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NavSource Online: Battleship Photo Archive

BB-34 USS NEW YORK

Radio Call Sign: November - Alpha - Delta - Tango


New York Class Battleship: Displacement 27,000 Tons, Dimensions, 573' (oa) x 95' 3" x 29' 7" (Max). Armament 10x 14"/45 21 x 5"/51, 56 x 4 x 21" tt. Armor, 12" Belt, 14" Turrets, 3" Decks, 12" Conning Tower. Machinery, 28,100 IHP; Vertical, triple expansion engines, 2 screws
Speed, 21 Knots, Crew 1052.

Operational and Building Data: Laid down by New York Naval Ship Yard, September 11, 1911. Launched October 30, 1912. Commissioned April 15, 1914. Decommissioned August 29, 1946. Stricken July 13, 1948.
Fate: Target During Atomic Bomb Tests, Bikini Atoll, Marshall Islands. Sunk, 40 miles off Oahu, July 8, 1948, by Naval Gunfire and Aircraft.
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SizeImage DescriptionContributed
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Keel Laying / Commissioning
1911 - 1914

BB-35 Texas1.07kNEW YORK AND TEXAS NAMES
OF TWO NEW BATTLESHIPS

Washington, December 16. New York and Texas are the names of the two new battleships authorized at the last session of congress. Texas will be the name of the vessel which, as provided by the last naval bill, will be constructed by a private contractor while the New York dreadnought will be built by the government at the New York navy yard. This selection of names for the two most powerful vessels in the United States navy, which was made by Secretary of the Navy Meyer, will necessitate the changing of the designations of two warships already in commission, for at present there is the Texas, a second class battleship, which will be renamed San Marcos in honor of a city of Texas. Her displacement is only 6,315 tons, while the new Texas will be of 27,000 tons displacement. The present cruiser New York will be rechristened the Manhattan. The New Hampshire (BB-25), (pictured) one of the crack ships of Uncle Sam's navy, will be a dwarf beside the New York and the Texas. The two new battleships will be nearly 10,000 tons heavier.
Image and text provided by University of Florida.
Photo from the The Pensacola Journal. (Pensacola, Fla.) 1898-1985, 17 December 1910, Image 6, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34460kLaunching Ways of the New York (BB-34), Monthly Progress Photo, Looking North, Yard Labor, 1 June 1911.
What looks to be the Ohio (BB-12) is in the left distance.
National Archives Identifier: 6038403
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
Photo added 07/25/17.
BB-34/35730kWorld's Greatest Guns On New U.S. battleships Will Make Naval Warfare Inconceivably Dreadful Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo from the The Salt Lake Tribune. (Salt Lake City, Utah) 1890-current, 17 September 1911, MAGAZINE SECTION, Image 51, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 1.25k The beginning of a dreadnought.
W. P. Cluverius, Jr., son of Lt. Commander W, P. Cluverius, U. S. N. and grandson of Admiral Sampson, fastening the first bolt in the keel plate of the battleship New York (BB-34).
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo by The New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 12 September 1911, Image 4, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York741kNew United States Battleship Utah (BB-31), The Navy's Greatest Sea Fighter, Now Receiving Finishing Touches, and Her Immense Twelve-Inch Guns.
LAYING KEEL OF THE NEW YORK (BB-34) & SAMPSON'S GRANDSON.
Image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL.
Photo by The Cairo Bulletin. (Cairo, Ill.) 1???-1928, 18 September 1911, Image 1, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 1.20k CHILDREN LAY KEEL PLATE OF BIG BATTLESHIP
RIVETING ON THE HORSESHOE.
AT the Brooklyn navy yard recently there took place a ceremony unique in the annals of naval construction. This was the riveting of a horseshoe onto the first keel plate of the New York (BB-34), that is to be the latest, largest and most powerful of the ships of the Dreadnought class in the navy of this country. After the emblem of good luck was thus fastened in place, the keel plate, nominally with the assistance of the children was lowered to its assigned postilion on the frame of the ship and riveted there. The sturdy little chaps who participated in the ceremony were all the children of naval officers or attaches of the yard. The picture shows one of them taking his turn with the hammer and driving a rivet through its appointed hole in the horseshoe and the white keel plate beneath.
Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA.
Photo by Tensas Gazette. (St. Joseph, La.) 1886-current, 10 November 1911, Image 10, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York182kKeel of the New York (BB-34). Digital ID:# ggbain 09583, LC-B2-2267-13. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection, courtesy of Tom Kermen.
BB-34 New York879kKeel of the New York (BB-34). Digital ID:# ggbain 09517, LC-B2-2248-7. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection, via flickr.com/photos/library_of_congress.
BB-34 New York155kThe New York (BB-34) rises above her scaffolding at New York Naval Ship Yard sometime in 1912. Digital ID: # ggbain 12234. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
BB-34 New York 2.38k How $10,000,000 Battleship New York (BB-34) Looks In the Course of Construction. Image and text provided by Minnesota Historical Society; Saint Paul, MN.
Photo by The Bemidji Daily Pioneer.(Bemidji, Minn.) 1904-1971, 05 August 1912, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York268kDiver going down before Battleship New York (BB-34) was launched, 25 September 1912.
Note that the battleship in the photo is not the New York.
Courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via flickr.com.
BB-34 New York957kProduct of the New Order in Warship Building is the Mighty New York (BB-34)
The Meyer System, Favored bv Mr. Taft and Which Puts Real Naval Warriors in Charge of Battleship Construction, Has Been Applied to the Huge Craft Now Being Built at the Brooklyn Navy Yard.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo courtesy of New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 22 September 1912, Image 21, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-342.32kBrooklyn Navy Yard: 6 photo PDF of the Setting the Rudder of the New York (BB-34), 15 October 1912.
In 1st photograph the rudder, prior to be setting into position, is shown on the deck of the crane Hercules.
National Archives Identifier: 6038125
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
BB-34 New York145kView of the New York (BB-34) showing her propeller-less stems from her stern.Digital ID:# ggbain 10835, LC-B2-2445-12, / 2387991140_5a3f6ff6d7_o. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection, courtesy of Tom Kermen.
PDf Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH.
Photo by The Democratic Banner. (Mt. Vernon, Ohio) 1898-192?, 25 October 1912, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York268k New York (BB-34) before launch.
Note that the battleship in the background is not the New York.
Digital ID:# ggbain 10716v, LC-B2-2435-8. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection, courtesy of Tom Kermen.
BB-34 New York2.47k New York (BB-34) christened on 30 October 1912, at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, New York City, New York. Detroit Photographic Company. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. Photo # Lot 3000-S-7 from the National Museum of the U.S. Navy via flickr.com.
BB-34 New York604kGIRL IS UNABLE TO SMASH BOTTLE AT BIG LAUNCHING
Dock Worker Comes Rescue And Dreadnought Leaves The Ways.
Super-Dreadnought Launched Today, and Girls Who Took Part in Christening
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC. & The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo by The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 30 October 1912, LAST EDITION, Image 3, & The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, 04 October 1912, Image 11, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34515kStringer Raised for Riveting, Starboard Side of the Ship, 21 October 1912.National Archives Identifier: 6038136
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
BB-34 New York1.00kPresident Taft & Sec. of Navy Henry Lewis Stimson at the Sponsor's stand during the launching of the New York (BB-34), 30 October 1912.Photo No. f1003n2700, Brooklyn Navy Yard Archive - courtesy National Archive and Records Administration, Northeast Region - NYC, Record Group 181 via flickr.com.
BB-34 New York1.24k New York (BB-34) on the launch, 30 October 1912, at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, New York City, New York. The ship's sponsor was Elsie Calder, the daughter of New York politician William M. Calder. Detroit Photographic Company. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. Photo # Lot 3000-S-11 from the National Museum of the U.S. Navy via flickr.com.
BB-34 New York2.49k New York (BB-34) going down the ways on 30 October 1912, at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, New York City, New York. Detroit Photographic Company. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. Photo # Lot 3000-S-10 from the National Museum of the U.S. Navy via flickr.com.
BB-34 New York1.20k New York (BB-34) leaving the ways on 30 October 1912.Photo No. f1003n2704, Brooklyn Navy Yard Archive - courtesy National Archive and Records Administration, Northeast Region - NYC, Record Group 181 via flickr.com.
BB-34 New York974kA many hatted crowd; Naval officers with fore & aft, Bowler hatted men & plumed ladies in their finery watch as the New York (BB-34) enters the water on 30 October 1912.Photo No. f1003n2703, Brooklyn Navy Yard Archive - courtesy National Archive and Records Administration, Northeast Region - NYC, Record Group 181 via flickr.com.
BB-34 New York252kThe New York (BB-34) at the end of the ways; spectators reach new heights to get a view of the proceedings on 30 October 1912.USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-34 New York1.19k New York (BB-34) is waterborne on 30 October 1912, at the Brooklyn Navy Yard, New York City, New York Detroit Photographic Company. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. Photo # Lot 3000-S-9 from the National Museum of the U.S. Navy via flickr.com.
BB-34 New York 1.01k GREATEST OF WORLD'S SEA FIGHTERS LAUNCHED AT BROOKLYN NAVY YARD
Super-Dreadnought New York (BB-34)Takes to Water in Presence of Distinguished Gathering, Including President Taft and Other Officials. Description of New Vessel
Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA.
Photo by The Times Dispatch. (Richmond, Va.) 1903-1914, 31 October 1912, Image 8, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 435k Bow view of the new battleship New York (BB-34) and Her Sponsor, Miss Elsie F. Calder. Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo by The Logan Republican. (Logan, Utah) 1902-1924, 09 November 1912, Image 3 & The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 11 November 1917, Image 5 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 1.35k AT THE LAUNCHING OF THE BATTLESHIP NEW YORK (BB-34)
FROM left to right President Taft, Secretary of the Navy, Geo. von L. Meyer, Miss Elsie Calder, who christened the battleship, and Miss Kathleen Fitzgerald, who acted as flower girl.
Image and text provided by University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.
Photo from Daily Public Ledger.(Maysville, Ky.) 1892-191?, 23 November 1912, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 652k LAUNCHING OF A $6,000,000 BATTLESHIP
FIFTY
thousand people, among them President Taft and other notables saw the launching of the New York (BB-34), the latest and greatest of the battleships of the American navy, at Brooklyn. When the vessel goes into commission in twelve or fourteen months it will have cost about $6,000,000.
Image and text provided by University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY.
Photo by The Breckenridge News. (Cloverport, Ky.) 1876-1955, 27 November 1912, Image 7, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 521k Ammunition on New York (BB-34), 14" shells. Photo # LC-B2-3038-1 & text from George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress) via flickr.com.
BB-34 New York2.10kLoading Super-Dreadnought New York (BB-34).
Taking aboard supplies at the New York Navy Yard preparatory to going into commission for sea duty.
Photo by Underwood & Underwood from "Our Navy", published by the L.H. Nelson Co., Portland, Maine in 1917, courtesy of David Johnston (USNR).
BB-34 New York 1.06k How far can ships roll with safety.
Father Neptune Has Been Pushing Transatlantic Liners Almost to the Limit of Their Hurricane Resistance in the Last Few Weeks, but Scientific Construction Has Triumphed Over the Rage of Wind and Wave.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 26 January 1913, Image 17, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Crane Hercules696kCrane Hercules, Lifting Turret Number 2, New York (BB-34), From Shore to Deck, Shown Swinging Clear, Weight 220,000 Pounds, 8 May 1913.National Archives Identifier: 6038503
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
Crane Hercules636kCrane Hercules, with Turret Number 2, Weight 220,000 Pounds New York (BB-34)in Tow Off Ordnance Dock.National Archives Identifier: 6038504
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
Crane Hercules429kPlacing Turret Number 2, Weight 220,000 Pounds, in Position Aboard New York (BB-34), Lowering Turret National Archives Identifier: 6038505
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
BB-34 New York252kFitting out.USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-34538kPlacing Stack Aboard New York (BB-34), 2 July 1913. National Archives Identifier: 6038137
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
BB-3 Oregon 3.87k WHAT A DREADNOUGHT COULD DO--A BATTLE AT SEA TODAY WOULD BE MOST DREADFUL AFFAIR
...A dreadnought like the new battleship New York (BB-34) could sink a fleet of more than a hundred Oregon's before the Oregon's could get near enough to the New York to even hit her.
Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA.
Photo from The Tacoma Times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, 28 July 1913, Image 3, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34463k New York (BB-34) in Dry in Dock Number 4, 3 October 1913.National Archives Identifier: 6038138
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
BB-34401kBrooklyn Navy Yard: New York (BB-34) & Wyoming (BB-32) at Pier D, Looking West from Pier E, 12/19/1913. National Archives Identifier: 6038113
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
BB-34 New York 382k Postcard showing ship information of the New York class battleships, which included New York (BB-34) and Texas (BB-35). Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels Collection, USN photo # PR-06-CN-454-C6-F6-31, from the National Museum of the U.S. Navy, courtesy of flickr.com.
BB-34 New York 858k HURRY WORK ON DREADNOUGHT NEW YORK (BB-34)
The Dreadnought New York, now in the Brooklyn navy yard, New York, which is being rushed to readiness for any possible trouble with Mexico.
Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE.
Photo by Dakota County Herald. (Dakota City, Neb.) 1891-1965, 08 January 1914, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
U.S. Atlantic Fleet battleships71k U.S. Atlantic Fleet battleships steaming toward Mexican waters in 1914. Photograph copyrighted in 1914 by E. Muller, Jr., and Pach.
OUR POWERFUL NORTH ATLANTIC FLEET
This is to considered be the most powerful battle fleet in the world. Recently it returned from the Mediterranean and left Hampton Roads for the south. During the last battle practice each of the vessels made a record for herself while the flagship Wyoming (BB-32) broke the world's record at target practice. The photograph shows the nine ships in the order in which they usually sail. The Wyoming is in the lead at the right, and is followed by the Florida (BB-30), Utah (BB-31), Delaware (BB-28), North Dakota (BB-29), South Carolina (BB-26), Rhode Island (BB-17), Georgia (BB-15),and New Jersey (BB-16).
The following battleships that were dispatched to Mexican waters included the:
Ohio (BB-12), Virginia (BB-13), Nebraska (BB-14), Connecticut (BB-18), Louisiana (BB-19), Vermont (BB-20), Kansas (BB-21), Minnesota (BB-22), Mississippi (BB-23), Idaho (BB-24), New Hampshire (BB-25), Michigan (BB-27), Arkansas (BB-33), New York (BB-34) & Texas (BB-35).
In insets are (left to right):
Rear Admiral Henry T. Mayo,
Rear Admiral Frank F. Fletcher,
Rear Admiral Charles J. Badger.
USNHC # NH 60322.
Insert PDF image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA.
Photo by The Madison Journal. (Tallulah, Madison Parish, La.) 1888-current, 07 February 1914, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-39 Arizona604kKEEL LAYING OF WORLD'S BIGGEST WARSHIP, NAVAL CONSTRUCTOR AND THE NEW YORK (BB-34).
The keel of the largest battleship in the world, known officially as No. 39 of the United States navy, has been laid at the Brooklyn navy yard, and work is being pushed so as to complete the great fighter within ten months. No. 39, which will likely be christened North Carolina, is 608 feet long and 31,000 tons burden. Her main battery will consist of twelve fourteen-inch guns, two more than the New York, the latest super-dreadnought to be finished for Uncle Sam at the same yards, and which will have her trial tests within the next month. Naval Constructor Robert Stocker, who has charge of No. 39 and under whose direction the New York was built, says the Brooklyn navy yard is setting a record for battleship construction in point of time.
Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH.
Photo from The Democratic Banner. (Mt. Vernon, Ohio) 1898-192?, 20 March 1914, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York108kThe National Ensign is raised at the battleship's stern during her commissioning ceremonies, 15 April 1914, at the New York Navy Yard, Brooklyn, N.Y.USNHC # NH 83711.
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo by The Evening World. (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, 15 April 1914, Final Night, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Vera Cruz Incident
BB-34 New York727kBATTLESHIPS TEXAS (BB-35) AND NEW YORK (BB-34) GETTING READY TO SAIL FOR MEXICO
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from the The Evening World. (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, 15 April 1914, Final Night, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York2.00kUNITED STATES FLEET ON WAY TO BLOCKADE ALL PORTS OF MEXICO
LOADING SUPPLIES ON ONE OF LOUISIANA'S (BB-19) TENDERS
NEW YORK (BB-34) GOING INTO COMMISSION
CAPT. T.S. ROGERS OF THE NEW YORK
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from the The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, 16 April 1914, Image 2, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York547kSuper-Dreadnought New York (BB-34) Largest Warship in World, Recently Launched, Now is Ready for ActionImage and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI.
Photo from The Hawaiian Gazette. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii]) 1865-1918, 21 April 1914, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York713kTYPE OF GUNS THAT THREATEN HUERTA DYNASTY.
FOUR OF THE TEN 14-INCH GUNS OF THE NEW YORK (BB-34)
Which is being rushed into readiness to get under way for Mexican waters to add to the naval forces that are being mobilized off the coast of Mexico.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo by The Washington Herald., (Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, 23 April 1914, Image 6, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 527k Loading New York (BB-34), 24 April 1914. Photo # LC-B2-3055-5 & text from George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress) via flickr.com.
BB-34 New York460k Loading food on the New York (BB-34) on 24 April 1914.Source: Library of Congress, Photo No. LC-B2-3037-11 via Mike Green.
BB-34 New York 517k Bridge of New York (BB-34). Photo # LC-B2-3037-9 & text from George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress) via flickr.com.
BB-34 New York 468k Lifting launch from New York (BB-34). Photo # LC-B2-3037-2 & text from George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress) via flickr.com.
BB-34754k New York (BB-34) in the North River (Hudson River), New York. USN photo # Lot 10794-12 from the George G. Bain Collection. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, courtesy of the National Museum of the U.S. Navy via flickr.com.
BB-34401k New York (BB-34) turret and 14" guns, at the New York Navy Yard, New York, 20 April 1914. USN photo # Lot 10794-6 from the George G. Bain Collection. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, courtesy of the National Museum of the U.S. Navy via flickr.com.
BB-34 New York 1.04k SUPER-DREADNOUGHT NEW YORK (BB-34) OFF FOR VERA CRUZ.
NEW YORK SAILS IN WARTIME HASTE
Big Warship May Be Sent Through Canal to Do West Coast Duty.
AMMUNITION STREWS DECKS; TARS HAPPY
Crowds Bid Super-Dreadnought Good Voyage to Troubled Mexican Waters.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 27 April 1914, Image 3, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 534k American Marines Boarding Great Battleship New York (BB-34)Image and text provided by University of Oregon, Knight Library; Eugene, OR.
Photo by The Evening Herald. (Klamath Falls, Or.) 1906-1942, 29 April 1914, Image 4 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 1.94k NAVY'S NEWEST DREADNOUGHT TO DO SHORE WORK AT MEXICO
THE new dreadnought New York (BB-34), the Texas (BB-35) and the Wyoming (BB-32) and from ten to twelve light draught fighting vessels, under the command of Rear Admiral Cameron M. Winslow, are to be organized into a special squadron for shore work in Mexican waters. The New York will be the flagship of the squadron. Herewith is shown the New York, strewn with ammunition for its big 14-inch suns. These are the first 14-inch guns made.
Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota.
Photo by Bismarck Daily Tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, 01 May 1914, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 655k SCENE AT NAVY YARD BEFORE WORLD'S GREATEST BATTLESHIP LEAVES FOR MEXICO
This picture was taken at the Brooklyn navy yard just before the giant new battleship New York (BB-34) left for Mexican waters last Sunday. From the mainmast of this vessel flies the flag of Rear Admiral Winslow, commander of the new special service squadron. The New York which was put in commission only two or three weeks ago, is the world's greatest battleship.
Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo by The Ogden Standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, 02 May 1914, 4 P.M. City Edition, Image 9, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 456k Greatest American Dreadnought and Her Admiral Sail for Mexico
The greatest battleship ever built in the United States, one of the very greatest in the world, the New York (BB-34), just placed in commission, has gone to Vera Cruz on the first voyage she has ever taken. In fact, the engines of the great vessel had never moved her till they started her on the journey to Vera Cruz.....
Image and text provided by University of Oregon, Knight Library; Eugene, OR.
Photo by The Evening Herald. (Klamath Falls, Or.) 1906-1942, 04 May 1914, Image 4 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 598k Views of Battleship New York (BB-34), Greatest In World, and Captain.
The battleship New York, which recently went into service and which, with its sister ship, the Texas (BB-35), is the greatest battleship in the world in actual commission, was prepared to take part in the Mexican situation. The top picture in the illustration shows tbe flag raising on the New York at the time it was put into service. The lower view shows two of the great fourteen inch guns on the New York. Both the New York and the Texas carry this size caliber of cannon. They are the only battleships of the world thus equipped. Captain Thomas S. Rodgers of the New York is also shown.
Photos by American Press Association.
Image and text provided by University of Oregon Libraries; Eugene, OR.
Photo by Daily Capital Journal.(Salem, Or.) 1903-1919, 06 May 1914, Image 1 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York145kA Navy Yard locomotive [0-4-0T switcher, possibly an H. K. Porter, one of seven produced for the US Navy in World War I] and freight cars are among the busy port scenes on display as the New York (BB-34) sits pier side nine days after being commissioned, 24 April 1914. Digital ID:# ggbain 15879v, LC-B2-3037-14. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection.
Text i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore.
BB-34 New York49k New York (BB-34) shortly after commissioning.USN photo courtesy of Robert Hurst.
BB-34 New York 719k DREADNOUGHT NEW YORK (BB-34) MAKES GOOD ON BELATED TRIAL TRIP
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo by The Washington Herald. (Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, 28 October 1914, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Mid 19 Teens
BB-34 New York 530k Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels, Consulting Board and Party on visit to New York (BB-34), circa World War I. Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels Collection, USN photo # PR-06-CN-454-C5-F1-1 from the National Museum of the U.S. Navy, courtesy of flickr.com.
BB-34 New York176kShip's company lines the deck of the New York (BB-34) in this mid teens broadside photo. USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-34 New York 1.35k AS THE NEW YORK (BB-34) WOULD APPEAR IN ACTUAL BATTLE
The above reproduction of a painting by Burnell Poole depicts the United States super-dreadnought New York, the most powerful fighting unit in the world, as she would appear leading a fleet into action at full speed under a forced draught and firing a broadside salvo of her ten 14 inch rifles. The picture is unusual because it shows as far as it is possible, the actual conditions existing during the opening of a naval engagement, when the ship is absolutely cleared for action, all boats having been put adrift, and flying the national ensign at all peaks, which is traditional in the service. When in target practice Uncle Sam's battleships never entirely clear ship, nor do they fly the ensigns.
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Sun. (New York, N.Y.) (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, 10 January 1915, FOURTH SECTION PICTORIAL MAGAZINE, Image 43, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York434k New York (BB-34) at Navy Yard, N.Y. on 15 January 1915.Photo courtesy of Library of Congress, # LC-F82-1570 via Mike Green.
BB-34 New York2.91k"The fighting top of the New York (BB-34) photographed from the Manhattan Bridge as she steamed past for the Southern Drill Grounds and the formal opening of the Panama Canal." Photo by American Press Assn.
Text courtesy of N.Y. Times, 24 January 1915, Page 1, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York113k THE SUPER-DREADNOUGHT NEW YORK (BB-34) UNITED STATES NAVY, ON HER TRIAL TRIP OFF THE MAINE COAST
The making of this photograph endangered the life of the photographer. Mr. F. Muller. Jr who specializes in portraits of the beauties in Uncle Sam's navy. Mr. Muller and his companions were in a small power-boat which raced ahead of the New York while the great ship was tearing through the water at twenty-five knots speed. At an opportune time, when the battleship was almost upon them, the small boat was turned at right angles to her course. The engine stopped for a moment of stability, and the picture snapped. Then came a breath-holding period while the engine was being started again, and with a bare margin of a second the small boat scrambled to safety while the giant war machine rushed by, about seventy-five yards away.
The New York is the greatest unit in the sea forces of the United States, and until the coming of the British super dreadnought Queen Elizabeth was the greatest in the world. She is 573 feet long, and of 95 feet extreme breadth: her displacement is over 28.000 tons, and her engines of about 30,000 horsepower. The New York's main armament consists of ten 14-inch guns and four submerged 21-inch torpedo tubes. The battleship's guaranteed speed is 21 knots, but her maximum is far above that figure. The New York cost $14.000.000.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 28 March 1915. Image 47, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York1.80kTHE INVASION OF AMERICA
Fire control station on top of mast on United States battleship
Loading 14 inch shells on the dreadnought New York (BB-34).
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from the The Sun. (New York [N.Y.] 1833-1916, 28 March 1915, FIFTH SECTION, Page 3, Image 51, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 1.97k UNCLE SAM'S SUBMARINES DRAW KEEN INTEREST OF SUNDAY CROWDS; CURIOUS ABOUT TORPEDOES
Sunday sightseers going on board the super-dreadnought New York (BB-34). Looking up the river from the aft deck of the New York, three of the big fighters of the fleet, the Texas (BB-35), Delaware (BB-28) and the North Dakota (BB-29), can be seen.
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo by The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, 10 May 1915, Image 14, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic Fleet250k OUTLINED AGAINST A CURTAIN OF DARKNESS
A fleet of destroyers and torpedo-boats has now arrived at New York to join the heavy ships of the line. Altogether, about 50 vessels will be assembled when the ceremonies began next Monday. It is promised that the strained international relations will have no effect on the parade.
Photo by International News Service.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo & text by Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 13 May 1915, Night Extra, Image 16, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 977k Super-dreadnought New York (BB-34).
No battleship in the German navy equals either of these great superdreadnoughts of the American navy, now assembled in the Hudson River. In fact, they are surpassed by no vessels in the world except the five recently turned out by the British admiralty, among which is the Queen Elizabeth now in the Dardanelles.
They are only part of the fleet of sixteen battleships in the Hudson River. But the American navy has more, for there are the Pennsylvania (BB-38),just launched, the Arizona (BB-39) about to be launched, and the California (BB-44), in course of construction.
The Texas (BB-35) and the New York are of 27,000 tons displacement. Each carries ten 14-inch guns for her main battery, and twenty-one 5-inch rifles for protection against torpedo attack.
As an illustration of their rate of fire it is a matter of record that one of these pieces had three shells in air at the same time, one missile having whizzed through the target and still in flight, another cutting through the canvas screen just as the third shell was leaving the gun.
What the 14-inch gun can do was recently demonstrated by William Ruf, one of the gun pointers on the Texas, who in the practice held off the Virginia Capes, broke the world's record, making six straight hits at a moving target being towed fourteen miles distant. Previously the Arkansas (BB-33), sister ship to the Wyoming (BB-32), had made six hits out of six shots from a 12-inch rifle in the incredibly short time of fifty-seven seconds.
Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC.
Photo by The Intelligencer. (Anderson, S.C.) 1915-1917, 15 May 1915, Image 1, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 951k BOY SCOUTS PERCHED ON THE GUNS OF THE DREADNOUGHT NEW YORK (BB-34) Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 16 May 1915, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-32 Wyoming626kUNCLE SAM'S FLEET AT NEW YORK
Views Taken From Flagship Wyoming (BB-32).
The river scene below shows the anchored battleships swinging in the tide, the New York (BB-34) in the foreground.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo by The Washington Herald. (Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, 16 May 1915, PICTORIAL SECTION, Image 27 courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York463kNaval Fleet Review, at New York City, New York, 18 May 1915. View from the deck of the New York (BB-34).Photo # 19-N-27-17-22 from the National Museum of the U.S. Navy via flickr.com.
BB-34 New York196kStarboard quarter view of the New York (BB-34) circa 1915-16. Note the absence of her two bow 5"/51 guns.USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
BB-34 New York91k Early teens post card of the New York (BB-34) passing through New York's East River. Photo courtesy of Omar Rubido, & submitted by Fabio Pena.
BB-34 New York4.38k"New York (BB-34) returning to this city a week ago from for the Southern Drill Grounds. From one of the most remarkable photographs ever taken of a warship in the open sea, showing every foot of her deck."Photo by E. Muller, Jr. contributed by Roy C. Thomas from the book, "The United States Navy" published in 1919.
Original text from N.Y. Times, 31 October 1915, Page 8.
BB-34 New York1.83kCoaling a battleship at sea.
The ship is the New York (BB-34). (The "4" on the bell could be either BB-34 or 1914, the year of commissioning.) The curved turret roofs indicate one or the 14" 45 cal gunned ships while the low turret adjacent to the base of the cage mainmast eliminates the Nevada's and Pennsylvania's. The Texas (BB-35) had the searchlight tops on her boat cranes from prior to commissioning, so she is eliminated. That leaves just the New York, sometime prior to 1916 by which time she had AA platforms atop her cranes.
Photographer: Brown & Dawson.
National Archives Identifier: 45510242
Local Identifier: 165-WW-322C-001
Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard M. Jensen.
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
BB-34 New York1.92kBATTLESHIP CREW HOST TO CHILDREN
Sailors of the battleship New York (BB-34) serving the dinner they provided out of their own money to about one hundred children who were their guests on the big fighting ship yesterday. Capt. Hugh Rodman is standing behind Santa Claus.
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from the The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, 26 December 1915, Image 6, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York383kThe North Pole comes to New York (BB-34), 26 December 1915.
Notice the unique fire control system above the top turret.
USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-34 New York 1.94k BIG GUNS OF BATTLESHIP NEW YORK (BB-34) SHOWN AS THEY APPEARED IN THE TARGET PRACTICE DURING RECENT WINTER MANOEUVRES Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo by The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, 07 February 1916, Image 12, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-32 Wyoming467kEUGENIC BABE'S MOTHER
Mr & Mrs Herbert Van Loan, who were married on 17 May 1915 on board the New York (BB-34), in the North river, by permission of secretary of the navy Daniels are being congratulated on the birth of a baby girl, Genevieve. The marriage of Mr. & Mrs Van Loan received much publicity, not only because it was celebrated on a battleship with Admiral Mayo among the witnesses, but also because a prominent physician of St. Louis had pronounced bride and bridegroom physically perfect and their marriage ideal from a eugenic viewpoint.
Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX.
Photo by El Paso Herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, 22 February 1916, HOME EDITION, Image 8 courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 568k WHAT GIANT SEA FIGHTER LOOKS LIKE UNDER THE SHADOW OF NEW YORK'S SKYSCRAPERS
The latest view of New York' skyline shows the New York (BB-34) steaming down the East River on its way to speed trial at Hampton Roads. The photograph, taken from the Brooklyn side of the Brooklyn Bridge, shows, at the extreme left, the Bankers' Trust Building, then the new Equitable Life Building, the Singer Building, the Park Row Building, the Woolworth Building, and at the extreme right, the New York World Building.
Photo by Underwood & Underwood.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo by Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 14 November 1916, Night Extra, Image 18 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York1.05k"DR. David Jayne Hill, former Ambassador to Germany, on behalf of the American Defense Society. Presenting to Captain Charles F. Hughes, of the super dreadnought New York (BB-34), the Defense Society's trophy for the highest score in big gun and torpedo practice." Photographer: Western Newspaper Union.
National Archives Identifier: 45510234
Local Identifier: 165-WW-322B-12
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
BB-34 New York 735k BATTLESHIP FLEET ARRIVING FOR FOOTBALL GAME
PENNSYLVANIA (BB-38) LEADS SEVEN BATTLESHIPS IN

Superdreadnought Goes to Navy Yard, but Others Anchor Off the Drive.
Advance guard of the Atlantic fleet as it steamed up New York Day to-day. The ships are in the following order: New York (BB-34), Texas (BB-35), Oklahoma (BB-37), Connecticut (BB-18), Florida (BB-30), Utah (BB-31) and Wyoming (BB-32). The photograph was taken as the battleships passed the Battery, and shows the Statue of Liberty in the background.
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo by The Evening World.(New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, 24 November 1916, Final Edition, Image 2, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York212kIn Hampton Roads, Virginia, 10 December 1916.Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
BB-34 New York140kXmas time for Captain Charles F. Hughes & the New York (BB-34).Digital ID:# ggbain 23481v. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection, courtesy of Tom Kermen.
BB-32/33555kTwo hundred and thirty - children were Christmas guests of the sailors on the battleship New York (BB-34). Thelma Wilkening, five years old, danced for them while the ship's band played. Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 31 December 1916, The Tribune Graphic Section Two, Image 53, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 463k Write is wrong # 6.
Six inch gun on New York (BB-34). One of 21 x 5"/51, 14 May 1917.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Chuck Haberlein & Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Photo # LC-B2-3038-1 & text from George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress) via flickr.com.
BB-34286k New York (BB-34) 5" gun, 14 May 1917. USN photo # Lot 10794-3 from the George G. Bain Collection. Courtesy of the Library of Congress, courtesy of the National Museum of the U.S. Navy via flickr.com.
BB-32/331.37kBATTLESHIP NEW YORK (BB-34) AT FULL SPEED
Remarkable marine photograph showing the American battleship New York coming head on at full speed, leading the division of which she is the flagship.
Image and text provided by Louisiana State University; Baton Rouge, LA.
Photo from Tensas Gazette. (St. Joseph, La.) 1886-current, 20 July 1917, Image 2, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York350k New York (BB-34) with seven other Battleships of the Atlantic Fleet at Hampton Roads, 1917.
The ship in the foreground (first from the right) is the Arkansas (BB-33). The photo shows a total of 8 battleships sailing in 2 columns. The cage masts of a battleship is showing above the Arkansas' forward turrets and the ship on the far left is actually 2 ships (3 masts) [the right hand of these 2 appears to be bow on to the camera sailing on a different bearing thus only one mast is showing].
Given the probable date of the photo, the flag on the foremast of Arkansas is probably that of R. Adm. Winslow, which would suggest that the right hand column is probably Battleship Division 1. The New York does appear in the photo as the second ship in the right hand column (second closest in the photo) note the 2 forward casemate guns (verses 1 on 12" gunned BB's) and the 2 gun main turrets.
Assuming the the right hand column is division 1, the next 2 ships in that column would be Utah (BB-31) and the Florida (BB-30)(both funnels are between the masts) and the last ship in line (the bow on ship) may be Delaware (BB-28).
Library of Congress photo # LC-DIG-hec-08103 courtesy of the Harris & Ewing Collection & Digital ID: # hec 08099
Photo i.d. & text courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
Over There
1917 - 1919

BB-32/33405kThe strongest navy afloat.
Above - The Delaware (BB-28) and the Arkansas (BB-33) under the big 12-inch guns of the Florida (BB-30). Right: The signal bridge of the North Dakota (BB-29). Left, One of the searchlight towers on the New York (BB-34).
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 30 December 1917, Image 47, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York178kIn 1917 Admiral Rodman served as Commander, Battleship Division 9, Atlantic Fleet, in his flagship, New York (BB-34). Ordered to European waters late in the year, his division joined the British Grand Fleet at Scapa Flow and became the 6th Battle Squadron, British Grand Fleet, under Admiral Sir David Beatty. For the remainder of World War I, Admiral Rodman commanded his division in operations in the North Sea.Image from Arlington National Cemetery thanks to Robert Snow, courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
BB-34 New York228k Marine Guard of the New York (BB-34), taken in 1917 by Enrique Muller, Jr. from N. Moser, NY.Photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-34 New York510kPhoto entitled "Ocean Spray" New York (BB-34). Photo from the National Geographic Magazine, Volume 31 (1917), page 356, by Lieutenant Commander James B. Gilmer, courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
Atlantic Fleet469kLooking forward on the deck New York (BB-34) during oversea service in World War One. Source: Imperial War Museum Ministry of Information First World War Official Collection by Brunell, W.J. (Lt), Photo No.IWM(Q 18585) courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-34 New York408kAnti-aircraft gun (known as a "sky gun") mounted in the foretop of American battleship New York (BB-34).Source: Imperial War Museum Ministry of Information First World War Official collection, Photo No.© IWM (Q 18584) courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-34 New York576kQuarterdeck of the American battleship New York (BB-34), taken from the foretop.Source: Imperial War Museum Ministry of Information First World War Official collection, Photo No.© IWM (Q 18586) courtesy of Mike Green.
Sixth Battle Squadron229k"Superdreadnaughts of the United States Navy"
This is an original 1917 sepia rotogravure by Bernard Poole showing America's super dreadnaughts during World War I.
Battleships of the Sixth Battle Squadron included the:
Delaware (BB-28),
Florida (BB-30),
Utah (BB-31),
Wyoming (BB-32),
Arkansas (BB-33),
New York (BB-34),
Texas (BB-35) &
Arizona (BB-39) at one time or another.
Photo courtesy of periodpaper.com
BB-34499kPhoto of the arrival of the American Fleet at Scapa Flow, 7 December 1917. The U.S. Navy's Battleship Division Nine being greeted by British Admiral David Beatty and the crew of HMS Queen Elizabeth. Ships of the American column are (from front) New York (BB-34), Wyoming (BB-32), Florida (BB-30) and Delaware (BB-28). This image was painted on Oil on canvas by Bernard F. Gribble. USN photo # Lot-5410-15, Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels Collection. Photographed through Mylar sleeve. Courtesy of the Library of Congress from the National Museum of the U.S. Navy via flickr.com.
BB-34, 32, 30 & 28.95k"Arrival of the American Fleet at Scapa Flow, 7 December 1917." Oil on canvas by Bernard F. Gribble, depicting the U.S. Navy's Battleship Division Nine being greeted by British Admiral David Beatty and the crew of HMS Queen Elizabeth. Ships of the American column are (from front) New York (BB-34), Wyoming (BB-32), Florida (BB-30) and Delaware (BB-28).Courtesy of the U.S. Navy Art Collection, Washington, D.C. USNHC photo # NH 58841-KN.
BB-34, 32, 30 & 28.407kRear Adm. John Harvey, left, is promoted to Vice Admiral by Chief of Naval Operations Adm. Mike Mullen on behalf of the President of the United States on 22 November 2005 at the Pentagon, Washington, D.C.. Vice Adm. Harvey assumed the duties as Chief of Naval Personnel/Deputy Chief of Naval Operations for Manpower, Personnel, Training and Education from Vice Adm. Gerry Hoewing.
In the background is the painting "Arrival of the American Fleet at Scapa Flow, 7 December 1917", an oil on canvas by Bernard F. Gribble, depicting the U.S. Navy's Battleship Division Nine being greeted by British Admiral David Beatty and the crew of HMS Queen Elizabeth. The New York (BB-34) is visible behind Rear Adm. John Harvey.
USN photo # N-2383B-186 by Chief Photographer's Mate Johnny Bivera, courtesy of navy.news.mil.
BB-28 Delaware199k This rare oil painting by American artist Burnell Poole, "The 6th Battle Squadron of the Grand Fleet Leaving the Firth of Forth", is one of less than two dozen paintings owned by the Navy that depicts U.S. naval operations in World War One (WWI). After years of being considered a total loss by Navy Art Gallery curators it has been restored to near perfect condition. The entire process took several months, but the result is the total recovery of a painting that is sure to establish Burnell Poole's name among the best marine painters of the early 20th century.
The composition of the ships of the 6th Battle Squadron during their operational history, appearing in the painting in no particular order were: Delaware (BB-28), Florida (BB-30),Wyoming (BB-32), Arkansas (BB-33), New York (BB-34), Texas (BB-35), & Arizona (BB-39).
Photo and partial text courtesy of Naval Historical Center, Washington, D.C., File photo # N-0000X-001.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 09 June 1918, Image 36, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York 684k Royal Navy (British) during the First World War. Royal Navy and U.S. Fleets at Rosyth, Scotland, 1917. HMS Lion, HMS Inflexible, HMS Indomitable, and the light battle cruiser squadrons with the U.S. Sixth Division behind. USN photo # Lot 9609-39 from the National Museum of the U.S. Navy, courtesy of flickr.com.
BB-34 New York 527k Royal Navy (British) during the First World War. Royal Navy dreadnought battleship, HMS Iron Duke, followed by New York (BB-34) at Scapa Flow, probably during the surrender of the German Fleet in November 1918. USN photo # Lot 9609-32 from the National Museum of the U.S. Navy, courtesy of flickr.com.
BB-34 New York875kDuring her World War I service, New York (BB-34) was frequently visited by royal and other high-ranking representatives of the Allies.
Inspection by the King of Belgium.
King Albert escorted by Admiral Rodman and Queen Elizabeth being escorted by Captain Edward L. Beach, USN, are here shown inspecting Uncle Sam's sailors aboard the battleship New York. They were much impressed by the fine, manly appearance of the American sea veterans. The boys were equally pleased with Belgium's heroic King & Queen.
Photo by Hunter, courtesy of “Harper's Pictorial Library of the World War Vol. XI", Children's Book of War via Bill Gonyo. Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-34 New York121kFront side of a postal card of the New York (BB-34) at Rosyth, Scotland, circa 1918. Imperial War Museum photo contributed by Robert Hurst. Photo taken from U.S. Warships of World War One, by P.H. Silverstone.
BB-34 New York91kSecretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels (left center is welcomed on board New York (BB-34) by the ship's Commanding Officer, Captain Edward L. Beach, during a visit to the ship by the Navy Department's Consulting Board in 1918. Behind Secretary Daniels is the Chief of Naval Operations, Admiral William S. Benson. Just behind Captain Beach is Vice Admiral DeWitt Coffman.USNHC photo # NH 53306 submitted by Bill Gonyo.
BB-34 New York382k21 November 1918 - U.S. battleships witness surrender of German High Seas fleet at Rosyth, Firth of Forth, Scotland, to U.S. and British fleets.
New York (BB-34), Arkansas (BB-33), Delaware (BB-28), Texas (BB-35), Florida (BB-30), and Wyoming (BB-32).
Text & USN photo courtesy of Pacific Battleship Center - Battleship USS Iowa via Ron Reeves.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Andy McIntosh.
Sixth Battle Squadron72kBattleships of the Sixth Battle Squadron (anchored in column in the left half of the photograph): included the
Florida (BB-30)
Utah (BB-31)
Wyoming (BB-32)
Arkansas (BB-33)
New York (BB-34)
Texas (BB-35)
Nevada (BB-36)
Oklahoma (BB-37)
Pennsylvania (BB-38)
& Arizona (BB-39) at one time or another. There are only three of the battleships present in this photo at Brest, France, on 13 December 1918. George Washington (ID-3018), which had just carried President Woodrow Wilson from the United States to France, is in the right background. Photographed by Zimmer
USNHC photo # NH 63454.
BB-34 New York47kCaptain Edward L. Beach, USN, Commandant, Mare Island Navy Yard, California. Photographed on board Intrepid, Receiving Ship at Mare Island, circa spring 1919. In 1918 Captain Edward L. Beach commanded the battleship New York (BB-34) during the final months of World War I. USNHC # NH 53253-A photo submitted by Bill Gonyo.
BB-34 New York426kKing George paid a visit of state to the dreadnought New York (BB-34), flagship of the American fleet which took part in the surrender. In the picture he is seen shaking hands with Rear Admiral Rodman.Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1916-1920, 15 December 1918, Section 3 Pictorial Magazine, Image 29, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-39 Arizona697kTHE NEW YORK (BB-34), REAR ADMIRAL HUGH RODMAN'S FLAGSHIP of the Overseas Fleet, to Which, with the British Grand Fleet, the German Warships Silently Surrendered, on Entering New York Harbor, Firing Salute in Honor of the Secretary of War.Text & photo courtesy of Times Photo Service, N.Y. Times, 5 January 1919, Page 6, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York3.88k"Officers and men of the New York (BB-34) assembled on the ship's forward deck at an American Naval base in England, just before she left Europe for the Christmas rendezvous at New York. On the mast may be seen one of the latest American war secrets, an indicator used in controlling the fire of the big guns." Photo by Press Illustrated Service.
Text courtesy of N.Y. Times,, 5 January 1919, Page 2, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York166k Detail shot of the ship off Brest, France in December, 1918 during her duty as President Wilson's carrier to the Versailles talks. Ship booms are out to tie up visiting launches and bare skids next to aft stack show that one or more of her boats are out too.USN photo.
BB-34 New York48kXmas card and photo inset of the New York (BB-34) in European waters, 1918. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
1920 - Pre Pearl Harbor Attack
BB-34 New York26k"Preliminaries to Surrender of the German Fleet. U. S. Admiral Rodman, accompanied by Admiral Sims, extending a cordial greeting to King George of England as the latter came on board the New York (BB-34), the flagship of the American Dreadnought squadron." Photo by Underwood & Underwood, text courtesy of N.Y. Times 31 December 1919, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York3.88kOverhead of the ship taken in 5 January 1919, while she was steaming at 17 knots. Taken from a kite balloon at 1000 feet which increased visibility of the ship's spotters. Long barreled 5"ers and derrick top 3"ers are easily visible.Photo courtesy of Times Photo Service.
Text courtesy of N.Y. Times,, 5 January 1919, Page 2, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York230kFront page of the N.Y. Times 5 January 1919, Page 6, showing among other things: "The New York (BB-34), Rear Admiral Hugh Rodman's flagship of the over-sea's fleet, to which, with the British Grand Fleet, the German warships silently surrendered, on entering New York Harbor, firing a salute in honor of the Secretary of War." Times Photo Service, text courtesy of N.Y. Times 5 January 1919, Page 6, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-34 New York453kAMERICAN BATTLESHIP SINKS SUBMARINE
U. S. WARSHIPS FIGHT WITH HUN U-BOATS IN THE NORTH SEA
ADMIRAL RODMAN'S FLAGSHIP RUNS DOWN AND SINKS GERMAN

Facts of Sea Battle by the Yankee Navy Daring Last Days of War Revealed; Three Torpedoes Fired At Same Time by Submersible At Leader of Squadron Sent To Give Pursuit To the German Sea Wolves
Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX.
Photo from the El Paso Herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, 25 January 1919, Business Revival and Peace Edition, Cable News, Sport and Classified Section, Image 13, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet1.05k"Duty Completed" - And Our Victory Fleet Speeds Home
America passing in review, with the New York (BB-34) in the lead, just before leaving British waters for home.
Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 13 April 1919, Image 63, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
New York Harbor1.78k"American dreadnoughts & super-dreadnoughts steaming into New York harbor 14 April 1919."
The Texas (BB-35) leads the procession with a airplane on her turret catapult. Note the escorting biplane.
The "escorting" aircraft is either a Curtiss HS-1 or HS-2 (note the single engine) can't tell which from the photo. The aircraft on a fly-off platform atop the No. 2 turret of the Texas is 1 of 6 Sopwith Camels purchased from Britain at the end of the war.
The platforms were a British concept designed to provide the fleet with an aircraft capable of reaching the high flying Zeppelins which the German Navy occasionally used as scouts. The Texas was the only US Battleship to be fitted with turret fly-off platforms while in Europe and was the test bed for this program in the US Navy. Not visible in this view is a stripped down (No fabric and no wings) Sopwith 1-1/2 Strutter lashed atop the No. 3 Turret. The platforms were eventually mounted on all 14" gun BB's through the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class (with mixed reviews from their commanders) and carried either a Hanriot HD-1 or a Nieuport’ 28. Though equipped inflatable floats for water landings, this tended to do a lot of damage not the least of which was dowsing a hot engine in cold salt water. By 1920 a successful compressed air catapult was developed and were being mounted on the aft deck of all 4 turreted battleships and fly-off platforms were removed. The Texas and New York (BB-34), because of their 5 Turrets, lacked the deck space for the catapult and had to make do with a float plane (Vought VE-7) sitting on the aft deck which would be launched by lowering it over the side for a surface take-off.
If you look carefully at this photo you see the VE-7 on the deck and the A-frame hoist used for handling it.
Photo by Paul Thompson.
Text courtesy of N.Y. Times 31 December 1919, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
Atlantic  Fleet975kHow the Atlantic Fleet looked to the camera man in a seaplane flying over lower Manhattan a week ago yesterday morning as the mighty armada came up the bay to anchorage in the Hudson off Riverside Drive for a two weeks' vacation after months of strenuous maneuvers in Southern waters. The destroyers Dale (DD-290) and Flusser (DD-289) are shown leading the column of eight dreadnoughts: Oklahoma (BB-37), Nevada (BB-36), Arizona (BB-39), flagship Pennsylvania (BB-38), Utah (BB-31), Florida (BB-30), North Dakota (BB-29) and Delaware (BB-28) past the Statue of Liberty at a fifteen-knot clip. In addition to the big battleships, the fleet includes thirty-two destroyers, numerous supply ships and several submarines.
The Atlantic battleship fleet is home again. Here are the twelve great first line fighting ships that are paying Father Knickerbocker a two weeks' visit. Over a hundred of Uncle Sam's grim sea warriors gray the North River, while their 30,000 sailor-men are given the freedom of the city in a royal welcome home.
The Battleship Mississippi (BB-41) leading the fleet into the harbor, as photographed from an airplane. Note the airplanes atop the forward and aft turrets.
Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 20 April 1919, Image 48, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
 New York763kStern view of New York (BB-34) underway in the Panama canal, circa 1919-21.Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Lieutenant Thomas Marshall Colston Photograph Album.
US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 1986.094.001.031.
BB-34 New York863kOverhead view of the New York (BB-34) passing through the Panama Canal in July, 1919.US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No.1986.094.001.032 via Mike Green.
BB-34 New York46kPost card of the New York (BB-34) transiting the Panama Canal, 25 July 1919.Courtesy of Richard Leonhardt.
BB-34 New York130k New York (BB-34) transiting the Culebra Cut in the Panama Canal. She was in the Caribbean in spring 1919, and that summer joined the Pacific Fleet at San Diego, her home port for the next 16 years.USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri. Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-34 New York179kPost card of the New York (BB-34) passing thru the East Chamber of the Pedro Miguel Locks, Panama Canal, circa 1919.Courtesy of Jim Geldert.
BB-35 Texas578kMan O War Row, Texas (BB-35), Arkansas (BB-33), Wyoming (BB-32) & New York (BB-34) at anchor, San Francisco harbor, Xmas 1920. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-34 New York3.33k`New York (BB-34) in for repairs at Hampton Roads.Photo by Matthew Doolittle via Fred Willishaw.
BB-34 New York1.52kTwenties tweet: Two twin turrets turned towards training trainees. Photo by Matthew Doolittle via Fred Willishaw.
BB-34 New York1.54kNew York (BB-34) circa 1916 - 1924 marked with an E.Photo by Matthew Doolittle via Fred Willishaw.
BB-34 New York13.7k31 photo PDF of the New York (BB-34) circa 1916 - 1924.Photos by Matthew Doolittle via Fred Willishaw.
BB-35 Texas91kSo many wires appear from the New York (BB-34) as if she is engulfed in a spider's web.
When the Texas & New York were designed and constructed, the U.S. Navy still held to the notion that a commanding officer was better able to con his ship if he were in touch with the elements, thus most warships of this era were constructed with open air navigation bridges (the last vestiges of the era of sail). On the New York class this platform was situated behind and about 4 feet below the roof level of the conning tower. To afford some protection from the elements it is usually protected canvas wind breaks along the hand rails and an awning overhead. Both of the photos in question show this arrangement.
Upon the U.S. entering WW I, the Royal Navy sent a team of officers "across the pond" to inspect the fleet we were sending over and offer suggestions that would better enable the American ships to operate along side the Royal Navy. Among the suggestions offered was the construction of enclosed pilot houses capable of withstanding the pounding of the heavy seas of the northern latitudes and afford protection from the cold winter temperatures and sea spray. Therefore in 1917 all battleships sent to the war zone were fitted with such a structure. On the New York and Texas the pilot house was attached to the forward cage mast at a level above the roof of the conning tower. Both of the photos show the original navigation bridge arrangement therefore they have to have been taken prior to 1917 and thus they can not have been taken on the west coast.
Of course the problem with sister ships is how to tell one from the other. In the case of the Texas and the New York during the pre-WW I time period (1914-1917), the best tell tale is the arrangement of the searchlights on the masts. The Texas carried her searchlights on individual platforms mounted one above the other about half way up the foremast and below the level of the funnels (and thus the smoke) on the main mast. The New York carried her searchlights side by side on a single platform about a third of the way up the foremast and below the funnel tops on the main mast. Given that the photographs in question are from this time frame we see that the photo that N. Moser labeled Texas is in fact the New York and the photograph labeled New York is in the Texas. During her refit in 1917, the Texas's searchlights were rearranged to the same as the New York's but photos from 1917 to 1920 can be distinguished by the clearly visible pilot house and the fly-off platforms atop the Nos. 2 and 4 turrets. The presence of 3" AA guns atop the Nos. 3 and 4 turrets will date photos in the 1921-1925 time frame.
USN Photo by N. Moser, from the collection of the Vallejo Naval and Historical Museum, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-34 New York1.50k New York (BB-34) at anchor, circa late teens-early 20's. USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard M. Jensen.
BB-34 New York62k A smoky New York (BB-34) appears here, circa late teens-early 20's before any modifications were made in her original configuration. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-34 New York155kCaptain William Veazie Pratt was the Commanding Officer of the battleship New York (BB-34) in 1919-1921. He appears here as Rear Admiral. Photographed circa the mid-1920s. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 55466, courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
BB-43 Tennessee 237k Foreground is definitely Tennessee (BB-43). In the middle is Idaho (BB-42) (darker camouflage note also the fantail catapult) and upper right is Arizona (BB-39), less certain but based on main mast platforms verses the New Mexico (BB-40). Middle background is New York (BB-34) (navigation bridge not over hanging conning tower). The far left background is the Texas (BB-35) (blunt bow, 2 funnels).
The aircraft is a Naval Aircraft Factory / Curtiss / Canadian Aeroplane Ltd F-5L.
The date of Mr. Kreisman's photo has to be 1920-1921. By 1922 all 14' and 16" gunned BB's (except New York and Texas as the 5th turret did not leave enough deck space) had been fitted with a compressed air catapult on the stern. The presence of a stern A/C catapult on only one of the three 1916 program BB's suggest this early in the introduction of this equipment but late enough for the turret top fly-off platforms to have been removed from all ships present. In 1919 the Battle Fleet shifted its base to San Pedro in California where it remained based until shifted to Pearl Harbor. The Texas and New York were assigned to that fleet until they returned east for modernization in 1925. This would suggest that the photo was taken some where in the Pacific. The rich flora onshore suggest a tropical climate and the enclosed by would lead me to guess Panama or Gitmo. If the 1920 or 1921 Fleet problem was conducted in Atlantic waters could explain an Atlantic based aircraft with a Pacific based Fleet.
Photo courtesy of Lance Kreisman via Fabio Pen~a.
Photo & text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn, Alan Moore & Richard Jensen.
Aircraft i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore via Larkins, William T. US Navy Aircraft 1921-1941/US Marine Corps Aircraft 1914-1959. [The image came from the USMC aircraft section, pg(9).] Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 1995. (originally published as US Marine Corps Aircraft 1914-1959, copyright 1959, and US Navy Aircraft 1921-1941, copyright 1961).
 New York416kStern view of New York (BB-34), circa 1921.Photo from the collection of Percy & Bill Fenner submitted by Ann Moss.
BB 30265kMain & Auxiliary Wireless Antennae New York (BB-34)
This is an original 1921 halftone print of a wireless antennae on the top of the New York.
Photo courtesy of periodpaper.com
BB-34 New York28kPort broadside view of the New York (BB-34). Radio antennae are visible and the white "E" on the conning tower stands for excellence on gunnery. Eight sided unit on the foremast is for secondary battery and searchlight control. Photo taken before the ship was modernized.USN photo contributed by Mike Green, courtesy of Leeward Publications.
BB-34 New York80kStern view of the ship taken 1922-1923 showing 3" A.A guns, mounted in pairs; on turrets #3 and #4. These two turret tops were quite crowded as the long base range finders were mounted there too. Two more 3" guns are visible on the derrick tops too. Of particular interest is the seaplane on the fantail and the jury rigged crane used to handle it.USN photo.
BB-34 New York69kSan Pedro, California, 1923 – Rear Admiral Louis McCoy Nulton made the New York (BB-34) his flagship while serving as the Commander of Pacific Battle Fleet Division 3. Digital ID: ggbain 15809. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
Battle Fleet1.60kU.S. Navy Battle fleet steaming into Panama Bay to join scouting fleet for combined fleet maneuvers, probably 1923.
The irony of this photo is that the ship with the least certain ID is the one closest to the camera! The probability is that she is the California (BB-44) based on the fact that the 3 Colorado class (BB-45 / 48) operated for such a short time without catapults and the ship in the photo has a bare quarterdeck). The photo is not clear enough to show twin or triple turrets. However, the ships in the background show enough unique characteristics to give more certainty about an ID. The nearest column are, left to right, Mississippi (BB-41) (uneven lookout station heights on the cagemasts), Tennessee (BB-43), (unique searchlight towers on after stack), and Idaho (BB-42) (lower bridge than New Mexico (BB-40) ). The two ships in the second column are New York (BB-34) (bridge does not extend out far enough to be Texas (BB-35) ) and Nevada (BB-36) (no enclosed lookout stations on the cagemasts and she has a catapult on her quarterdeck). The farthest column has (again left to right) Arizona (BB-39) (lower bridge), Pennsylvania (BB-38) (higher bridge) and New Mexico (again, the higher bridge). It is interesting that the only apparent catapult is the one on the Nevada. This would place the photo in the 1922-24 time frame.
Ernest La Rue Collection, Gift of the U.S. Army. Courtesy of the Library of Congress. USN photo # Lot-11952-VI-37, courtesy of the National Museum of the U.S. Navy, courtesy of flickr.com.
Photo & text i.d. courtesy of Richard M. Jensen.
BB-28 Delaware819kPanoramic photo of the U.S. fleet in Panama Bay (Pacific entrance to the Panama Canal) on 1 March 1923. 70 vessels are viewed; the Battle Fleet consists of all U.S. battleships from the Delaware (BB-28) through the Idaho (BB-42). Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, courtesy of Tom Kermen. Copyright R.G. Lewis, Y Photo Shop, Balboa, C.Z."
BB-34 New York525kThe United States fleet in Colon Harbor, Atlantic entrance to the Panama Canal, 21 January 1924. What appears to be the New York (BB-34) or the Texas (BB-35) is in the foreground. Library of Congress photo # 6a24199r, from the Prints and Photographs Division, courtesy of Tom Kermen. Copyright R.G. Lewis, Y Photo Shop, Balboa, C.Z."
BB-34 New York298k New York (BB-34) in dock, good image of the bow and the concentration dial, or "Clock", circa 1924.
The practice of gunnery at the beginning of the 20th century put a lot of emphasis on shooting first. Radio communications was still in diapers (cumbersome, Morse code, slow) and visual signals, light, flag hoist or semaphore, were not much better. When an enemy was detected it also took time to train and elevate the guns to shoot at him. In poor visibility this might give him the first shot. The range clocks, and their companion, the deflection markers, were developed to shorten the time needed to get off the first salvo.
Concentration of fire was also a major consideration, and usually all ships of a division would fire on the same target. Fire control was based on mechanical analog devices that incorporated input from the optical range finders located at several places on the ship. In USN ships this included the top of the cage mast.
Long range visibility under battle conditions was often poor. The heavy black smoke from burning coal just made it worse. But individual ships could be expected to have a reasonably clear view of the next ship ahead in the division line. The flagship was almost always in the lead, and could direct concentration of fire by passing range and deflection data to the other ships. This process was made much faster by simply training the flagships own guns in the direction of the enemy and displaying the ships own average rangefinder results on a circular display.
Trailing ships often did not have as good a view f the enemy as the leader, but could observe where the leaders guns were aimed (and read numbers from the range clock) in order to set initial values for aiming their own guns. That is enough of the background theory.
There was no CIC as we know it today, but there was a central fire control plot on each ship. This plot included a MECHANICAL device for determining and transmitting refined settings for azimuth and elevation of the guns. Initial inputs were often set manually.
Communications between the plot and the gun turrets (and the range clocks) included up to 4 separate and parallel methods.
First, there was a mechanical connection, usually a bicycle chain and sprocket drive to ensure equivalent movement. Second, voice tubes connected the plot with rangefinder positions and guns. Third, when they became available, there were internal communications telephones matching the above circuits. Finally, if other means failed, you could write a note and send it by messenger.
There is an excellent series of articles on battleship gunnery fire control in this era in WARSHIP INTERNATIONAL. vol 38 numbers 1,2,3 (2001) and also vol 41. It is devoted to the plotting instruments, not range clocks. As a final note, I'm sure you already noticed that the range "clocks" are numbered from 1 to 10, not 1 to 12. The figures were usually given in thousands of yards.
Photo courtesy of Jon Burdett.
Text courtesy of Aryeh Wetherhorn, (USN & Israeli Navy, Retired).
BB-47 Washington 146k Final moments of Washington (BB-47) on 25 November 1924. Battleship New York (BB-34) in the background. USN photo.
BB-35 Texas 648k New York (BB-34) & Texas (BB-35), April 1925, at Norfolk Navy Yard. National Archives Identifier: 52560683
Local Identifier: 181-V-7007
Photo courtesy of catalog.archives.gov
Carl Theodore Vogelgesang147kCapt. Carl Theodore Vogelgesang. On 3 April 1925, he broke his flag in New York (BB-34) and became Commander, Battleship Division 2 of the Scouting Fleet. In June 1926, he was detached from command of Battleship Division 2 and took command of the Light Cruiser Division, Scouting Fleet.Photo from the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
 New York502kAerial bow view of New York (BB-34) in the Panama Canal, July 1925. Photographed through Mylar sleeve. Collection of Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels.
USN photo # Lot 5416-4, courtesy of the National Museum of the U.S. Navy, via flickr.com.
BB-34 New York59kEulogizing the dead before burial at sea., circa 1925. Courtesy of Jon Burdett.
BB-34 New York19k New York (BB-34) in a storm in mid-Pacific, between San Francisco California, and Astoria, Oregon July 1925.Courtesy of Jon Burdett.
BB-34 New York24kSome of the gang after coaling ship on the New York (BB-34), July 1925.Courtesy of Jon Burdett.
BB-34 New York57kBruno, New York's (BB-34) mascot, gets a swig of O.J., circa 1925.Courtesy of Jon Burdett.
BB-34 New York26k New York (BB-34) at coal dock Cristobal, Canal Zone. 12 June, 1925.Courtesy of Jon Burdett.
BB-34 New York58kTowing for the Colorado (BB-45) in target practice, 1925.Courtesy of Jon Burdett.
BB-35 Texas65k Texas (BB-35) in drydock at Norfolk Navy Yard in 1925 as she began modernization. The ship at the right is the New York (BB-34), also undergoing modernization. USN photo contributed by Mike Green, courtesy of Leeward Publications.
BB-34 New York118kSanta Claus on the New York (BB-34), 1925.Digital ID # ggbain 23486, LC-B2- 5531-10. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.
BB-34 New York80kUnusual fire control device mounted on New York's (BB-34) top turret on Xmas, 1925. Signal flags read "Merry Xmas". Digital ID # ggbain 23485v, LC-B2-4091-5. Signal Flag source i.d. courtesy of Charles Haberlein Jr. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection.
BB-34 New York122k New York (BB-34) undergoing her major refit at Norfolk Navy Yard 10 April 1927.
After the Washington Naval Treaty of 1922 which scrapped major naval units, the U.S. used its money and materials in refitting existing fleet units. The New York's forward batteries are trained to port and starboard, and training markings painted on her 14-inch gun turret side. No funnels or control towers are on deck, her cage masts have been removed.
USN photo courtesy of maritimequest.com.
BB-34 New York491kOfficers & crew of the New York (BB-34) - 16 April 1927. Photo courtesy of Jamie Baygents.
BB-34 New York164k New York (BB-34) after her 1926-1927 rebuild. She received new fire controls similar to the California/Colorado classes (BB-44-48), new boilers, masts, secondary weapons, and light weight machine guns. Her hull was rebuilt with bulges/blisters for torpedo and gun protection.Official USN photograph contributed by Robert M. Cieri.
BB-34 New York1.33k New York (BB-34) after her major refit at Norfolk Navy Yard 10 April 1927. She still retains her individual secondary battery which would be removed sometime between then and 1932.Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-34 New York401kThree page PDF Xmas card cover from the New York (BB-34), 1927 while at San Pedro, California. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Battlefleet122kWatercolor of a Presidential review during President Hoover's term of office, 1928-32.
Crews line the rails of a Colorado class (BB-45 / 48) battleship as the ships pass in line astern of the reviewing stand with the airship Los Angeles (ZR-3) piercing the clouds accompanied by 9 biplanes.
Courtesy of Michael Schwarz.
Battlefleet56kView of the U.S. Battlefleet from above, possibly from the airship Los Angeles (ZR-3). Photo courtesy of periscopefilm.com.
BB-30  & 34101kPicturesque bow view of the Florida (BB-30) from between the after turrets of the New York (BB-34). A fleet of 41 ships arrived in New York on 5 February 1929 from southern waters for a two week visit fresh from winter manuvers.Courtesy of Stan Svec.
BB-34 New York105k New York (BB-34) viewed through the trees. A fleet of 41 ships arrived in New York on 5 February 1929 from southern waters for a two week visit fresh from winter maneuvers.USN photo.
BB-34 New York501k New York (BB-34) docked next to Nantucket lightship in Boston Navy Yard on 01/01/1930. Photo # 08_06_005845 from the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones collection, courtesy of Kate Monea, Archivist, USS Constitution Museum.
BB-34 New York763kAbandon ship drill, 1932. Note life jackets, crockery and rifle. USN photo # NH 45011 from U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph courtesy of the National Museum of the U.S. Navy via flickr.com.
BB-34 New York94k New York (BB-34) leading Nevada (BB-36) and Oklahoma (BB-37) during maneuvers, 1932. The carrier Langley (CV-1) is partially visible in the distance.USNHC # NH 48138.
Colon, Canal Zone2.44kShips of the United States Fleet pictured at anchor inside the breakwater at Colon, Canal Zone, 1935.
The carriers are, front to back, Langley (CV-1), Saratoga (CV-3) and Lexington (CV-2). The two battleships beyond Lexington are the New York (BB-34) with Texas (BB-35) behind. The nearest battleship, straight up from the Langley is Pennsylvania (BB-38). The BB immediately beyond and to the left of Pennsylvania (BB-38) is California (BB-44). The remaining battleships include two New Mexico's: Mississippi (BB-41) and Idaho (BB-42) , but even this higher rez shot is not clear enough to tell which is which. Also are the rest of the "Big Five" and what is probably one of the Nevada's, but that is not certain. The photo is not clear enough for positive identifications. The cruisers to the left are three Northampton's (CA-26 / 31) and the two Pensacola's (CA-24 & 25) (the pair furthest from the camera) and six Omaha's.
Photo & text i.d. courtesy of Richard M. Jensen.
Photo courtesy of National Naval Aviation Museum (NNAM) photo (# 1996.488.001.006) courtesy of Fabio Pena.
BB-34 New York413k New York (BB-34) ahead of Pennsylvania (BB-38). The next ship ahead is a Tennessee class (BB-43 /44) based on the slope of the turret roofs. (Uniform slope back to front - no kink like the twin 16" mounts on the Colorado's (BB-45). Based on the relatively full appearance of the forward superstructure, I am leaning toward California (BB-44) which had an enlarged flag bridge as Battle Force Flagship. The other three are obviously Tennessee (BB-43) and/or Colorado class (BB-45 / 48) but are too indistinct to ID specifically. Because of the boom cranes on the sterns, the photo was taken between 1931 and 1934.Photo courtesy of Kerry Garrett.
Photo & text i.d. courtesy of Richard M. Jensen.
BB-34 New York953k New York (BB-34) circa 1930's. Photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-34 New York645kFrom the bottom up, Constitution, Farragut (DD-348), Texas (BB-35), New York (BB-34), and unidentified ships further along, in the Charlestown Navy Yard, Boston, MA., 24 June 1934. Picture ID by Kate Monea, Archivist, USS Constitution Museum,
USN photo from the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones collection, courtesy of John Cross via Issac Davis.
BB-34 New York309kRADM. Husband E. Kimmel commanded the battleship New York (BB-34) from 1934 to 1935. USN photo courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
BB-34 New York212kStarboard side underway, August 1935. National Archives # 80-G-423350.
BB-34 New York86k New York (BB-34) in the Kaiser Wilhelm Canal, 1937.Jesse P. Mannix / USN photo.
Kiel, Germany448kDawn in the harbor of Kiel, Germany. Left to right - training ships Gorch Fock and Horst Wessel, [Now USCGC Eagle], New York (BB-34), Wyoming (BB-32) and Arkansas (BB-33). USNIP., January 1938. USNI Photo Navy Recruiting Bureau, N.Y. Photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
Kiel, Germany509kAmerican Bluejackets in Kiel, Germany. In the background the New York (BB-34), on the right the Wyoming (BB-32). USNIP.,January 1938.USNI Photo Navy Recruiting Bureau, N.Y. Photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
Coronation Naval Review767kIn 1937, carrying Admiral Hugh Rodman, the President's personal representative for the coronation of King George VI of England, New York (BB-34) sailed to take part in the Grand Naval Review of 20 May 1937 as sole U.S. Navy representative.
Note that New York is flying the Royal Navy white ensign and there are UK battleships in the background.
Partial text courtesy of DANFS & David Buell.
USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
Coronation Naval Review314kIn 1937, carrying Admiral Hugh Rodman, the President's personal representative for the coronation of King George VI of England, New York (BB-34) sailed to take part in the Grand Naval Review of 20 May 1937 as sole U.S. Navy representative.
In the foreground is the HMS Nelson at the Coronation Naval Review with the New York and the French Dunkerque in the background. USNIP., March, 1938.
USNI Photo Navy Recruiting Bureau, N.Y.
Photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-34 New York184kXAF Radar (Transmitter and Receiver) which was installed on New York (BB-34) by the U.S. Naval Research Laboratory in late 1938. While mounted on that ship, this experimental 200 megacycle radar was tested at sea during the first months of 1939. Official USN photo # NH 105852 from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.
BB-34 New York120kView of the ship's forward superstructure, with the antenna of the XAF radar atop her pilot house, circa late 1938 or early 1939. A cropped version of this image, emphasizing the radar antenna, is 013421a. Note the battleship's foremast, with its gunfire control facilities; her armored conning tower; and the rangefinder atop her Number Two gun turret.Official USN photo # NH 77350 from the collections of the Naval Historical Center. Photo courtesy of Chuck Haberlein.
BB-34 New York98k Official Postal Cover from the battleship New York (BB-34) commemorating the Midshipmen's Summer Practice Cruise in 1939. Photograph contributed by Robert M. Cieri.
BB-34 New York312kNorfolk VA., 13 April 1939. "Texas (BB-35) is bounded by New York (BB-34)".
At least the battleships of those names are neighbors, as they stand tied up at Hampton Roads here during yesterday's preliminary off the Virginia capes. Janes Fighting Ships authority on the world's fighting battlecraft, describes the Texas & New York as slow, hard to handle and bad sea boats in rough weather.
A.P. Wirephoto from the collection of Michael Strout, courtesy of Jonathan Eno.
BB-35 Texas445kNorfolk VA., 13 April 1939. "Steel forest for Americas shores".
Menacing, gun laden tripod masts of the battleships Texas (BB-35) & New York (BB-34), both completed in 1914, are shown here as fleet began to arrive here yesterday for naval maneuvers off Virginia capes, preparatory to grand parade to N.Y. late this month. Both ships have 10 14" guns, 16 5" guns, and each can carry 3 aircraft.
A.P. Wire photo from the collection of Michael Strout, courtesy of Jonathan Eno.
BB-35 Texas177kN.Y. 29 April 1939. "Fleet steams up Hudson".
Thirty seven vessels of the Atlantic Squadron steamed through N.Y. harbor and up the Hudson River today as part of the ceremonies connected with tomorrow's opening of the World Fair. This striking picture made from the deck of the New York (BB-34) flagship, shows the Texas (BB-35) followed by the Tennessee (BB-43).
A.P. Wire photo from the collection of Michael Strout, courtesy of Jonathan Eno.
BB-35 Texas221kN.Y. 3 May 1939. "The Navy's eyes probe the sky".
Two battleships [looks to be the Texas (BB-35) & New York (BB-34)] of the Navy's Atlantic squadron made this pretty picture on the Hudson when their huge searchlights were played across the sky in search of imaginary aerial attackers. The lights of New York's myriad skyscrappers twinkle through from the background.
A.P. Wire photo from the collection of Michael Strout, courtesy of Jonathan Eno.
BB-34 New York309kStern view of the New York (BB-34) on the Hudson. USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-34 New York134kMidshipmen and Sailors boarding a 50-foot motor launch, during the summer 1940 Naval Academy Midshipmen's cruise. Note whaleboat on the midships' davits and Curtiss SOC-3 aircraft of Observation Squadron Five (VO-5) on deck and atop the catapult. The plane at right appears to be Bureau # 1090.USNHC # NH 50303.
WW II
BB-34 New York331k Looking aft from top of foremast. Note the Type P MK.IV that replaced the earlier MK.1A compressed air catapult atop New York's (BB-34) #3 Main Battery Turret. Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, VA., 27 January 1942.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels. Photo Serial # 2621 (42).
BB-34 New York227k Looking aft from amidships at the After Lookout Station built halfway up the tripod Mainmast with 36-Inch Searchlights mounted on platforms above it. Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, VA., 27 January 1942.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels. Photo Serial # 2622 (42).
BB-34 New York209k Looking aft from top of after mast. Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, VA., 27 January 1942.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels. Photo Serial # 2623 (42).
BB-34 New York187kLooking Fwd.from stern, port side. Note the life rafts and the 20mm guns with greater range and force to deal with faster, more heavily armored aircraft. Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, VA., 27 January 1942.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels. Photo Serial # 2624 (42).
BB-34 New York226kLooking aft at the 14-Inch,45-caliber MK.8 guns in twin MK.12 Turret #1 & -2. Note the MK.3 radar antenna on her tripod Foremast and 20mm Oerlikons at Norfolk Naval Yard, Portsmouth, VA. 27 January 1942. USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels. Photo Serial # 2625 (42).
BB-34 New York184kLooking Fwd. from top of aftermast. Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, VA. 27 January 1942. Note the large yardarm that carried flag hoists and radio antennas, and, a year later, anemometers and IFF antennas.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels. Photo Serial # 2626 (42).
BB-34 New York179kLooking forward from bottom of after mast, port side. Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, VA. 27 January 1942. Note the large yardarm that carried flag hoists and radio antennas, and, a year later, anemometers and IFF antennas.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels. Photo Serial # 2627 (42).
BB-34 New York194k New York (BB-34) in modified Ms12 system with splotches of 5-O atop an area of 5-H. View off the port bow. Norfolk Naval Yard, Portsmouth, VA. 27 January 1942. USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels. Photo Serial # 2629 (42).
Photo i.d. courtesy of nautilusmodels.com
BB-34 New York192kStb. side, looking down and aft from bridge, showing 3-Inch 50Cal. and 1.1-Inch 75 Cal.A.A. guns. Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, VA. 27 January 1942.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels. Photo Serial # 2631 (42).
BB-34 New York309k New York (BB-34) wearing Measure 12 Modified, 1 February 1942 at Norfolk.USN photo courtesy of David Buell. Photo i.d. courtesy of David Buell, Pieter Bakels & Aryeh Weterhorn.
BB-34 New York244kStarboard side view of New York (BB-34) on 1 February 1942 at Norfolk. USN photo # 80-G-464524, now in the collection of the US National Archives in College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-34 New York331kAerial oblique view of New York (BB-34) at sea, February, 1942. USN photo # 80-G-464622, now in the collection of the US National Archives in College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-34 New York145kTurret #3 with Type P, MK IV catapult and Kingfisher AC.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-34 New York618kImagine this is the New York (BB-34) while looking at a broadside of the Texas (BB-35). Official USN photo courtesy The Ships and Aircraft of the United States Fleet by Admiral James C. Fahey, courtesy of Tommy Trampp.
BB-34 New York143kStarboard and overhead line drawing of the New York (BB-34) in 1942. The main change since her reconstruction was the addition of many light antiaircraft weapons. Photo and text courtesy of U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
BB-34 New York67kOil on canvas painting by the artist Anthony Saunders entitled "Escort for the Troops - New York (BB-34)".
The Atlantic ocean was the lifeline between Britain and America, as well as millions of tons of raw materials, GI's were also transported over in all manor of hastily converted liners. Protecting the troops from marauding u-boats and German surface ships was of paramount importance to the allied fleets.
Text and drawing courtesy of naval-art.com
BB-34 New York96kOff North Africa on 10 November 1942, just after the Battle of Casablanca.Official USN photo now in the collections of the National Archives, USNHC # 80-G-31582.
BB-34 New York245k Officers of the New York (BB-34) during the early 1940's - TC Edrington III PhD, Capt. USN back row, second from right.From the collection of Capt. Thomas C. Edrington III, USN. Contributed by his daughter Kyra Larn Edrington and son Thomas C. Edrington IV.
BB-34 New York109k New York (BB-34), aft view plane crew. November 1942. New York brought her big guns to the invasion of North Africa, providing crucial gunfire support at Safi 8 November 1942. She then stood by at Casablanca and Fedhala before returning home for convoy duty escorting critically needed men and supplies to North Africa. She then took up important duty training gunners for battleships and destroyer escorts in Chesapeake Bay, rendering this vital service until 10 June 1944, when she began the first of 3 training cruises for the Naval Academy, voyaging to Trinidad on each.From the collection of Capt. Thomas C. Edrington III, USN. Contributed by his daughter Kyra Larn Edrington and son Thomas C. Edrington IV. Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-34 New York803k New York (BB-34) and Charger (ACV-30) waiting to go east at Norfolk Naval Yard, Portsmouth, VA. 11 August 1942. Photo i.d. courtesy of Fabio Peña.
US National Archives photo # 80-G-11058 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-34 New York129k Looking down the 20mm line. November 1942, Safi.From the collection of Capt. Thomas C. Edrington III, USN. Contributed by his daughter Kyra Larn Edrington and son Thomas C. Edrington IV.
BB-34 New York95k Vought OS2U "Kingfisher" float plane, landing alongside the 20mm guns. November 1942, Safi.From the collection of Capt. Thomas C. Edrington III, USN. Contributed by his daughter Kyra Larn Edrington and son Thomas C. Edrington IV.
BB-34 New York61k Vought OS2U "Kingfisher" floatplane, being recovered. November 1942, Safi.From the collection of Capt. Thomas C. Edrington III, USN. Contributed by his daughter Kyra Larn Edrington and son Thomas C. Edrington IV.
BB-34 New York80k Vought OS2U "Kingfisher" floatplane being rigged for recovery, November 1942, Safi.From the collection of Capt. Thomas C. Edrington III, USN. Contributed by his daughter Kyra Larn Edrington and son Thomas C. Edrington IV.
BB-34 New York83k Pilot being debreifed. TC Edrington III can be seen just behind and slightly to the righ of the pilot - TC Edrington was the gunnery officer and the accuracy of the New York's (BB-34) fire was given high praise. November 1942, Safi.From the collection of Capt. Thomas C. Edrington III, USN. Contributed by his daughter Kyra Larn Edrington and son Thomas C. Edrington IV.
BB-34 New York90kPitching into heavy seas while en route from Casablanca on convoy escort duty, March 1943. View looks forward from her foremast. Note her twin 14"/45 gun turrets and water flowing over main deck.Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-65893, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-34 New York201k New York (BB-34) at the N.Y. Navy Yard in 1943. Main battery unchanged. Note Stovepipe IFF antennas,TBS,an SG on a platform just below her Secondary Battery Director Deck and the covered MK.51's atop her boat cranes. USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-34 New York236k New York (BB-34) at the N.Y. Navy Yard in April 1943. The Fire Control and Spotting Station atop the Secondary Battery Control Station aft and below the top of the stack with little smoke interference. It did not have a Battle Lookout Level.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-34 New York290k New York (BB-34) April 1943. Note the 1.1-Inch mount on the left and the 25-men life rafts stacked on deck.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-34 New York238k New York (BB-34) in Measure 22 on April 1943. Note the added quadruple Bofors 40mm's replacing the less effecient 1.1-Inch mounts, considerably increasing her air defence capabilities.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-34 New York2.44k New York (BB-34) at the Navy Yard, N.Y. April 1943. Note the new floater nets atop her #4 Main Battery Turret and the numerous stacked life rafts and new A.A.guns reflecting lessons learned in the Solomons.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-34 New York99k New York (BB-34) 3" gun mount, 9 September 1943.From the collection of Capt. Thomas C. Edrington III, USN. Contributed by his daughter Kyra Larn Edrington and son Thomas C. Edrington IV.
BB-34 New York215k New York (BB-34) rapid fire 3" gun mount, 9 September 1943.From the collection of Capt. Thomas C. Edrington III, USN. Contributed by his daughter Kyra Larn Edrington and son Thomas C. Edrington IV.
BB-34 New York148k New York (BB-34) firing her main battery, circa 1943.From the collection of Capt. Thomas C. Edrington III, USN. Contributed by his daughter Kyra Larn Edrington and son Thomas C. Edrington IV.
BB-34 New York53k Vought OS2U "Kingfisher" floatplane, being recovered, circa 1943.From the collection of Capt. Thomas C. Edrington III, USN. Contributed by his daughter Kyra Larn Edrington and son Thomas C. Edrington IV.
BB-34 New York86k Preparing the target drone for flight, circa 1943.From the collection of Capt. Thomas C. Edrington III, USN. Contributed by his daughter Kyra Larn Edrington and son Thomas C. Edrington IV.
BB-34 New York169k Launching a drone for target practice, circa 1943.From the collection of Capt. Thomas C. Edrington III, USN. Contributed by his daughter Kyra Larn Edrington and son Thomas C. Edrington IV.
BB-34 New York202kThree Kingfishers aboard New York (BB-34) while anchored at Casco Bay, Maine on 16 June 1943.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-34 New York64k New York class line drawing, 11/43.Courtesy of Joe Radigan.
BB-34 New York755k New York (BB-34) probably in 1944 in Measure 22.USN photo courtesy Pieter Bakels.
BB-34 New York242kOS2U Kingfisher aboard New York (BB-34) in June 1944. Note the depth charge under the port wing. USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-34 New York162k New York (BB-34) as she appeared in June, 1944.USN photo.
BB-34 New York124kDrawing prepared by the Bureau of Ships for Camouflage Measure 31a, Design 8B intended for the battleships New York (BB-34) and Texas (BB-35). This plan, approved by Captain Torvald A. Solberg, USN, is dated 11 October 1944. It shows the ship's starboard side, exposed decks and superstructure ends. New York wore this pattern in late 1944 and early 1945. Texas was painted in it for a brief period during the final part of 1944. Official USN photo # 19-N-73641, from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.
BB-34 New York117kDrawing prepared by the Bureau of Ships for Camouflage Measure 31a, Design 8B intended for the battleships New York (BB-34) and Texas (BB-35). This plan, approved by Captain Torvald A. Solberg, USN, is dated 11 October 1944. It shows the ship's port side, exposed decks and superstructure ends. New York wore this pattern in late 1944 and early 1945. Texas was painted in it for a brief period during the final part of 1944. Official USN photo # 19-N-73640, from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.
BB-34 New York387kForward view of the New York (BB-34) off Hampton Roads, Virginia on 14 November 1944 escorted by tugs. She had just completed a refit at Norfolk Navy Yard which included new 3" gun director (Mark 50) with the conical - scanning type MK.10Mod.5, with 45in dish giving a better performance - 15,000yds on a bomber; one above the bridge and the other atop her stub mainmast, & MK[1].3 Main Battery Fire Control antenna, 20mm A.A. gunarray along main deck edge is clearly seen here too. Getting her ready for Iwo Jima and Okinawa.Text courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
USN photo # 80-G- 289893 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-34 New York493kStern starboard view of the ship off Hampton Roads, Virginia on 14 November 1944 escorted by tugs. She had just completed a refit at Norfolk Navy Yard which included new 3" gun directors (Mark 50) one above the bridge and the other atop her stub mainmast. 20mm A.A. gun array along main deck edge is clearly seen here too. Text courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
USN photo # 80-G- 289894 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-34 New York324kBroadside photo of New York (BB-34) off Norfolk VA., on 14 November 1944, photographed at an altitude of 200 feet. USN photo # 80-G- 289889 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-34 New York340kGrainy stern photo of New York (BB-34) off Norfolk VA., on 14 November 1944, photographed at an altitude of 200 feet. USN photo # 80-G- 289891 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-34 New York320kBow on view of New York (BB-34) off Norfolk VA., on 14 November 1944, photographed at an altitude of 200 feet. USN photo # 80-G- 289892 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-34 New York200k New York (BB-34) somewhere in 1944, showing details of her boat crane with atop a MK.51 director for the below quad. 40mm mount.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-34 New York80kPhotographed in 1944-45, while painted in camouflage Measure 31a/8B.USNHC # NH 63525, now in the collections of the National Archives. Photo i.d. text courtesy of Aryeh Wetherhorn (USN / Israeli Navy /Retired.
BB-34 New York52k New York (BB-34) underway off shore, circa early 1945. She is wearing Camouflage Measure 31a, Design 8B. This photograph was released on 26 January 1946 with an announcement that New York was to be used as an atomic bomb target. It was, however, taken about a year earlier. Official USN photo # NH 104833, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.
BB-34 New York125kThe New York (BB-34) sailed 21 November for the West Coast, arriving San Pedro 6 December for gunnery training in preparation for amphibious operations. She departed San Pedro 12 January 1945, called at Pearl Harbor, and was diverted to Eniwetok to survey screw damage.
She appears here accompanied by a Fletcher class Destroyer when she was making her way across the Pacific.
Photo by Joseph Zayak (Vinny), former PFC, USMC, courtesy of his son Joseph Zayak.
Text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-34 New York133kLooking down from the forecastle of the New York (BB-34) as she makes her way through the Pacific to the war zone. Photo by Joseph Zayak (Vinny), former PFC, USMC, courtesy of his son Joseph Zayak.
BB-34 New York150kProbably somewhere off San Pedro between 6 December & 12 January 1945, for gunnery training in preparation for amphibious operations. Here her crew trains on the 20 mm Oerlikon guns.Photo by Joseph Zayak (Vinny), former PFC, USMC, courtesy of his son Joseph Zayak.
BB-34 New York118kProbably somewhere off San Pedro between 6 December & 12 January 1945, for gunnery training in preparation for amphibious operations. The fire from her 5"/51 is visible past the tubs of the 20 mm Oerlikon guns.Photo by Joseph Zayak (Vinny), former PFC, USMC, courtesy of his son Joseph Zayak.
BB-34 New York114kProbably somewhere off San Pedro between 6 December & 12 January 1945, for gunnery training in preparation for amphibious operations. The fire from her main 14"/45 is visible beneath the legs of her tripod mast.Photo by Joseph Zayak (Vinny), former PFC, USMC, courtesy of his son Joseph Zayak.
BB-34 New York155kLoading 14"/45 ammunition aboard the New York (BB-34) somewhere off San Pedro between 6 December & 12 January 1945, for gunnery training in preparation for amphibious operations. Photo by Joseph Zayak (Vinny), former PFC, USMC, courtesy of his son Joseph Zayak.
Text & photo i.d. courtesy of Joe Perchetti.
BB-34 New York63kBombarding Japanese defenses on Iwo Jima, 16 February 1945. She has just fired the left-hand 14"/45 gun of Number Four turret. View looks aft, on the starboard side. Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-308952, now in the collections of the National Archives.
Insert photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-34 New York63k New York (BB-34) inboard profile, 1945. Photo and text courtesy of U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
Iwo Jima76kPhoto taken from Vicksburg (CL-86) of the battleships Idaho (BB-42), Tennessee (BB-43), and New York (BB-34) (on right), during the bombardment of Iwo Jima, February 1945. Courtesy of modelwarships.com & submitted by Joesph Macdonald.
BB-43 Tennessee 76k Oil on canvas painting by the artist Anthony Saunders entitled "Tennessee (BB-43) During the Landings at Iwo Jima."
In February 1945, 850 square miles of volcanic rock became the most strategically important island in the South Pacific. From Iwo Jima heavy bombers would be able to raid Japanese cities almost at will. Even with its overwhelming military might, the Americans would have to pay a heavy price for such a seemingly small island. The battleship New York (BB-34) is behind the Tennessee.
Text and drawing courtesy of naval-art.com
BB-34 New York155kLoading a casualty aboard a strecher. Photo by Joseph Zayak (Vinny), former PFC, USMC, courtesy of his son Joseph Zayak.
BB-34 New York159kLeaving Iwo Jima, New York (BB-34) at last repaired her propellers at Manus. She appears here at ABSD-4, some time in early March 1945 with her crew scraping & repainting her. Photo by Joseph Zayak (Vinny), former PFC, USMC, courtesy of his son Joseph Zayak.
BB-34 New York117k New York (BB-34) appears here at ABSD-4, some time in early March 1945.Photo by Joseph Zayak (Vinny), former PFC, USMC, courtesy of his son Joseph Zayak.
BB-34 New York123kI believe the officer speaking at the microphone is the captain of the New York (BB-34) & his XO who looks like the actor Lee Marvin is to his right. Probably taken on the occasion of the burial at sea for the three sailors who appear in the two photos below. Photo by Joseph Zayak (Vinny), former PFC, USMC, courtesy of his son Joseph Zayak.
BB-34 New York127kThe men whose draped bodies are seen in the photos were not crew members of the New York (BB-34). They wrere transferred to the New York for treatment of their wounds suffered when their vessel, possibly an LCI was hit by Japanese shore battery.Photo by Joseph Zayak (Vinny), former PFC, USMC, courtesy of his son Joseph Zayak. Photo i.d. & text courtesy of Peter Pane.
BB-34 New York117kBurial at sea for three sailors. The first casualty is consigned to the sea.Photo by Joseph Zayak (Vinny), former PFC, USMC, courtesy of his son Joseph Zayak.
BB-34 New York123k"Somewhere in the South Pacific", author unknown. Photo by Joseph Zayak (Vinny), former PFC, USMC, courtesy of his son Joseph Zayak.
BB-34 New York134kThe New York (BB-34) is shown here off Okinawa, which she reached 27 March to begin 76 consecutive days of action. She fired preinvasion and diversionary bombardments, covered landings, and gave days and nights of close support to troops advancing ashore. She did not go unscathed; a kamikaze grazed her 14 April, demolishing her spotting plane on its catapult. Photo by Joseph Zayak (Vinny), former PFC, USMC, courtesy of his son Joseph Zayak.
BB-34 New York18kDamage from a kamikazeattack on the New York (BB-34), 14 April 1945 off the coast of Okinawa. Photo from WW II Damage Reports, courtesy of NavSea / dcfp.navy.mil.
BB-34 New York200k New York (BB-34) left Okinawa 11 June to regun at Pearl Harbor. Photo by Joseph Zayak (Vinny), former PFC, USMC, courtesy of his son Joseph Zayak.
Diablo811kDiablo (SS-479) as seen from the Euryale (AS-22) at Pearl Harbor, summer 1945.
What appears to be the fire control mast of the battleship New York (BB-34) rises up in the background. She left Okinawa 11 June to re gun at Pearl Harbor. The Euryale was at Pearl from 6 May – 16 August 1945.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Darryl L. Baker, Dave Johnston, USNR, & Robert Morgan.
USN photo # 80-G-0837 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
Post War - Sinking
BB-34 New York83kArriving off New York City to take part in Navy Day celebrations, circa 19 October 1945.Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-K-14562, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-34 New York2.45kNew York City (19 October 1945): SC/2 Chester Smigielski, of Chelsea, Massachusetts, holds up an appetizing hunk of meat for spectators to see during the public inspection tour of the battleship New York (BB-34), which docked in New York this morning. The public was permitted aboard in the afternoon. Photo courtesy of Acme Newspictures via Bill Gonyo.
Navy Day467kSearchlights aboard the aircraft carrier Enterprise (CV-6); and battleships Missouri (BB-63) and New York (BB-34) provide fans of light from their berths in the Hudson River as the biggest Navy Day celebration in NY history commences, New York, New York, 26 October 1945.Photo by Underwood Archives/Getty Images, courtesy of gettyimages.com.
BB-63 Missouri3.23k"On Navy Day in 1945, a seven-mile line of U.S. Navy warships anchored in the Hudson River and some 1,200 Navy planes flew overhead in commemoration of the event."
Tugboats and U.S. Navy warships pictured in the Hudson River with the New York City skyline in the background on the occasion of Navy Day on 27 October 1945. Visible in the foreground are the anchored heavy cruisers Augusta (CA 31), Helena (CA-75), and Macon (CA-132); carriers Midway (CVB-41) and Enterprise (CV-6); and battleships Missouri (BB-63) and New York (BB-34).
USN photo & text courtesy of National Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 2001.256.009.
BB-34 New York84kDetail from a panoramic view of the US fleet under review by President Harry S Truman, New York City, 27 October 1945. This segment includes the battleship New York (BB-34) (left) and cruiser Helena (CA-75) (right).Photo & text courtesy of William T. Barr via Joel Shepherd & cv6.org, submitted by Mike Green.
BB-34 New York252kPresident Harry S Truman waves from the Missouri (BB-63). The New York (BB-34) is in the background and off the bow.USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-34 New York1.90kShips to be used for atomic bomb tests at Operations Crossroads, Bikini Atoll, Marshall Islands, 14 January 1946.USN photo # 80-G-701808, courtesy of the National Museum of the U.S. Navy, courtesy of flickr.com.
BB-34 New York249kView from mast. February, 1946 at New York. New York (BB-34) had arrived there on 19 October. Here she prepared to serve as target ship in operation "Crossroads," the Bikini atomic tests, sailing 4 March 1946 for the West Coast. USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels. Photo Serial # 382-46-1.
BB-34 New York256kView from foremast, port side, looking Fwd. February, 1946.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels. Photo Serial # 382-46-2.
BB-34 New York320k View from mast, port side, looking aft. February, 1946.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels. Photo Serial # 382-46-3.
BB-34 New York267k View from foremast, Stb.side, looking aft. February, 1946.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels. Photo Serial # 382-46-4.
BB-34 New York320k View from mainmast, looking Fwd., in Measure 21, Navy Blue and Deck Blue. Note the SC-1 floatplanes and the big SK air search set with SG surface search on a topmast. February, 1946.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels. Photo Serial # 382-46-5.
BB-34 New York217kView from mainmast, looking forward. February, 1946. Note the 35-foot motor boat nested inside the 40-foot utility boat, the 26-foot motor whale boat to starboard. USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels. Photo Serial # 382-46-7.
BB-34 New York347k N.Y.Navy Yard, 1946. USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-34 New York6.80k New York (BB-34) starts on her way to the Marshall Islands for atomic bomb tests, 26 January 1946.
This PDF contains 4 newspaper clippings of the history of the New York from 1945 - 46.
Photo & PDF courtesy of Ron Reeves HTC (ret.)
BB-34 New York191kView from mainmast, looking aft., showing the now removed A.A.guns and splintershields. Only a few life rafts remain reflecting the postwar reduced crew. February, 1946.USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels. Photo Serial # 382-46-8.
BB-34 New York45kPhoto taken on 4 March 1946, while moored off Philadelphia Navy Yard.USN photo.
BB-34 New York235kA marked & measured New York (BB-34), possibly at the Philadelphia Navy Yard after March 1946 being prepped for use at Bikini as a target ship. USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-33 Arkansas 45k The Arkansas (BB-33) is in the left hand corner of this photo with other test ships at the Bikini Bomb Test, 1946. I believe the New York (BB-34) is in the center, and the Pennsylvania (BB-38) is to her immediate right. Courtesy of submarinesailor.com.
BB-38 Pennsylvania81kBikini Bomb Test, 1946. New York (BB-34) is in the center & Pennsylvania (BB-38) is to the right. USN Photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
Bikini 1.00k The underwater test at Bikini shows its terric power amid the anchored vessels, made bare seconds after its release. Photo courtesy of courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
Inset USN photos courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-34 New York73kThe Fleet Ocean Tug Achomawi (ATF-148) washing down New York (BB-34) at Bikini Atoll in July 1946 after one of the two atomic bomb tests the old battleship endured.Photo & text courtesy of Alan Owens via Gary Priolo.
BB-34 New York95k New York (BB-34) is shown here being flushed with an anti-radiation bath after being used as a target at Bikini Atoll.USNI / USN photo.
BB-34 New York80k New York (BB-34) is shown here on 15 August 1946 at Pearl Harbor after she had been towed back from Bikini.
Photo taken from the Allen M. Sumner (DD-692) as Sumner was returning from Operation Crossroads.
Copy by Arne Schumacher.
BB-34 New York82k New York (BB-34) is shown here on 15 August 1946 at Pearl Harbor after she had been towed back from Bikini.
Photo taken from the Allen M. Sumner (DD-692) as Sumner was returning from Operation Crossroads.
Copy by Arne Schumacher.
BB-34 New York366kStern portside view of the New York (BB-34) at Pearl Harbor, January 1948. Photographer: Elliot Elisofon, courtesy of life.com.
BB-34 New York189kLooking very forlorn, the New York (BB-34) awaits her end at Pearl Harbor, January 1948. Photographer: Elliot Elisofon, courtesy of life.com.
BB-34 New York489kEx- New York (BB-34) and Ex-Nevada (BB-36) anchored at Pearl Harbor on 8 June 1948. Both had served as targets in the Bikini atomic bomb tests two years previously, and will be sunk in ordnance tests a few weeks after the photo was taken. Source: United States National Archives, Photo No. 80-G-498043 courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-34 New York112kEx- New York (BB-34) is towed from Pearl Harbor to be sunk as a target, 6 July 1948. Conserver (ARS-39), at left, is the main towing ship, assisted by two harbor tugs on New York's port side.Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-498120, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-34 New York606kAerial view of Ex- New York (BB-34) being sunk as a target vessel off Hawaii on 8 July 1948. Source: United States National Archives, Photo No. 80-G-498138 courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-34 New York617kBow view of Ex- New York (BB-34) afire and listing while being sunk as a target vessel off Hawaii on 8 July 1948. Source: United States National Archives, Photo No. 80-G-498140 courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-34 New York534kBoxer (CV-21) and Princeton (CV-37) underway and steam past the capsized hull of Ex- New York (BB-34) off Hawaii on 8 July 1948. The ship was sunk by U.S. Navy ships and aircraft during weapons tests. Note oil slick coming from the sinking battleship.Source: United States National Archives, Photo No. 80-G-498136 courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-34 New York145kToo radioactive for scrapping or a memorial in her home state, the ship was sunk as a target on 8 July 1948 off Hawaii. She is shown here bottom up in her final moments.USN photo.
(NISMF)376kA guest studies a painting depicting the history of battleships. The artwork was painted by George Skybeck and presented to the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association during their annual banquet at Honolulu, Hawaii, on 8 December 1991. USN photo # DN-SC-92-05391, by PHC Carolyn Harris, from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection, courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil.
World War II Memorial371kA quote made by Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz is inscribed on a granite wall at the National World War II Memorial located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Fleet Adm. Nimitz was the United States signatory to the surrender terms aboard the battleship Missouri (BB-63) in Tokyo Bay, Japan on 2 September 1945, thus ending World War II. Established by the American Battle Monuments Commission, the memorial honors all military veterans of World War II, the citizens on the home front, the nation at large, and the high moral purpose and idealism that motivated the nation's call to arms. On 29 May 2004, the memorial was formally dedicated with an estimated 200,000 people expected to attend, and includes 100,000 visiting veterans of all wars.USN photo # N-0295M-011 by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Daniel J. McLain, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
BB-34 New York145kCommemorative postal cover on the occasion of New York's (BB-34) 90th anniversary, 15 April 2004.Photo courtesy of Jack Treutle.

USS NEW YORK BB-34 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry
(Located On The Hazegray & Underway Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)

Crew Contact And Reunion Information

Contact Name: Mr. Kenneth C Sparks
Address: 4747 Ormonde Dr, Cazenovia, NY, 13035-9348
Phone: 315-655-3842
E-mail: kenbarbcaz@usadatanet.net



Note About Contacts.

The contact listed, Was the contact at the time for this ship when located. If another person now is the contact, E-mail me and I will update this entry. These contacts are compiled from various sources over a long period of time and may or may not be correct. Every effort has been made to list the newest contact if more than one contact was found.


Additional Resources
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