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NavSource Online: Battleship Photo Archive

BB-35 USS TEXAS

Radio Call Sign: November - Alpha - Delta - Victor


New York Class Battleship: Displacement 27,000 Tons, Dimensions, 573' (oa) x 95' 3" x 29' 7" (Max). Armament 10x 14"/45 21 x 5"/51, 56 x 4 x 21" tt. Armor, 12" Belt, 14" Turrets, 3" Decks, 12" Conning Tower. Machinery, 28,100 IHP; Vertical, triple expansion engines, 2 screws. Speed, 21 Knots, Crew 1052.

Operational and Building Data: Laid down by Newport News, Shipbuilding, Newport News, VA., April 17, 1911. Launched May 18, 1912. Commissioned March 12, 1914. Decommissioned April 21, 1948. Stricken April 21, 1948.
Fate: Preserved as a memorial, San Jacinto Battlefield, 3523 Highway 134, La Porte TX, 77571.Texas.
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SizeImage DescriptionContributed
By And/Or Copyright
Keel Laying / Commissioning
1911 - 1914

BB-35 Texas77k 1 July 1911 photo of the Texas (BB-35) being built. Sub-assemblies and machinery area bulkheads are in place.USN photo contributed by Mike Green, courtesy of Leeward Publications.
BB-35 Texas57kLooking forward from the stern, this 2 October 1911 photo shows the angled framing of the tiller room. USN photo contributed by Mike Green, courtesy of Leeward Publications.
BB-35 Texas69k 12 January 1912 photo of Texas (BB-35) being built. This photo shows the second deck around #4 and #5 barbettes. The tiller room at the bottom edge of the photo has been completely plated over. USN photo contributed by Mike Green, courtesy of Leeward Publications.
BB-35 Texas89k Texas (BB-35) on 2 April 1912 almost hidden by scaffolding. The ramp at the left is used by mules hauling material to the main deck. USN photo contributed by Mike Green, courtesy of Leeward Publications.
BB-35 Texas 4.88k Ranchman's Daughter To Christen Warship.Image and text provided by University of California, Riverside.
Photo & text by The San Francisco Call.(San Francisco [Calif.]) 1895-1913, 29 April 1912, Image 9, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas 2.00k BATTLESHIP TEXAS (BB-35) READY TO TAKE TO THE WATER AT NEWPORT NEWS YARDSImage and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota.
Photo by Bismarck Daily Tribune. (Bismarck, Dakota [N.D.]) 1881-1916, 20 May 1912, Image 1, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas117kMiss Claudia Lyon, sponsor of the Texas (BB-35), holding her bouquet.Digital ID # ggbain 10500, LC-B2-2411-8. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection.
BB-35 Texas483kLaunch of Texas (BB-35), Sec. of Navy Meyer and Claudia Lyon. Digital ID # ggbain 10503, LC-B2-2411-12. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection.
BB-35 Texas341k Texas (BB-35) afloat after launch. Photo courtesy of old-picture.com.
BB-35 Texas 970k World's Greatest Battleship Launched at Newport News.Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA & University of Oregon, Knight Library; Eugene, OR.
Photo from The Times Dispatch. (Richmond, Va.) 1903-1914, 19 May 1912, Image 36, & Medford Mail Tribune. (Medford, Or.) 1909-1989, 24 May 1912, SECOND EDITION, Image 1 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas 885k First Pictures of Launching of Dreadnought Texas (BB-35)
First Row, Left to 'Right: The Misses Garland Bonner, Mary Colquitt, Claudia Lyon, Ura Link, and Mae Tuny. Second Row, Left to Right Mrs. 0. B. Colquitt, Col. B. F. Bonner, and Mrs.B. F. Bonner.
The Times Herewith Prints the First Pictures of the Launching of the Battleship Texas at Newport News Yesterday. This Vessel Is the Largest Dreadnought of the United States Navy. She Was Christened By Miss Claudia Lyon, Daughter of Cecil Lyon, of Sherman, Texas.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 19 May 1912, Sunday Evening EDITION, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas149kA workman dangles from the bow of the Texas (BB-35) just above the sponsor's platform for the launching of the battleship sometime shortly before 18 May 1912.Digital ID # ggbain 10418, LC-B2-2401-3. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection, courtesy of Tom Kermen.
BB-35 Texas4.28kBIGGEST UNITED STATES BATTLESHIP LAUNCHED SATURDAY AND GIRL WHO CHRISTENED IT.
The Texas (BB-35) is of 27,000 tons normal displacement and is 673 feet long. Her sister ship, the New York (BB-34), is now being built at the New York navy yard. These two are the first to be built under the eight hour law, which government figures show increased the cost 21 per cent.
Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA.
Text courtesy of the The Seattle Star. , (Seattle, Wash.) 1899-1947, 20 May 1912, Image 6, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas12.5kThe Texas (BB-35) slides down the launching ways on 18 May 1912.Digital ID # ggbain 10502, LC-B2-2411-11. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection, courtesy of Tom Kermen.
Insert PDF image and text provided by University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Library, Urbana, IL.
Text courtesy of the Rock Island Argus., (Rock Island, Ill.) 1893-1920, 24 May 1912, HOME EDITION, Image 14, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas66k Texas (BB-35) on 2 October 1912 being fitted out. A floating derrick is being used to install deck equipment. USN photo contributed by Mike Green, courtesy of Leeward Publications.
BB-35 Texas84k Making 15.151 knots during the 9th run of her standardization trials, 23 October 1913. Note incomplete status of her hull paint forward and unfinished mainmast.Official USN photo USNHC # NH 61713, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-35 Texas747kTexas (BB-35) standardization trial, 27 October 1913; Run # 24, Speed 21.792 knots. US National Archives photo # 80G-1035094 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert, Webmaster & Editor ModelWarships.com
BB-35 Texas 633k NEW DREADNOUGHT MAKES RECORD IN SPEED TRIALS
The new dreadnought, Texas (BB-35), the newest and largest addition to the American navy, had her recent speed trials during the battle practice of the Atlantic fleet off the Virginia Capes and came up to the requisite tests in good shape. She will be manned by a picked crew from the Idaho (BB-24), thus doing away with the tedious job of training a green crew.
Image and text provided by University of Oregon Libraries; Eugene, OR.
Photo from East Oregonian E.O. (Pendleton, Umatilla Co., Or.) 1888-current, 30 October 1913, DAILY EVENING EDITION, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas 585k TEXAS (BB-35) WORLD'S GREATEST BATTLESHIP, READY FOR SERVICE IN MEXICO
Texas underway under a cloud of coal burning smoke prior to the March 1914 commissioning. The two-level searchlights are not present on the masts but they were at commissioning. Also the construction markings are still visible on the side of the hull.
USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
Text courtesy of Chuck Moore.
PDF Image and text provided by University of Oregon, Knight Library; Eugene, OR.
Photo & text by Medford Mail Tribune. (Medford, Or.) 1909-1989, 04 November 1913, SECOND EDITION, Image 1, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas 656k THE BATTLESHIP TEXAS (BB-35), NAVY'S PRIDE IN A TRIAL RUN OFF THE MAINE COAST
The new battleship Texas is the most powerful vessel in Uncle Sam's navy, and she is the largest. During her test runs off the Maine coast she attained the high speed rate of 22 knots. There is no doubt that the Texas is one of the most formidable fighting craft afloat today. Her bite is much worse than her bark.
Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH.
Photo from The Democratic Banner. (Mt. Vernon, Ohio) 1898-192?, 14 November 1913, Image 2, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas44k Port bow view of Texas (BB-35) on 3 January 1914 showing forward turrets and 5" casemate guns. USN photo contributed by Mike Green, courtesy of Leeward Publications.
BB-35 Texas37k Port stern quarter view of Texas (BB-35) on 3 January 1914. The three aft turrets are visible as well as the stern mounted 5" gun. USN photo contributed by Mike Green, courtesy of Leeward Publications.
BB-35 Texas94kTexas (BB-35) sometime after the October 1913 sea trials and before being commissioned on 12 March 1914. The searchlights were not present during the October 1913 sea trials but they are present in the 12 March 1914 commissioning photo. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Partial text and photo i.d. courtesy of Chuck Moore.
John Hood532kGovenor Oscar Branch Colquitt, of Texas Rangers fame, on board the Texas (BB-35) in 1914. Photo courtesy of SK/3 Tommy Trampp.
Photo added 07/16/15.
John Hood316kTexas (BB-35) sprouts a 13 star flag streamer on her steamer. Photo courtesy of SK/3 Tommy Trampp.
Photo added 07/16/15.
BB-35 Texas76kOil on canvas painting by the artist J.Lau entitled "Texas, circa pre WW I." Size in cm: 39 x 56, for sale, contact Asmund Agdestein.
The painting depicts an American battleship (cage masts) with two curved roofed turrets in the No. 1 and No. 2 positions which were used only for the 14" gun turrets of the New York (BB-34/35), Oklahoma (BB-36/7) and Pennsylvania (BB-38/9) classes. Oklahoma class would have a 3-gun turret in the No. 1 position while the Pennsylvania class would have 3 guns in each turret. The painting seems to show only 2 guns per turret; this leave us with the New York class (BB-34/35): New York & Texas.
It is a pre-WWI view. No evidence of a flying-off platform anywhere, and none of the wartime superstructure additions are present. If the stack bands are really on the second funnel (they look like they might have been crudely added to the photo after it was taken), the date would be about 1914.
I would say with 95% certainty that the painting depicts the Texas. The smoke from the funnels obscures much detail of the mast structure but I can make out what should be to searchlights on the foremast mounted one above the other. This arrangement would mean the Texas. The New York carried her search lights on a single platform mounted side by side on both mast which in this painting would be visible projecting from the sides of the masts at about the same level as the 3" guns mentioned above.
Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn & Chuck Haberlein. Photo courtesy of Asmund Agdestein.
BB-35 Texas250kTexas (BB-35) on 24 March 1914 with an unknown battleship moored alongside and the cage masts of another looming over the foreground.
The “turtle-back” style of turret is particular to the New York, Oklahoma and Pennsylvania classes and of these only the New York class have 2 funnels. Ergo if Texas is in the foreground it must be New York (BB-34) on the other side. In pre-war photos the easy telltale for distinguishing between these two sisters is the searchlights mounted on the masts; Texas carries them one above the other and New York carries them on a single level. This arrangement changes on Texas immediately after the war.
Digital ID # ggbain 16025v, LC-B2-3055-13. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection. Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-35 Texas227kWith her commissioning flag slightly bowed, the Texas (BB-35) is moored dockside on 24 March 1914. Note the trolley tracks alongside for the movement of cranes and the boarding ladder dockside. Digital ID # ggbain 16026v, LC-B2-3055-14. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection.
BB-35 Texas3.34kBiggest of Our Battleships Passing Up the East River.
"Birdseye view of the battleship Texas (BB-35), showing the mighty guns that make it one of the most deadly engines of destruction afloat."
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Insert PDF text courtesy of the The Evening World., (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, 27 March 1914, Final Edition, Image 2, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Photo by International News Agency.
Text courtesy from The War of the Nations (New York) N.Y. Times, 31 December 1919, Page 376, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas 1.08k BATTLESHIP TEXAS (BB-35) GOING UNDER MANHATTAN BRIDGE.
Newest Sea Fighter at Navy Yard for Finishing Touches.
YEOMAN LEAVING WITH THE BATTLESHIPS MASCOTS
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 28 March 1914, Image 20, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Insert photo # LC-B2-3055-12 & text from George Grantham Bain Collection (Library of Congress) via flickr.com.
BB-35 Texas136kCapt. Albert Weston Grant commanded the battleship Texas (BB-35) from March 1914 to September 1915. Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress & submitted by Bill Gonyo.
BB-35 Texas 980k BOY SCOUTS RAID NAVY YARD, CAPTURE BATTLESHIP TEXAS (BB-35) . Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 07 April 1914, Image 6, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Vera Cruz Incident
BB-34 New York727kBATTLESHIPS TEXAS (BB-35) AND NEW YORK (BB-34) GETTING READY TO SAIL FOR MEXICO
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from the The Evening World. (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, 15 April 1914, Final Night, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas 1.79k NO EASY TASK FOR UNCLE SAM TO BLOCKADE MEXICO
Possible Shutting Up of Mexican Line of Coast an Arduous Task, as Shown by Experiences of Seventy Years Ago
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, 19 April 1914, THIRD SECTION, Image 26, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas 962k Battleship Texas (BB-35) and view of gun turret. Image and text provided by University of Hawaii at Manoa; Honolulu, HI.
Photo & text by Honolulu Star-Bulletin. (Honolulu [Oahu, Hawaii) 1912-current, 20 April 1914, 3:30 Edition, Image 8, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas 564k CAPTAIN CLEAVES INSPECTING TEXAS (BB-35), NOW BEING RUSHED INTO C0MMISSI0N.Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH.
Photo & text by The Democratic Banner.(Mt. Vernon, Ohio) 1898-192?, 21 April 1914, Image 1, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas 831kJACKIES FROM THE TEXAS (BB-35) AT LANDING FORCE DRILL
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from the The Washington Herald.(Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, 26 April 1914, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas92kTexas (BB-35) appears in a stereoscopic color tinted photo by Enrique Miller Jr, circa 1914.Courtesy of Paul Petosky.
U.S. Atlantic Fleet battleships71k U.S. Atlantic Fleet battleships steaming toward Mexican waters in 1914. Photograph copyrighted in 1914 by E. Muller, Jr., and Pach.
The following battleships that were dispatched to Mexican waters included the:
Ohio (BB-12), Virginia (BB-13), Nebraska (BB-14), Georgia (BB-15), New Jersey (BB-16), Rhode Island (BB-17), Connecticut (BB-18), Louisiana (BB-19), Vermont (BB-20), Kansas (BB-21), Minnesota (BB-22), Mississippi (BB-23), Idaho (BB-24), New Hampshire (BB-25), South Carolina (BB-26), Michigan (BB-27), Delaware (BB-28), North Dakota (BB-29), Florida (BB-30), Utah (BB-31), Wyoming (BB-32), Arkansas (BB-33), New York (BB-34) & Texas (BB-35).
In insets are (left to right):
Rear Admiral Henry T. Mayo,
Rear Admiral Frank F. Fletcher,
Rear Admiral Charles J. Badger.
USNHC # NH 60322.
BB-35 Texas 953k SILVER SERVICE PRESENTED TO BATTLESHIP TEXAS (BB-35)
School Children Galore at Presentation in Galveston of Elaborate Gift of People of State After Which Battleship Is Named
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 08 November 1914, Image 7, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Inset photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
COLQUITT177kPostcard photo of the Texas (BB-35) underway sometime after 1914.
Photo is attributed by Clarke Z. Muller.
Photo courtesy of SK/3 Tommy Trampp.
Mid 19 Teens
BB-35 Texas 936kAMERICAN GUNNER WINS WORLD RECORD
William Ruf, gun pointer on the battleship Texas (BB-35),on furlough home here, has received word from the Navy Department that he set a new world's record in big gun marksmanship off the Virginia Capes in recent practice. He scored eight straight hits with a 14-inch gun at a moving target twelve miles away. He receives a cash prize of $20 for this feat.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from the The Washington Herald.(Washington, D.C.) 1906-1939, 21 February 1915, SOCIETY SECTION, Image 21, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas 418kDOLLING UP FOR THE BIG DAY.
Painting the main fighting mast of the big Texas (BB-35) to make her ready for the review.
Photo by Underwood & Underwood.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 11 May 1915, Night Extra, Image 16, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic Fleet250k OUTLINED AGAINST A CURTAIN OF DARKNESS
A fleet of destroyers and torpedo-boats has now arrived at New York to join the heavy ships of the line. Altogether, about 50 vessels will be assembled when the ceremonies began next Monday. It is promised that the strained international relations will have no effect on the parade.
Photo by International News Service.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo & text by Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 13 May 1915, Night Extra, Image 16, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet862kTEXAS (BB-35) BOXERS NEED NO RING
They spar on a spar raised above the deck between the great guns.
Photo by International News Service
Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 14 May 1915, Image 4, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas935k"We Are Ready," Said Uncle Sam's Jackies Sitting on the Texas' (BB-35) 14-inch Rifle.Image and text provided by University of South Carolina; Columbia, SC.
Photo from The Intelligencer. (Anderson, S.C.) 1915-1917, 15 May 1915, Image 5, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas 418kTorpedoes & tubes as mounted ready for action on board the Texas (BB-35).
One of the sights which drew the fascinated gaze of visitors to the ships of the North Atlantic fleet, at New York, was the deck torpedo tubes of the dreadnought Texas.
The Picture on the right above shows the bottom half of the hinged tubes, raised to show the deadly missiles lying in their resting places like larvae in a wasp's nest. The torpedoes are set in motion by compressed air, their course being kept true by means of compressed air from their propellers and gyroscopic attachments.
On the left is a typical torpedo of the short, blunt type favored by the American Navy.
It's probably a case of the reporter/editor cutting corners because they don't think any one knows better. While the Texas / New York were originally armed with 4 21" torpedo tubes mounted in pairs, port and starboard, they were not deck mounts but located in the hull below the water line roughly in line with the Nos. 3 & 4 5"/51 mounts. Notice the 2 ports in the side of the ship below, these as the torpedo tubes.
It is possible that the other photo on the same page of the newspaper which shows a torpedo displayed on the deck of a ship might have been taken aboard the Texas but not certain. The torpedo tubes above are most probably photographed aboard a Cassin/Alwin class or O'Brien/Tucker class destroyer.
Image provided by: Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from the Evening Public Ledger, (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 18 May 1915, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-35 Texas 722k FUTURE JACK TAR inspecting one of the big guns on Uncle Sam's dreadnought, the Texas (BB-35).Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE.
Photo & text by Omaha Daily Bee. (Omaha [Neb.]) 187?-1922, 18 May 1915, Image 1, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas4.26k"The Holland - America Liner Ryndam, settling low in the water after her collision with the Cuneo, convoyed by the battleship Texas (BB-35), from which this photo was taken." Photo from Brown Bros.
Text courtesy of N.Y. Times, 6 June 1915, Page 8, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
John Hood177kCaptain John Hood was the Commanding Officer of the battleship Texas (BB-35) deck in 1915-1916. During his command the Texas won the "Red E" for excellence in engineering efficiency. Photo #15824v courtesy of the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
BB-35 Texas90kTexas (BB-35) in drydock, with painting stages rigged along her waterline area. Anchors and chain are on the drydock floor. The image reverse is marked "circa 1916". Photographed by Charland. The original image is printed on postal card ("AZO") stock. USNHC photo # NH 103092, Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2005.
BB-35 Texas720kDeck cleared for action, #4 turret Texas (BB-35), 1916. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas878k#1 & 2 turrets. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas 1.03kIN the present naval maneuvers, a three inch gun, mounted to give it a high degree of elevation, will be tried out aboard the United States battleship Texas (BB-35) for war on hostile aircraft. If the trials prove a success all warships in the navy will be equipped in similar manner. The rifle fires thirty shots a minute and requires a crew of seven men to operate it. The picture shows the gun and platform on the Texas. Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from the The Sun.(New York, [N.Y.]) 1916-1920, 19 August 1916, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas701kTexas (BB-35) at Hampton Roads, VA. on 13 December 1916. US National Archives photo # 80G-1035095 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert, Webmaster & Editor ModelWarships.com
BB-35 Texas110kCaptain Victor Blue, USN. He was the third commanding Officer of the Battleship Texas (BB-35), from 14 August 1916 to 31 December 1918. Photo taken on board. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-35 Texas122kTexas (BB-35) heads upriver towards the New York Navy Yard. Topmasts are down to allow passage under the Brooklyn Bridge. Notice 5"/51 caliber anti-destroyer gun mounted at her stern. This, along with all the other hull mounted guns, were eventually eliminated due to their closeness to the waterline. They were wet even in moderate seas.
In this photo all 19 original hull guns are still present. The first removals were in October 1917, per the armament page of the ship's deck log.
Even on builders trials she was caring search lights on the king-post platforms which are empty in the photo.
USN photo.
Partial text and photo i.d. courtesy of Chuck Moore & Chris Hoehn.
Over There
1917 - 1919

Almost Unknown450kNEW BATTLESHIP TEXAS (BB-35) SEEN PROM THE MANHATTAN BRIDGE.
This 37,000 ton superdreadnought, most efficient of the first line, gained many of her records in firing at the wreck of the old Texas (renamed the San Marcos) in Chesapeake Bay. The photograph is one of the most unusual ever taken.
REMNANTS OF THE OLD TEXAS, TARGET USED IN FIRE CONTROL TESTS OF THE NEW NAVY. NOTE THE OLD MILITARY MAST, THOUGH RIDDLED BY SHELL FIRE STILL IS STANDING, WHILE AT THE RIGHT THE BASE ONLY OF ONE OF THE NEW BASKET MASTS IS LEFT.
Photo by Enrique Mueller Jr.
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation
Photo by The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1916-1920, 07 January 1917, Section 4 Pictorial Magazine, Image 47, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas118kPort side bow photo of the Texas (BB-35) circa 1917 in the East River, NYC.Photo courtesy of Photos of the Great War website thanks to Ray Mentzer & submitted by Bill Gonyo &
Photograph by Edward M. Mitchell courtesy of Tommy Trampp.
BB-35 Texas 3.05k Texas (BB-35) circa 1917. Photo copyright 1917 C.E. Waterman with another copyright O.W. Waterman, Hampton VA., courtesy of David A. Jones MMCM(SW) USN Retired.
BB-35 Texas 3.38k Crew of the Texas (BB-35), circa 1917. Photo copyright 1917 C.E. Waterman with another copyright O.W. Waterman, Hampton VA., courtesy of David A. Jones MMCM(SW) USN Retired.
BB-35 Texas66kTHE DEFENCE OF NEW YORK
The Texas (BB-35), one of our most powerful fighting ships.
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from the The Sun.(New York, [N.Y.]) 1916-1920, 11 February 1917, Section 5 Special Feature Supplement, Image 45, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas864kNEW YORK EXPOSED TO BOMBING BY HOSTILE AIR CRAFT.
Peary's Startling Statement of Possibility of Such a Raid Borne Out by Known Facts of the Wonderful Development of the Fighting Airship
ONE OF OUR ALL TOO FEW ANTI-AIR CRAFT GUNS ABOARD THE BATTLESHIP TEXAS (BB-35)
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from the The Sun.(New York, [N.Y.]) 1916-1920, 04 March 1917, Section 5 Special Feature Supplement, Image 49, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas 481kUS BATTLESHIP TEXAS (BB-35)
Notice the stern gun.
Image and text provided by University of New Mexico.
Photo from the The Evening Herald. (Albuquerque, N.M.) 1914-1922, 23 May 1917, Image 4, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas2.57k Hull of Texas (BB-35) shown in dry-dock at New York Navy Yard. The Texas ran aground at Block Island on 27 September 1917. USN photo contributed by Mike Green, courtesy of Leeward Publications.
BB-35 Texas580kPhoto of the Texas (BB-35) getting ready to go "over there".
Photo i.d. is based on the removal of the 2 large vent hatches in the roof of main battery turrets. I located an over head photo of the Texas in 1919 showing the patch in place of these vents on the No. 3 turrets and a couple photos of the fly-off platform on both No. 2 and No. 4 turrets showing it built too close to the Turret roof to allow clearance for the hatch. Additionally numerous photos of the New York (BB-34) including one just prior to her entering the Navy Yard for the 1925 refit showing these hatches still in use (open).
I suspect this modification occurred just prior to departing for England in 1917. The Texas ran aground off Block Island (in Long Island Sound) requiring her to return to the New York Navy Yard for repairs to her hull, delaying her arrival in England till December. As she was laid up the US Navy may taken the opportunity to make additional modifications to her, based on recommendations by the Royal Navy inspection of the ships to be sent to England, that would have delayed the departure of the fleet too long if they had been made on all the ships. As it was the only modifications made to most ships was to remove some of the secondary battery (generally the most forward), add 2 guns for AA defense and to add an enclosed navigation bridge.
Photo courtesy of Dorothy Deina Porter.
Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-35 Texas135kU.S. Atlantic Fleet with the battleship Texas (BB-35) leading. Photo taken in 1917. Digital ID: # cph 3b17917. Photograph submitted by Bill Gonyo.
BB-36 Nevada318kThe Texas (BB-35) with other Battleships of the Atlantic Fleet at Hampton Roads, 1917. Note only 2 guns on No. 1 Turret and the over/under arrangement of the searchlights.
The photo is incorrectly listed in the LOC as the Nevada (BB-36).
Library of Congress photo # LC-DIG-hec-08102 courtesy of the Harris & Ewing Collection.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-35 Texas22kFire and smoke erupt from her turrets while firing a broadside. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas53kCage mast against the sky.USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas36k Fish for dinner? Crewmen wheeling a torpedo across Texas' (BB-35) deck.USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas29kCrewmen bend over shells for Texas (BB-35) main armament during her WW I service. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas2.57kThe bridge.USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas178k "Destroyer Life": Poem by Berton Braley, circa 1918. Illustrated by Chief Quartermaster S.G. Berry, USN, with the flags of the World War I western allies and sketches of contrasting life on board destroyers (at right) with that on board battleships. The Texas (BB-35) is mentioned among the battleships.Photo # NH 75532-KN, courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation, Washington, D.C., 1972.
BB-28 Delaware199k This rare oil painting by American artist Burnell Poole, "The 6th Battle Squadron of the Grand Fleet Leaving the Firth of Forth", is one of less than two dozen paintings owned by the Navy that depicts U.S. naval operations in World War One (WWI). After years of being considered a total loss by Navy Art Gallery curators it has been restored to near perfect condition. The entire process took several months, but the result is the total recovery of a painting that is sure to establish Burnell Poole's name among the best marine painters of the early 20th century.
The composition of the ships of the 6th Battle Squadron during their operational history, appearing in the painting in no particular order were: Delaware (BB-28), Florida (BB-30),Wyoming (BB-32), Arkansas (BB-33), New York (BB-34), Texas (BB-35), & Arizona (BB-39).
Photo and partial text courtesy of Naval Historical Center, Washington, D.C., File photo # N-0000X-001.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 09 June 1918, Image 36, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas59k The Texas (BB-35) in 1918, line drawing by A.L. Raven.
The date is close to November 1918 (for the Pilot House is present) but Texas did not have 3 inch guns atop turret 3, turret 4 and on the superstructure until August 1921. The enclosed torpedo defense platform on the mainmast (the structure below the searchlight platform) was not installed until late 1919 to 1920, as was the foremast. The present hull guns forward were removed in November 1918 and the present middle casemate guns were removed in October 1917. The airplane platform atop Turret 2 should be present for it was installed at the same time as the enclosed Pilot House.
From U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman. Partial text and photo i.d. courtesy of Chuck Moore.
BB-34 New York382k21 November 1918 - U.S. battleships witness surrender of German High Seas fleet at Rosyth, Firth of Forth, Scotland, to U.S. and British fleets.
New York (BB-34), Arkansas (BB-33), Delaware (BB-28), Texas (BB-35), Florida (BB-30), and Wyoming (BB-32).
Text & USN photo courtesy of Pacific Battleship Center - Battleship USS Iowa via Ron Reeves.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Andy McIntosh.
Sixth Battle Squadron72kBattleships of the Sixth Battle Squadron (anchored in column in the left half of the photograph): included the
Florida (BB-30)
Utah (BB-31)
Wyoming (BB-32)
Arkansas (BB-33)
New York (BB-34)
Texas (BB-35)
Nevada (BB-36)
Oklahoma (BB-37)
Pennsylvania (BB-38)
& Arizona (BB-39) at one time or another.
There are only three of the battleships present in this photo at Brest, France, on 13 December 1918. George Washington (ID-3018), which had just carried President Woodrow Wilson from the United States to France, is in the right background.
USNHC # NH 63454 photographed by Zimmer.
BB-35 Texas94k Texas (BB-35) around 26 December 1918 or later for the airplane fly off platform is atop turret (installed 20 October - 4 November 1918), and NYC is in the background. Super firing turrets are equipped with flying off platforms but she wouldn't launch planes until 1919. USN photo by E. Harland, courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Partial text and photo i.d. courtesy of Chuck Moore.
BB-35 Texas73kTexas (BB-35), photo date is 26 December 1918 or later for the airplane flyofff platform is atop turret (installed 20 October - 4 November 1918), and NYC is in the background.Text and photo i.d. courtesy of Chuck Moore.
USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC. & New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 18 November 1922, Image 8, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
1920 - Pre Pearl Harbor Attack
BB-35 Texas513kTROPHY OF THE TEXAS (BB-35).
The efficiency flag proudly floats from the staff of the fighting top on the battleship Texas. The trophy is awarded to the ship with the highest honors for all around work and gives the vessel possessing it the right to fly the flag. One venturesome blue-Jacket of the super dreadnought's crew has climbed to the top of the staff to pose for the photographer.
Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE.
Photo & text by The North Platte semi-weekly Tribune. (North Platte, Neb.) 1895-1922, 31 January 1919, Image 6, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas93kFirst flight of airplane off an American battleship, by Lt. Connor McDonnell off Texas (BB-35) on 10 March 1919. USN photo & text courtesy of Chris Hoehn via Chuck Moore.
BB-35 Texas267kTexas (BB-35) at sea in 1919; many biplanes overhead provided by the Bunnell Photo Shop, San Diego, Ca. LOC photo # LC-USZ62-58097 / 3b05912r and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
New York Harbor1.78k"American dreadnoughts & super-dreadnoughts steaming into New York harbor 14 April 1919."
The Texas (BB-35) leads the procession with a airplane on her turret catapult. Note the escorting biplane.
The "escorting" aircraft is either a Curtiss HS-1 or HS-2 (note the single engine) can't tell which from the photo. The aircraft on a fly-off platform atop the No. 2 turret of the Texas is 1 of 6 Sopwith Camels purchased from Britain at the end of the war.
The platforms were a British concept designed to provide the fleet with an aircraft capable of reaching the high flying Zeppelins which the German Navy occasionally used as scouts. The Texas was the only US Battleship to be fitted with turret fly-off platforms while in Europe and was the test bed for this program in the US Navy. Not visible in this view is a stripped down (No fabric and no wings) Sopwith 1-1/2 Strutter lashed atop the No. 3 Turret. The platforms were eventually mounted on all 14" gun BB's through the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class (with mixed reviews from their commanders) and carried either a Hanriot HD-1 or a Neiuport 28. Though equipped inflatable floats for water landings, this tended to do a lot of damage not the least of which was dowsing a hot engine in cold salt water. By 1920 a successful compressed air catapult was developed and were being mounted on the aft deck of all 4 turreted battleships and fly-off platforms were removed. The Texas and New York (BB-34), because of their 5 Turrets, lacked the deck space for the catapult and had to make do with a float plane (Vought VE-7) sitting on the aft deck which would be launched by lowering it over the side for a surface take-off.
If you look carefully at the photo you see the VE-7 on the deck and the A-frame hoist used for handling it.
Photo by Paul Thompson.
Text courtesy of N.Y. Times, page 481, from The War of the Nations (New York), 31 December 1919, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
Atlantic  Fleet975kHow the Atlantic Fleet looked to the camera man in a seaplane flying over lower Manhattan a week ago yesterday morning as the mighty armada came up the bay to anchorage in the Hudson off Riverside Drive for a two weeks' vacation after months of strenuous maneuvers in Southern waters. The destroyers Dale (DD-290) and Flusser (DD-289) are shown leading the column of eight dreadnoughts: Oklahoma (BB-37), Nevada (BB-36), Arizona (BB-39), flagship Pennsylvania (BB-38), Utah (BB-31), Florida (BB-30), North Dakota (BB-29) and Delaware (BB-28) past the Statue of Liberty at a fifteen-knot clip. In addition to the big battleships, the fleet includes thirty-two destroyers, numerous supply ships and several submarines.
The Atlantic battleship fleet is home again. Here are the twelve great first line fighting ships that are paying Father Knickerbocker a two weeks' visit. Over a hundred of Uncle Sam's grim sea warriors gray the North River, while their 30,000 sailor-men are given the freedom of the city in a royal welcome home.
The Battleship Mississippi (BB-41) leading the fleet into the harbor, as photographed from an airplane. Note the airplanes atop the forward and aft turrets.
Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 20 April 1919, Image 48, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas260kHanriot HD-1 tied down on the fly-off platform on the No. 2 Turret of the Texas (BB-35), circa 1919.Photo courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-35 Texas31k Texas (BB-35) with a airplane on her turret catapult, circa early 1919. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas524k"Gobs" and Guns. A scene aboard the Texas (BB-35), just back from foreign waters, showing the "gobs" enjoying a little fun on the big guns. Photo by Underwood & Underwood, circa 1919. NARA FILE #: 165-WW-332D-43. Photo # HD-SN-99-02128 & text courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil, Defense Visual Information Center.
BB-35 Texas98k Off New York City, circa 1919.USNHC # NH 61243.
BB-35 Texas62kTexas (BB-35) off New York City, circa 1919. Note plane on platform over #2 turret. Another, disassembled, plane is on the #3 turret.Official USN photo USNHC # NH 60339, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-35 Texas 775k Texas (BB-35) & other battleships en-route to Guantanamo Bay for flight tests. Part of a flying-off platform can be seen atop #4 turret. The date is prior to August 1919 for Texas was operating in the Pacific from the 25 July Panama Canal crossing until November 1924. Text courtesy of Chuck Moore.
USN photo courtesy of Paul & Barbara Rebold.
BB-35 Texas65kCaptain Frank H. Schofield, USN, Commanding Officer, Texas (BB-35), at left, on board his ship, circa 1919, with his Executive Officer, Commander Ralph A. Koch, USN. Note the fire hose on the bulkhead between them. USNHC # NH NH 104942. Collection of Commander Haines H. Lippincott, USN (ChC).
BB-35 Texas3.90kGiant Dreadnoughts of the New Pacific Fleet through Panama Canal.
The Texas (BB-35) transiting through Gatun Locks on 25 July 1919.
Pictured also are the New Mexico (BB-40), New York (BB-34) & Arkansas (BB-33).
Photo by Times Wide World Service, & text courtesy of N.Y. Times, 17 August 1919, Page 2, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas663kPacific Fleet through Panama Canal.
The Texas (BB-35) transiting through Gatun Locks on 25 July 1919. Note aircraft on top of the #2 turret.
USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-34 New York118k A stationary Texas (BB-35) keeping her boilers burning as she stands anchored as a member of the Pacific Fleet, probably at San Diego, her home port, circa 1919.
When the Texas & New York were designed and constructed, the U.S. Navy still held to the notion that a commanding officer was better able to con his ship if he were in touch with the elements, thus most warships of this era were constructed with open air navigation bridges (the last vestiges of the era of sail). On the New York class this platform was situated behind and about 4 feet below the roof level of the conning tower. To afford some protection form the elements it is usually protected canvas wind breaks along the hand rails and an awning overhead. Both of the photos in question show this arrangement. Upon the U.S. entering WW I, the Royal Navy sent a team of officers "across the pond" to inspect the fleet we were sending over and offer suggestions that would better enable the American ships to operate along side the Royal Navy. Among the suggestions offered was the construction of enclosed pilot houses capable of withstanding the pounding of the heavy seas of the northern latitudes and afford protection from the cold winter temperatures and sea spray. Therefore in 1917 all battleships sent to the war zone were fitted with such a structure. On the New York and Texas the pilot house was attached to the forward cage mast at a level above the roof of the conning tower. Both of the photos show the original navigation bridge arrangement therefore they have to have been taken prior to 1917 and thus they can not have been taken on the west coast.
Of course the problem with sister ships is how to tell one from the other. In the case of the Texas and the New York during the pre-WW I time period (1914-1917), the best tell tale is the arrangement of the searchlights on the masts. The Texas carried her searchlights on individual platforms mounted one above the other about half way up the foremast and below the level of the funnels (and thus the smoke) on the main mast. The New York carried her searchlights side by side on a single platform about a third of the way up the foremast and below the funnel tops on the main mast. Given that the photographs in question are from this time frame we see that the photo that N. Moser labeled Texas is in fact the New York and the photograph labeled New York is in the Texas. During her refit in 1917, the Texas's searchlights were rearranged to the same as the New York's but photos from 1917 to 1920 can be distinguished by the clearly visible pilot house and the fly-off platforms atop the Nos. 2 and 4 turrets. The presence of 3" AA guns atop the Nos. 3 and 4 turrets will date photos in the 1921-1925 time frame.
USN Photo by N. Moser, from the collection of the Vallejo Naval and Historical Museum, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-35 Texas367kTexas (BB-35) in San Pedro circa 1919.Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Photo courtesy of Tommy Trampp.
BB-35 Texas724kThree bosses of the navy, Secretary Daniels, Mary Picklord and Admiral Hugh Rodman,commander of the new Pacific Fleet, from a photograph taken on the Texas (BB-35) in Los Angeles harbor, just after the ceremony at which Miss Pickford was made "little sister of the navy." the title won by the film star as sponsor of the Texas, which won the "Match the Navy" Victory Loan contest. Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from the New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 31 August 1919, Image 45, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas37k Hanriot HD-1 from the Texas (BB-35) on the beach. These markings appeared at a Fleet Review in November 1919 at Seattle WA in honor of a visit by President Wilson campaigning for approval of the League of Nations Treaty. USN photo courtesy of Chris Hoehn via Chuck Moore.
Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-35 Texas905kAll hands enjoying California sunshine, 1918-22.USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas686k We spent the Xmas holidays in San Francisco harbor, 1918-22. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-43 Tennessee 237k Foreground is definitely Tennessee (BB-43). In the middle is Idaho (BB-42) (darker camouflage note also the fantail catapult) and upper right is Arizona (BB-39), less certain but based on main mast platforms verses the New Mexico (BB-40). Middle background is New York (BB-34) (navigation bridge not over hanging conning tower). The far left background is the Texas (BB-35) (blunt bow, 2 funnels).
The aircraft is a Naval Aircraft Factory / Curtiss / Canadian Aeroplane Ltd F-5L.
The date of Mr. Kreisman's photo has to be 1920-1921. By 1922 all 14' and 16" gunned BB's (except New York and Texas as the 5th turret did not leave enough deck space) had been fitted with a compressed air catapult on the stern. The presence of a stern A/C catapult on only one of the three 1916 program BB's suggest this early in the introduction of this equipment but late enough for the turret top fly-off platforms to have been removed from all ships present. In 1919 the Battle Fleet shifted its base to San Pedro in California where it remained based until shifted to Pearl Harbor. The Texas and New York were assigned to that fleet until they returned east for modernization in 1925. This would suggest that the photo was taken some where in the Pacific. The rich flora onshore suggest a tropical climate and the enclosed by would lead me to guess Panama or Gitmo. If the 1920 or 1921 Fleet problem was conducted in Atlantic waters could explain an Atlantic based aircraft with a Pacific based Fleet.
Photo courtesy of Lance Kreisman via Fabio Pen~a.
Photo & text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn, Alan Moore & Richard Jensen.
Aircraft i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore via Larkins, William T. US Navy Aircraft 1921-1941/US Marine Corps Aircraft 1914-1959. [The image came from the USMC aircraft section, pg(9).] Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 1995. (originally published as US Marine Corps Aircraft 1914-1959, copyright 1959, and US Navy Aircraft 1921-1941, copyright 1961).
BB-35 Texas578kMan O War Row, Texas (BB-35), Arkansas (BB-33), Wyoming (BB-32) & New York (BB-34) at anchor, San Francisco harbor, Xmas 1920. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas74k 1920 photo of the Texas (BB-35) probably when she was reassigned to the Pacific Fleet.USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-35 Texas670kTexas (BB-35) underway with 6th Division, 16 April 1921.USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas 56k Texas (BB-35) watches Arkansas (BB-33) fire, 16 April 1921 with the Sixth Battleship Division out of San Pedro, CA. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
 Texas763kBow view of Texas (BB-35) underway in the Panama canal, circa 1919-21.Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Lieutenant Thomas Marshall Colston Photograph Album.
US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photos No. 1986.094.001.030.
BB-28 Delaware819kPanoramic photo of the U.S. fleet in Panama Bay (Pacific entrance to the Panama Canal) on 1 March 1923. 70 vessels are viewed; the Battle Fleet consists of all U.S. battleships from the Delaware (BB-28) through the Idaho (BB-42). Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, courtesy of Tom Kermen. Copyright R.G. Lewis, Y Photo Shop, Balboa, C.Z."
BB-34 New York52.57kThe United States fleet in Colon Harbor, Atlantic entrance to the Panama Canal, 21 January 1924. What appears to be the New York (BB-34) or the Texas (BB-35) is in the foreground. Library of Congress photo # 6a24199r, from the Prints and Photographs Division, courtesy of Tom Kermen. Copyright R.G. Lewis, Y Photo Shop, Balboa, C.Z."
BB-35 Texas29kA snowy Texas (BB-35). The snowy scene of the No. 4 Turret shows the long base range finder mounted on the back of the turret and the 3” AA battery on the wing platforms were not added until 1922. These photos are probably all taken during the summer 1924 midshipman’s cruise. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels. Text & i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-35 Texas24kPhoto caption "American ships braving the fury of the elements in the North Sea."USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas36kWater pours off the bows of the Texas (BB-35) as she makes her way across the North Sea.
Up we go.
USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas2.57kAnd through it.
Note the 5"/51 gun covered in canvas.
USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas20kAnd down we come. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas29k Texas (BB-35) with a airplane on her turret catapult, circa early 1920's. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas22kSighter takes aim and the crew prepare on a 5"/51 gun in warm and calm weather. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas27kCanvas bags hang from the barrels of her forward turrets as 2 sailors are framed between them.USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas38kLoading a 14" inch shell into the breech. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas118kBoxing match held on board during Battle Fleet maneuvers off Panama in 1923. View looks aft toward the rear of Turret # 4, which bears a banner reading "Texas (BB-35) ... Come On Texas ". Note Turret # 3 in the lower right, with a rangefinder and two 3"/50 anti-aircraft guns mounted on its top.USNHC # NH 55196, Photographed by Holtwick, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-47 Washington 93k A salvo from the battleship New York (BB-34) strikes the Washington (BB-47) on her starboard side while the ship was used as a target off Virginia Capes, Virginia, 26 November 1924. The battleship Texas (BB-35) is in the background. USN photo courtesy of maritimequest.com.
BB-35 Texas854kThe Texas (BB-35) in drydock about to begin modernization at Norfolk Navy Yard, 1925.
Note the empty dock to her left; it would soon be occupied by her sister, New York (BB-34).
Photo i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoen.
USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-35 Texas65k Texas (BB-35) in drydock at Norfolk Navy Yard in 1925 as she began modernization. The ship on the right is the New York (BB-34), also undergoing modernization. USN photo contributed by Mike Green, courtesy of Leeward Publications.
BB-35 Texas150k Texas (BB-35) in drydock for modernization at Norfolk Navy Yard, 17 February 1926. USN photo courtesy of Paul & Barbara Rebold.
BB-35 Texas 188k Texas (BB-35) leaving drydock, 13 September 1926. USN photo courtesy of Paul & Barbara Rebold.
BB-35 Texas409kTexas (BB-35) broadside without the bang; off Norfolk N.Y., in November 1926.US National Archives photo # 19-lc-22a 4, from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-35 Texas288kTexas (BB-35) off Norfolk N.Y., in November 1926.US National Archives photo # 19-lc-22a 6, from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-35 Texas239kBig size bow on view for a big size state.US National Archives photo # 19-lc-22a 10628, from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-35 Texas452kFinished product for the end of the year: December 1926. US National Archives photo # 19-lc-22 a 1, from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-35 Texas437kTexas (BB-35) was designated as USN flagship in September 1927. The PDF that appears here of the Flag Bridge was installed prior to the designation but after she left Norfolk dry dock, on 23 November 1926. The image is visible in the January 1928 entry into Havana Harbor.
Note the admiral's flag flying from the foremast, searchlights grouped on the main mast and three Chance-Voight O3U Corsairs mounted on the powder-type MK4 catapult atop #3turret.
The attached letters detail the origin of the alteration and record the approval. The 3 drawings included (007-009) are the sketches prepared by the ship and sent to Washington for review.
The work took place at Norfolk NY in an availability that took from 6 June 1927 to 22 August 1927. The ship's last previous availability took place during 23 November to 4 December 1926. The ship's home yard was changed from Norfolk to New York effective 22 August 1927. There was a fire on board on about 29 August that put the ship back in yard hands--at New York--a few days later. The fire took place in cable insulation and was initially estimated to need about 50 man-days of repair work.
Currently, though the flag bridge level is accessible to the public the flag plot is not open and the ports are plated over. An interesting and slightly related aside is that the navigation bridge below actual incorporate the original pilot house that was first added to the ship in 1917. In the overhead of the Captain's emergency cabin and the bridge radio space you can see where the plating ended in the curve of the old cage mast. The Navy Yard simply attached it to the new tripod mast and grafted on the after spaces.
USN photo courtesy Pieter Bakels.
PDF insert photos & text courtesy of Chris Wright via Chuck Haberlein.
Partial text courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-35 Texas407kStarboard side view of the Texas (BB-35) probably taken around the same time as the above photo.USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-35 Texas502kThe square ports were installed in the wardroom for the President Coolidge's trip to Havana for the Pan American Comference in 1928.Text & photo i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
Photo possibly by Frank Lynch, chief photographer of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, circa 1929.
Photo from the collection of Carrie Schmidt.
BB-35 Texas98kTexas (BB-35) entering Havana Harbor Cuba, 15 January 1928, carrying President Collidge on board. Photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-35 Texas309kThe battleship Texas (BB-35) cruising up the Hudson past the Corn Products Refining Company (Linit Sign) in Edgewater NJ. in the late 20's to very early 30's. Photo courtesy of David Perrett.
Photo i.d. & text courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-35 Texas84kIn January 1928, Texas (BB-35) transported President Coolidge to Havana for the Pan-American conference and then continued on via the Panama Canal and the west coast to maneuvers with the fleet near Hawaii. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-35 Texas570kThe battleship Texas (BB-35) entering Havana Harbor from Malecon ca. 1928.Photo courtesy of Library of Congress, # LC-USZC4-14219 (Cropped) via Mike Green.
BB-35 Texas118kFiring her 14"/45 main battery guns, during long range battle practice, February 1928. firing her 14"/45 main battery guns, during long range battle practice, February 1928.USNHC # NH 2792, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-35 Texas148kBow on view of Texas (BB-35) firing her 14"/45 main battery guns, during long range battle practice, February 1928.From the Collection of Rear Admiral Ret. Jack Bowling, submitted by his grandson, Breck Perkins.
BB-35 Texas30k A Loening OL-6 on one of the catapults of the battleship Texas (BB-35) on June 1928.USN Photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
Battlefleet122kWatercolor of a Presidential review during President Hoover's term of office, 1928-32.
Crews line the rails of a Colorado class (BB-45 / 48) battleship as the ships pass in line astern of the reviewing stand with the airship Los Angeles (ZR-3) piercing the clouds accompanied by 9 biplanes.
Courtesy of Michael Schwarz.
Battlefleet56kView of the U.S. Battlefleet from above, possibly from the airship Los Angeles (ZR-3). Photo courtesy of periscopefilm.com.
BB-35 Texas130k"Best of luck to his boys". Admiral Henry A. Wiley, retiring at his own request after 47 years of service, falters in his farewell as he speaks a valedictory to his fellow officers and crew assembled on quarterdeck of the Texas (BB-35) off L. A. Harbor on 21 May 1929. He stands in the front of the line.Associated Press text & photo courtesy of San Francisco Examiner via David S. Smith.
BB-35 Texas1.20kOil on canvas painting by the artist Tom Freeman entitled "A Texan in New York".
The photo of the Texas (BB-35) on which the painting was inspired is shown here in the New York Navy Yard, 4 November 1930.
Photo and text courtesy of oldgloryprints.com
Inset photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-42 Idaho93kIdaho (BB-42) (foreground) and Texas (BB-35) steaming at the rear of the battle line, during Battle Fleet practice off the California coast, circa 1930. Idaho's four triple 14"/50 gun turrets are trained on the starboard beam.USNHC # NH 73834, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-35 Texas300kThe battleship Texas (BB-35) pictured underway during the 1930s.Photo courtesy of the National Naval Aviation Museum via Bill Gonyo.
BB-35 Texas77kSecretary of the Navy Charles Francis Adams (left),and Captain Harold R. Stark, USN, Aide to the Secretary of the Navy, on the signal bridge of Texas (BB-35), March 1931. Note leg of the ship's tripod foremast behind them. USNHC # NH 75776, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-35 Texas105kSecretary of the Navy Charles Francis Adams inspects the crew of Texas (BB-35), March 1931.USNHC # NH 75775, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-35 Texas19kCommemorative post mark on the occasion of the visit of the Texas (BB-35) to the Virgin Islands, 22 September 1934. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
BB-35 Texas55kCommemorative post mark on the occasion of Thanksgiving day 1934 on the Texas (BB-35). Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
BB-35 Texas 361k Pre WW II aerial photo of the Texas (BB-35). Date is prior to April 1935, for it was during April through August at Bremerton Navy Yard that the birdbath platforms were installed atop both masts.
As to a more specific date; I am perplexed by the absence of 50cal AA guns on the aft platforms of the Flag Bridge, refered to at this time as the AA Gun Platform. I do not know when the guns were installed. Renown 1920s-1930 model builder Armitage McCann has them on his 1931 Texas model. Maybe the photo predates the 50cal guns being aboard?
USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Text courtesy of Chuck Moore.
BB-35 Texas1.30kA Texas (BB-35) sized broadside photo circa 1937-38. The O3U planes were replaced by SOC in early 1939 and the 0.50 cal MG tubs atop both the masts were added in 1937 (maybe 1936). The E does not stand for enormous.Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
Photo courtesy of the late Robert Wilmes, submitted by his son, Dan Wilmes.
BB-35 Texas38k14" guns roar on the Texas (BB-35). Visible in the photo are post-modernization additions: air-castle for the moved 5” battery, tripod mast, aircraft catapult and after fire control tower. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels. Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-35 Texas90kThe Texas (BB-35) entering Puget Sound Naval Shipyard for a period in drydock, possibly circa 1937. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
John Hood1.97kTexas (BB-35) at Pearl Harbor, probably summer 1937. Photo courtesy of Roger Reynolds.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Photo added 07/16/15.
BB-35 Texas111k Texas (BB-35) as seen on 21 June 1937 in the Panama Canal Gatun Locks. The "bird bath" on top of her fire controls contains 0.50 caliber machine guns. The standard 20 foot range finder is prominent atop her bridge.USN photo.
BB-39 Arizona703kArizona (BB-39) in 1930's, maneuvering at sea astern of Tennessee (BB-43) and Texas (BB-35)(in lead). USN photo courtesy Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas101kOil on canvas painting by the artist James Flood entitled "Texas (BB-35) - 1938". The Texas is shown gracing New York Harbor with her presence.Photo and partial text courtesy of oldgloryprints.com
BB-34 New York312kNorfolk VA., 13 April 1939. "Texas (BB-35) is bounded by New York (BB-34)".
At least the battleships of those names are neighbors, as they stand tied up at Hampton Roads here during yesterday's preliminary off the Virginia capes. Janes Fighting Ships authority on the world's fighting battlecraft, describes the Texas & New York as slow, hard to handle and bad sea boats in rough weather.
A.P. Wire photo from the collection of Michael Strout, courtesy of Jonathan Eno.
BB-35 Texas445kNorfolk VA., 13 April 1939. "Steel forest for Americas shores".
Menacing, gun laden tripod masts of the battleships Texas (BB-35) & New York (BB-34), both completed in 1914, are shown here as fleet began to arrive here yesterday for naval maneuvers off Virginia capes, preparatory to grand parade to N.Y. late this month. Both ships have 10 14" guns, 16 5" guns, and each can carry 3 aircraft.
A.P. Wire photo from the collection of Michael Strout, courtesy of Jonathan Eno.
BB-35 Texas285kN.Y. 22 April 1939. "Inward Bound".
Most moving warships on the Atlantic coast have been outward bound, under orders returning the U.S. fleet to the Pacific, but here's the battleship Texas (BB-35), one of the vessels scheduled to be on hand when the World's Fair opens, seen as she passed under the Brooklyn Bridge todat on her way to a berth at the Navy Yard. In the background is the Brooklyn skyline.
A.P. Wire photo from the collection of Michael Strout, courtesy of Jonathan Eno.
BB-35 Texas177kN.Y. 29 April 1939. "Fleet steams up Hudson".
Thirty seven vessels of the Atlantic Squadron steamed through N.Y. harbor and up the Hudson River today as part of the ceremonies connected with tomorrow's opening of the World Fair. This striking picture made from the deck of the New York (BB-34) flagship, shows the Texas (BB-35) followed by the Tennessee (BB-43).
A.P. Wire photo from the collection of Michael Strout, courtesy of Jonathan Eno.
BB-35 Texas221kN.Y. 3 May 1939. "The Navy's eyes probe the sky".
Two battleships [looks to be the Texas (BB-35) & New York (BB-34)] of the Navy's Atlantic squadron made this pretty picture on the Hudson when their huge searchlights were played across the sky in search of imaginary aerial attackers. The lights of New York's myriad skyscrappers twinkle through from the background.
A.P. Wire photo from the collection of Michael Strout, courtesy of Jonathan Eno.
BB-33 Arkansas 178k Arkansas (BB-33) & Texas (BB-35) sail in tandem. Arkansas departed Norfolk on 11 January 1940, in company with Texas and New York, and proceeded thence to Guantanamo Bay for fleet exercises.
The easiest feature for distinguishing the Texas from the New York is the size of the navigation bridge which is located in the foremast one platform level above the roof of the conning tower. The bridge of the New York is short and extends only to the aft edge of the conning tower. The Texas' bridge extends to the forward edge of the conning tower with a single stanchion supporting its forward edge. These enclosed navigation bridges were added in 1917 at the "suggestion" of the Royal Navy who expressed the opinion that the open deck bridges found on American warships would be ill-suited for sailing in the North Sea or North Atlantic - they were right.
USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
Photo i.d. & text courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-35 Texas79kHistory indicates a continuous use of the title "Commander in Chief, Atlantic Fleet" from 1906 until 1923 and again from 1941 to 2002. In a reorganization of the United States Fleet in 1923, that title was abolished and the title Commander Scouting Force was used. On 1 February 1941, General Order 143 reestablished the title and reorganized the United States Fleet into three separate fleets (Atlantic, Pacific and Asiatic). The Order further stated each fleet would be under the command of a full admiral. Thus, on 1 February 1941, Rear Admiral Ernest J. King, in his flagship Texas (BB-35) at Culebra, Puerto Rico, hauled down his two-star flag and hoisted his four-star flag as Commander in Chief, United States Atlantic Fleet. USNHC photo # 80-G-416885 via Bill Gonyo.
BB-35 Texas88kCapt. Clarence Nelson Hinkamp was the Commanding Officer of the battleship Texas (BB-35) from 31 May 1940 to 2 August 1941. Photo from the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
BB-35 Texas490kPhoto taken 8 June 1940, as Texas (BB-35) takes on midshipmen from the U.S. Naval Acadamy for their summer cruise. This may have been the last pre-war midshipman cruise due to World War II.
Note that she still has the range clock, her open casemates, and what looks like an admiral's flag flying from the mainmast.
International News Photo & text courtesy of David Buell.
BB-35 Texas559kTexas (BB-35) on Navy Day, 27 October 1940.Source: United States National Archives, Photo No. 80-G-464121 via Mike Green.
BB-35 Texas63kSilhouetted against the sunset, while participating in North Atlantic convoy operations, circa summer 1941. Photographed by Lieutenant Dayton A. Seiler, USN.Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-K-387, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-35 Texas104kChaumont (AP-5) at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Va., on 4 October 1941. Texas (BB-35) is in the background to the right with Dickerson (DD-157) and another four-piper. The British aircraft carrier in the foreground is probably HMS Illustrious under repair under "Aid Short of War." Photograph USNHC # 19-N-25845, from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.
BB-35 Texas45kTexas (BB-35) takes water over the bow in this 1941 photo.Photo by LCDR Charles W. Moses, Gunnery Officer Texas from 2 January 1941 until 18 February 1943.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Jim Moses, CDR, USN (Ret). He was always behind the camera. All I have (that I know of - I still find stuff in my mother's things) from his Texas days is this one of his desk (that's her) taken by a LIFE photographer. The tall building in the picture is in his hometown, Bismarck, ND.
USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas45kInspection time on the fantail of the Texas (BB-35) sometime in 1941.Photo by LCDR Charles W. Moses, Gunnery Officer Texas from 2 January 1941 until 18 February 1943.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Jim Moses, CDR, USN (Ret)
USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
WW II
BB-35 Texas400kTexas (BB-35) anchored at Hvalfjord, Iceland in February, 1942. Source: "The media for this item are free to reuse for non-commercial purposes under the IWM Non Commercial Licence. Video, sound and images can be embedded with the code we offer here, and images can also be downloaded. By downloading any images or embedding any media, you agree to the terms and conditions of the IWM Non Commercial Licence, including your use of the attribution statement specified by IWM.
"Imperial War Museum Admiralty Official Collection by Ware C.J. (Lt), Photo No. IWM (A 8058) © courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-34 New York163kSupplies being loaded onto Texas (BB-35).Photographer: Frank Scherschel, courtesy of life.time.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Travis Davis, Curatorial Assistant for Collections and Restoration, Battleship TEXAS State Historic Site.
BB-34 New York168kMess cook cutting cake in bakery shop aboard Texas (BB-35).
The baker picture is not actually in the Bakery, but outside in the port Aircastle. Because of the size constraints of the Bakery, the bakers set the cooling racks in the Aircastle to cool bread or in this case corn bread. Quite a few of our veterans tell us about seeing guys wearing pea coats in the summer and swiping some bread.
Photographer: Frank Scherschel, courtesy of life.time.
Photo i.d. & text courtesy of Travis Davis, Curatorial Assistant for Collections and Restoration, Battleship TEXAS State Historic Site.
BB-34 New York223kOverhead view of US sailors manning the signal bridge of Texas (BB-35).
Note the sailors below sparring in an improvised ring.
On the Signal Bridge you can actually see Texas written on the life ring that is hanging on the splinter screen in the upper left hand corner of the picture.
Photographer: Frank Scherschel, courtesy of life.time.
Photo i.d. & text courtesy of Travis Davis, Curatorial Assistant for Collections and Restoration, Battleship TEXAS State Historic Site.
BB-34 New York155kSearchlight shining through fog from tower of Texas (BB-35) in 1942.
The Main Mast is definitely that of Texas due to the configuration of the Search Light Platform in relation to the Movie Operating Platform (or so the 1942 Booklet of General Plans for New York (BB-34) calls it). In New York there is not a space between the Search Light Platform and the Movie Operating Platform like there was on Texas.
Photographer: Frank Scherschel, courtesy of life.time.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Travis Davis, Curatorial Assistant for Collections and Restoration, Battleship TEXAS State Historic Site.
BB-35 Texas42kColored b&w of Texas (BB-35). The original b&w is U.S. Navy & printed in the book 'Fighting Fleets' by R.S. Critchell, and H.H. Rimington. Copyright 1942 by Dodd, Mead, & Co, Inc. Courtesy of Eric W. Dahlstrom.
BB-35 Texas83kBow on view of Texas (BB-35) at the Norfolk Naval Yard, Portsmouth Virginia, 19 August 1942.USN photo.
BB-35 Texas80kStarboard bow view of the Texas (BB-35) at the Norfolk Naval Yard, Portsmouth Virginia, 19 August 1942.USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-35 Texas83kUnderway, 15 March 1943, all turrets are trained sharply to port. USN photo.
BB-35 Texas117kUnderway off Norfolk, Virginia, 15 March 1943, with her main battery gun turrets trained to port.Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-63542, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-35 Texas202kStern view of the Texas (BB-35), 15 March 1943. USN photo serial # 4841-43, courtesy of Ed Zajkowski.
BB-35 Texas235kStarboard quarter view, 15 March 1943.USN photo serial # 4840-43, courtesy of Ed Zajkowski.
BB-35 Texas110kHead on view, 15 March 1943.USN photo serial # 4837-43 courtesy of Ed Zajkowski.
BB-35 Texas85kFinal wartime appearance of the Texas (BB-35) as seen is after the summer of 1943 and before January 1944. The foremast SG antenna is not yet atop the foremast. The top of the foremast is lacking in antenna detail but the elevated SG platform is not present. Plane, deck and lightweight A.A. arrangement are easily seen in this photo.Text contributed by Chuck Moore. USN photo.
BB-35 Texas120kUnderway near Casco Bay, Maine, prior to 25 January 1944. On 25 January 1944, Texas (BB-35) entered Boston Navy Yard, where among other changes, the SC-1 radar antenna atop the foremast was removed and the SG antenna which is below the 3-tier fire control structure, was relocated atop the foremast. The date is after June 1943 for this is when the quad 40mm guns (among other guns) were installed, in Boston Navy Yard (1 - 30 June 1943).Text contributed by Chuck Moore. USN photo.
BB-35 Texas55k Texas (BB-35) at anchor in the Clyde River, Scotland after escorting a troop convoy to the British Isles. A British escort carrier is in the background. The date is after 1943. Texas was in the Clyde in July 1942, January 1944 and April 1944. With the foremast SG being atop the fire control structure, the image is after February 1944, for it was in a Boston Navy Yard period of January - February 1944 that the SG antenna was relocated atop the foremast. Text contributed by Chuck Moore. USN photo contributed by Mike Green, courtesy of Leeward Publications.
BB-35 Texas38kTexas (BB-35) with OS2U on after catapult. Date should be late April 1944. Note that the forward and after portions of the A/C catapult have been dismounted from the #3 Turret. (The forward portions is the structure sitting on the port quarter deck.) These and the Kingfishers were landed in Belfast prior to Normandy invasion. Spotter pilots from the BB's and CA's flew Mustangs and Spitfires over the beach head.The dismounted catapult and A/C on the deck would make the probable location in the Irish Sea on the trip from the Clyde to Belfast. The Texas appears fueling an accompanying escort (fuel line hanging from boat crane in lower left) Courtesy of Joe F. Powers. Photo i.d. & text courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-36 Nevada79kIn Belfast Lough, Northern Ireland, 14 May 1944. Texas (BB-35) is at right. Photographed from Quincy (CA-71).Official USN photo # 80-G-367897, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-35 Texas98kGen. Dwight D. Eisenhower addresses the crew of the Texas (BB-35) prior to the Normandy landing. Texas supported the Omaha Beach landings. Photo courtesy of USN/USNI.
BB-35 Texas91kNavy corpsmen treat wounded U.S. Army Rangers aboard the Texas (BB-35). Photo courtesy of USN/USNI.
BB-35 Texas55k Oil on canvas painting by the artist Randall Wilson entitled "Gunline Omaha".
In support of the American landings at Utah and Omaha beaches, the Texas (BB-35) slugs it out with German heavy gun emplacements during the D-Day landings.
Text and drawing courtesy of naval-art.com
BB-35 Texas81kA heavy German coast artillery shell falls between Texas (BB-35), in the background, and Arkansas (BB-33), while the two battleships were engaging Battery Hamburg during the bombardment of Cherbourg, France, 25 June 1944. Photographed from Arkansas.USNHC # 80-G-244210, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-35 Texas45kSky watch on board the Texas (BB-35).USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas2.57kCrewmembers of a 5/51" pause for conversation during gunnery practice.Photo i.d. courtesy of Ron Balko.
USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas152kHere's looking at you from the Texas (BB-35) bridge, 1944.Photo # 80G-352839 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-35 Texas155kTall, dark & underside of the Texas (BB-35) bridge, 1944.Photo # 80G-352838 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-35 Texas732kSlow moment on Texas (BB-35), 7 June 1944.Photo # 80G-235585 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-35 Texas921kWounded in France, U.S. Army Rangers are carefully hoisted aboard the battleship Texas (BB-35) after a speedy trip out from the embattled shoreline in landing craft. The casualties were quickly given medical treatment on the giant ship. USN photo courtesy of flickr.com via Robert Hurst.
BB-35 Texas36kTexas (BB-35) wearing the results of German gunnery during close-in fire support off Cherbourg, 26 June, 1944. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas41kShell splash from what might be a 240-millimeter armor-piercing shell lands near the Texas (BB-35) from German gunnery during close-in fire support off Cherbourg, 26 June, 1944. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas41kThe battleship Texas (BB-35) fires her main batteries in this painting by the artist Carl G.Evers. USN photo courtesy Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas240kTwo views of Texas (BB-35) broadside, 1944.Photo # 80G-229725 (inset) / 419699 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-34 New York124kDrawing prepared by the Bureau of Ships for Camouflage Measure 31a, Design 8B intended for the battleships New York (BB-34) and Texas (BB-35). This plan, approved by Captain Torvald A. Solberg, USN, is dated 11 October 1944. It shows the ship's starboard side, exposed decks and superstructure ends. New York wore this pattern in late 1944 and early 1945. Texas was painted in it for a brief period during the final part of 1944. Official USN photo # 19-N-73641, from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.
BB-34 New York117kDrawing prepared by the Bureau of Ships for Camouflage Measure 31a, Design 8B intended for the battleships New York (BB-34) and Texas (BB-35). This plan, approved by Captain Torvald A. Solberg, USN, is dated 11 October 1944. It shows the ship's port side, exposed decks and superstructure ends. New York wore this pattern in late 1944 and early 1945. Texas was painted in it for a brief period during the final part of 1944. Official USN photo # 19-N-73640, from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.
BB-35 Texas60kRear Admiral Carleton F. Bryant, USN (left)and Captain Charles A. Baker, USN, Commanding Officer, Texas (BB-35). On board Texas with a German 240mm (9.4") dud shell that hit the ship during the bombardment of Battery "Hamburg", east of Cherbourg, France, on 25 June 1944. Photographed while Texas was undergoing overhaul at the New York Navy Yard on 12 October 1944.Official USN photo 80-G-46961, now in the collections of the National Archives courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
BB-35 Texas1.10kThe battleship Texas (BB-35) all dressed up in Camouflage Measure 31a, Design 8B in this painting by the artist Carl G.Evers. USN photo courtesy Pieter Bakels.
BB-35 Texas831kTexas (BB-35) underway off the Maine coast (43-40N; 70-03W), 1 November 1944. She is painted in Camouflage Measure 31a, Design 8B. USN photo # 80-G-289714, from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-35 Texas49kFebruary 1945 at Iwo Jima, an OS2U Kingfisher returns home while another OS2U is mounted on the turret catapult.USN photo.
BB-35 Texas99kOil on canvas print by the artist Tom Freeman entitled "The Pacific Lone Star".
This painting depicts the Texas (BB-35) bombarding Iwo Jima, 19 February 1945.
Photo and text courtesy of oldgloryprints.com
BB-35 Texas 85k Texas (BB-35) underway off Iwo Jima during the landings there in February 1945. LSM-266 is in the right background. Photographed from Nevada (BB-36). U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 80-G-303866. Official USN photo now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-35 Texas77kAn OS2U Kingfisher scout plane is seen before launch atop the middle turret while at Iwo Jima, February 1945.USN photo.
BB-35 Texas 72k Texas (BB-35) recovers a Vought OS2U "Kingfisher" floatplane in a light rain at 1700 Hrs. on 16 February 1945, the first day of the Iwo Jima pre-invasion bombardment. The OS2U's radioman is riding the wing after hooking the plane to the recovery crane. Note details of the crane, aircraft recovery mat and net, 40mm quad gun mounting and the plane's color scheme and markings. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # 80-G-309140. Official USN photo now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-35 Texas368kEven Texas (BB-35) needs to drink oil. The following two photos show the view from up above as seen from Ltjg Lloyd LaVack's camera. He was an Engineer Officer on Taluga (AO-62).
In this view the battleship's crew is hauling the refueling hoses on board Texas on 15 April 1945.
View amidships from the Main Mast.
LaVack picture courtesy of Tommy Trampp.
BB-35 Texas135kJapanese Kamikaze pilot (L, between 2 black puffs, just above waterline) flying through hail of machine gun & antiaircraft fire from the battleship Texas (BB-35), which succeeded in downing the plane.Photographer: possibly Frank Scherschel, courtesy of life.time.
BB-35 Texas83kA quad 40mm Bofors crew, note the life raft stowage. Circa 1945.USN photo.
BB-35 Texas734kOutside looking in. (depending on your perspective)
Texas (BB-35) possibly on her way home from the war.
USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Post War - Present
BB-35 Texas521k The Texas (BB-35) steams into the port of Los Angeles, California, sometime in mid October 1945. Over 5 ships brought 9,000 soldiers back from the Pacific. Photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-35 Texas322k Texas (BB-35) in Norfolk taken between February 1946 and April 1946. Photo courtesy of the late Robert Wilmes, submitted by his son, Dan Wilmes.
BB-35 Texas 470k Decomm Program Front Page of the Texas (BB-35) on 21 April 1948. Photo courtesy of Ron Reeves via ebay.com.
BB-35 Texas89kThe battleship Texas (BB-35) is shown leaving Norfolk Naval Shipyard in March 1948 to begin its journey to the state of Texas, where it was presented as a memorial. The old Norfolk skyline and the Norfolk-Portsmouth ferry are also visible in the background. USN photo from nnsy1.navy.mil contributed by Mike Green.
BB-35 Texas429kTexas (BB-35) is being towed down the Elizabeth River from the Norfolk Naval Shipyard. Its destination is the San Jacinto Battleground State Historic Site at LaPorte, Texas for its final resting space as a ship museum and memorial. The photograph was taken at the foot of North Street in Portsmouth, Virginia. (Date: 3/18/1948). Photo courtesy of the Norfolk Public Library via Bill Gonyo.
BB-35 Texas48k1951 postcard photo of the Texas (BB-35). Photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-35 Texas66k1950's photo of the Texas (BB-35). Photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-35 Texas163kBow on view of Texas (BB-35) at her home in La Porte, Texas. 1968.Ronald Barker, Capt USAF (Ret)
BB-35 Texas175kPortside view of the Texas (BB-35) as she appeared in 1970 at San Jacinto. Photo by Atlanta News Agency, Inc, courtesy of David Buell.
BB-35 Texas166kTexas (BB-35) as she appeared in 1970 at San Jacinto.Photo by W.M. Cline Co., Cline Photo, Inc, courtesy of David Buell.
BB-35 Texas597kA view of the San Jacinto Battlefield Memorial 1 January 1980 from the memorial battleship Texas (BB-35) . The ship's forward 14-inch/45-caliber guns are in the foreground. USN photo # DN-SC-86-04738 by PH1 Dave MacLean from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection, courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil.& submitted by Robert M. Cieri.
BB-35 Texas113kA view of the aft 14-inch/45-caliber guns aboard the memorial battleship Texas (BB-35) on 1 January 1980. USN photo # DN-SC-86-04745 by PH1 Dave MacLean, from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection, courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil.
BB-35 Texas162kBow view of the Texas (BB-35) in dry dock at Todd Galveston in 1989. The Texas had been moved from the San Jacinto battleground to Todd for much need repair and up keep. Photo i.d. courtesy of Alan H. Marks. USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-35 Texas20kCommemorative post mark on the occasion of the 50th anniversary on the attack of Pearl Harbor issued for the Texas (BB-35) at her home in La Porte Texas, 7 December 1991.Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
BB-35 Texas53kThe next 9 photos were submitted by Richard Leonhardt, Capt Navy (Ret) at her home in La Porte, Texas. May 2002. The Galley of the Texas (BB-35) . Richard Leonhardt, Capt Navy (Ret).
BB-35 Texas50kGun deck.Richard Leonhardt, Capt Navy (Ret).
BB-35 Texas64kBakery.Richard Leonhardt, Capt Navy (Ret).
BB-35 Texas46kDental clinic.Richard Leonhardt, Capt Navy (Ret).
BB-35 Texas76kCIC.Richard Leonhardt, Capt Navy (Ret).
BB-35 Texas71kMedical administration office.Richard Leonhardt, Capt Navy (Ret).
BB-35 Texas51kMain passageway.Richard Leonhardt, Capt Navy (Ret).
BB-35 Texas63kLaundry.Richard Leonhardt, Capt Navy (Ret).
BB-35 Texas62kBarber shop.Richard Leonhardt, Capt Navy (Ret).
(NISMF)376kA guest studies a painting depicting the history of battleships. The artwork was painted by George Skybeck and presented to the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association during their annual banquet at Honolulu, Hawaii, on 8 December 1991. USN photo # DN-SC-92-05391, by PHC Carolyn Harris, from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection, courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil.
World War II Memorial371kA quote made by Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz is inscribed on a granite wall at the National World War II Memorial located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Fleet Adm. Nimitz was the United States signatory to the surrender terms aboard the battleship Missouri (BB-63) in Tokyo Bay, Japan on 2 September 1945, thus ending World War II. Established by the American Battle Monuments Commission, the memorial honors all military veterans of World War II, the citizens on the home front, the nation at large, and the high moral purpose and idealism that motivated the nation's call to arms. On 29 May 2004, the memorial was formally dedicated with an estimated 200,000 people expected to attend, and includes 100,000 visiting veterans of all wars.USN photo # N-0295M-011 by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Daniel J. McLain, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
BB-35 Texas48kCommemorative postal cover on the occasion of Texas (BB-35) 90th anniversary, 15 April 2004.Photo courtesy of Jack Treutle.
BB-35 Texas85kPDF of a Personal History of the Texas (BB-35) .Photo courtesy of Albert Lee Candido via Mike Sharp & submitted by Robert Hall.
BB-35 Texas194kTexas (BB-35), 2007. Photo courtesy of Byron Flynt.
BB-35 Texas194kLone star of Texas rises above the San Jacinto Battlefield.Photo courtesy of Byron Flynt.
BB-35 Texas154kWonderful image taken as the sun is setting. It brings out details and alters her appearance. Photo courtesy of Byron Flynt.
BB-35 Texas135kNight time in Texas. Photo courtesy of Byron Flynt.
BB-35 Texas332kMain guns have not been fired in anger for over 60 years.Photo courtesy of Roel Bakels.
BB-35 Texas269k40mm tub.Photo courtesy of Roel Bakels.
BB-35 Texas260kLone Star hotel accommodations.Photo courtesy of Roel Bakels.
BB-35 Texas255kThe San Jacinto Battlefield monument appears to be incorporated into the Texas (BB-35) mast.Photo courtesy of Roel Bakels.
BB-35 Texas212kThe museum battleship Texas (BB-35) is being restored to her 1945 condition. Compartments of this museum ship have been featured in several Hollywood movies including "Pearl Harbor" and "Flags of Our Fathers." (USN photo # N-8390S-068 by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Kimberly R. Stephens courtesy of navy.mil.
BB-35 Texas762kThe Dutch chemical tanker Jo Cedar; in the far background the battleship Texas (BB-35), seemingly representing a by-gone age.Photo courtesy of Roel Bakels.
BB-35 Texas 18.8k A brief 160 photo essay on the history of the Texas (BB-35).
Graphic heavy link, may take one or two light years to download depending on the speed of your computer.
PDF courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-35 Texas154kChildren shimmy up the barrels of massive cannons on the upper decks of the 100-year-old Battleship Texas (BB-35), focused on firing at an imaginary enemy and oblivious to the tension in the historic vessel's belly where a crew works on pumping out dozens of gallons of oil-laced water.
The battleship where the young tourists roam became flooded over the weekend. Staff arrived Saturday and immediately noticed something was wrong with the ship that fought in World Wars I and II and has served since 1948 as a memorial and museum to those who sacrificed their lives.
The vessel was sitting awkwardly in its slip. She was lower in the water and listing to the left.
"We got down to the lower portions of the ship and discovered that we had taken on more water than usual in areas that we normally don't," ship manager Andy Smith said. "They started pumping throughout the day Saturday, and it got progressively worse."
The situation was so dire by Sunday that the ship's caretaker, the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, had to find more pumps to help remove the water. Smith said the news got worse on Monday.
Water had entered areas that housed old oil tanks used when the ship was still in active duty and serving in every theater in World War II. The Navy had emptied out the oil before handing the vessel over to Texas, but hadn't cleaned out the tanks. Smith realized he had an environmental issue on his hands.
He hired a company to skim the oil off the top of the water and set up boom in case any of it landed in Buffalo Bayou and the Houston Ship Channel. Meanwhile, Smith's pumps are working nonstop to remove the water from the bottom, and at least ensure no more liquids get on the vessel.
"It seems like every time we turn around there's more oil because obviously it's very residual but it spreads really nice, especially in this nice Texas heat," Smith said.
Until the oil is removed, workers can't get out all the water and look for the source of the problem, which could be several things. It is possible, he said, that the oil will be completely removed by late Wednesday. Then, it should only take a few hours to remove the water, though Smith said he is preparing for the possibility that more water will flow in for a short time after the oil is completely removed due to a change in pressure.
Still, he hopes to at least know the source of the problem by Thursday so the crew can begin designing a repair plan.
World War II veteran William R. Bradshaw, 87, hopes to be part of the repair effort. On Wednesday, he sat in a shady area of the vessel as rowdy children ran up the ramp. He was waiting to discuss with Smith whether the epoxy his plastics company produces can seal the holes, as it did in 1985 when the battleship had a five-month leak that befuddled the crew.
"I've always thought that I would develop a product that would be dedicated to the Navy," Bradshaw said, proud that his company, Bradco Plastics, Inc., has had a part in ensuring future generations can visit the historic ship. "It's kind of like coming home again because when you spend over two years on one at sea, you get all the cruise experience you really want. So it's something that it's nice to come back to."
Smith simply wants to get to the point where he can repair the problem and move ahead with a long-term, multimillion-dollar plan to build a dry berth for the battleship.
"It's a mammoth effort to keep her preserved. She is an artifact. She is a museum, too," Smith said, noting that normally artifacts are preserved in a climate-controlled environment, "on velvet, under glass."
"She can't be that way. We actually let people play on the artifact, run around on her, and the artifact interacts with the environment in a lot of negative ways," Smith said. "So we rust, constantly rust. There's deterioration, the sun beating down, hot, cold, all of that has an effect, long-term effect, on the ship."
By Ramit Plushnick-Masti via The Associated Press courtesy of Ron Reeves.
AP Photo/Pat Sullivan.

USS TEXAS BB-35 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry
(Located On The Hazegray & Underway Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)

Crew Contact And Reunion Information

Contact Name: Mr. Arthur E Mayle
Address: 911 Free Way Melbourne, FL, 32940-6929
Phone: 407-242-0026
E-mail: None


Note About Contacts.

The contact listed, Was the contact at the time for this ship when located. If another person now is the contact, E-mail me and I will update this entry. These contacts are compiled from various sources over a long period of time and may or may not be correct. Every effort has been made to list the newest contact if more than one contact was found.


Additional Resources
Special Feature Battleship Texas BB-35
87 Images of the only surviving American Dreadnought. 87 High Resolution Images also available.
Unofficial Web Site By D. Mitchell.
Great site detailing the restoration work on the Texas (BB-35) and tons of other information.
Hazegray & Underway Battleship Pages By Andrew Toppan.
Official Web Site (State of Texas)

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