of Scotland
Florida (BB-30) with other vessels of the Naval Academy practice squadron running into rough weather while passing to the North of Scotland while en route from Copenhagen to Glasgow.

She is followed by Delaware (BB-28) and North Dakota (BB-29).
Rotogravure Photo courtesy of ebay.co.uk.
USNHC Photo # NH 54181 and text.
Atlantic  Fleet974kRIVERSIDE DRIVE under the big guns. An unusual view of the famous drive between two of the monster guns on board the battleship Delaware (BB-28) anchored in the North River. Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 19 September 1922, HOME FINAL EDITION, Image 13, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-28 Delaware819kPanoramic photo of the U.S. fleet in Panama Bay (Pacific entrance to the Panama Canal) on 1 March 1923. 70 vessels are viewed; the Battle Fleet consists of all U.S. battleships from the Delaware (BB-28) through the Idaho (BB-42). Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, courtesy of Tom Kermen. Copyright R.G. Lewis, Y Photo Shop, Balboa, C.Z."
BB-30 Florida121k Florida (BB-30) entering Halifax harbor, Nova Scotia in 1923. She is followed by two other U.S. Navy battleships.
The other two battleships might be the Delaware (BB-28) & North Dakota (BB-29). DANFS records that they made midshipmen cruises to Europe during that time before they were decommissioned later in the fall.
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 54180.
BB-28 Delaware127kIn dry dock at the South Boston Annex, Boston Navy Yard, Massachusetts, on 30 January 1924. The ship has been stripped in preparation for scrapping. Note propellers, rudder, armor belt and heavy fouling on her underwater hull.USNHC # NH 54675.
BB-28 Delaware427kIn dry dock at the South Boston Annex, Boston Navy Yard, Massachusetts, on 30 January 1924. Delaware (BB-28) being scrapped.Photo courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via flickr.com.
BB-28 Delaware 326k In dry dock at the South Boston Annex, Boston Navy Yard, Massachusetts, on 30 January 1924.
Delaware's (BB-28) cage mast on her side.
At work on her gun deck.
Photo courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via flickr.com.
BB-28 Delaware405k Delaware (BB-28) dismantled in dry dock.Photos courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via flickr.com.
BB-28 Delaware308k Delaware (BB-28) going to junk pile, passing Old Glory as it waves on the stern of Leviathan at South Boston.Photos courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via flickr.com.
BB-28 Delaware490kScrapping the 12-Inch guns of the Delaware (BB-28) at South Boston Annex, Boston Navy Yard, Massachusetts, April, 1924.USN photo courtesy of USNI & submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-28 Delaware98k Delaware (BB-28), January 1925, in Philadelphia being scrapped under the terms of the Washington Naval Treaty.USNI / USN.
(NISMF)926kA guest studies a painting depicting the history of battleships. The artwork was painted by George Skybeck and presented to the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association during their annual banquet at Honolulu, Hawaii, on 8 December 1991. USN photo # DN-SC-92-05391, by PHC Carolyn Harris, courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil, Defense Visual Information Center.

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