Please Report Any Broken Links Or Trouble You Might Come Across To The Webmaster.
Please Take A Moment To Let Us Know So That We Can Correct Any Problems And Make Your Visit As Enjoyable And As Informative As Possible.


NavSource Online: Battleship Photo Archive

BB-37 USS OKLAHOMA

Radio Call Sign: November - Alpha - Delta - November


Nevada Class Battleship: Displacement 27,500 Tons, Dimensions, 583' (oa) x 95' 3" x 29' 7" (Max) Armament 10 x 14"/45 21 x 5"/51, 2 x 21" tt. Armor, 13 1/2" Belt, 18" Triple Turrets, 16" Dual turrets, 3" Second (armor) Deck, 2 1/2" Third (splinter) Deck 16" Conning Tower. Machinery, 24,800 IHP; 2 vertical, Triple expansion engines, 2 screws. Speed, 20.5 Knots, Crew 864.

Operational and Building Data: Laid down by New York, Shipbuilding, Camden, NJ., October 26, 1912. Launched March 23, 1914. Commissioned May 2, 1916. Decommissioned (War Loss). Stricken September 1, 1944.
Fate: Sunk by Japanese aircraft during attack on Pearl Harbor Hawaii, December 7, 1941. Her hulk was raised in 1943, Sold for scrap December 5 1946. Hulk sank while under tow to breakers, 540 miles NE, Pearl Harbor, May 17, 1947. 20 Officers and 395 Men were lost with the ship and remain on duty.

In Memorium:

In the Second Book of Shmuel (Samuel), 22nd chapter, 5th through the 19th verses, translated from the original in Hebrew and published by the Koren Publishers of Jerusalem, Israel, can perhaps aptly describe the fate of the crew and all other U.S.sailors who died defending their county:

"When the waves of death compassed me / the floods of ungodly men made me afraid; / the bonds of She'ol encircled me; / the snares of death took me by surprise; / in my distress I called upon the Lord, / and cried to my G-D: / and he heard my voice out of his temple, / and my cry entered into his ears. / Then the earth shook and trembled; /the foundations of heaven moved / and shook because of his anger /...the heavy mass of waters, and thick clouds of the skies /... And the channels of the sea appeared, / the foundations of the world were laid bare, / at the rebuking of the Lord, at the blast at the breath of his nostrils. / He sent from above, he took me; / he drew me out of many waters; / he delivered me from my strong enemy, and from those who hated me; for they were too strong for me. / They surprised me in the day of my calamity: / but the Lord was my stay..."
Dante's Prayer courtesy of Loreena McKennitt via quinlanroad.com.
Click On Image
For Full Size Image
Size Image Description Contributed
By And/Or Copyright
Keel Laying / Commissioning
1912 - 1916

Proposed B.S. #36269k"Proposed B.S. #36".
Preliminary design plan prepared for the General Board during consideration of designs for Battleship # 36, which became the Nevada (BB-36 / 37) class. This plan, dated 4 March 1911, provides eight 14-inch guns, twin-screw reciprocating machinery and a speed of 21 knots in a ship 605 feet long on the load water line (L.W.L.), 95 feet in beam, with a normal displacement of 27,000 tons. The original plan is in the 1911-1925 "Spring Styles Book".
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # S-584-001.
BB-37 Oklahoma315kSilver Service Purchased by the State of Oklahoma at cost of S7,500 for Battleship Oklahoma (BB-37).Image and text provided by Oklahoma Historical Society.
Photo from Tulsa Daily World. (Tulsa, Indian Territory [Okla.]) 1905-1919, 08 March 1914, MORNING EDITION, Image 2, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet867k"Battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) on the ways before launching & Miss Cruce, her sponsor. Will stand under mistletoe to name huge dreadnought."
Champagne and State Flower To Be Used by Daughter of Oklahoma's Governor. Papa, She Says, Can't Come. Fearing to Leave State to Deputy.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 22 March 1914, Image 12, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-37 Oklahoma315kMODEL OF THE BIGGEST BATTLESHIP SOON TO BE LAUNCHED
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, 22 March 1914, FOURTH SECTION PICTORIAL MAGAZINE, Image 31, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet1.84kUncle Sam's Newest Dreadnought Fastest and Largest Afloat Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo & text by The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, 22 March 1914, SEVENTH SECTION, Image 74, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-37 Oklahoma426kThe Launching of Uncle Sam's Largest Dreadnought, the Battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) at the Camden Shipyards Last Monday at Noon.Image and text provided by Oklahoma Historical Society.
Photo from Tulsa Daily World. (Tulsa, Indian Territory [Okla.]) 1905-1919, 27 March 1914, MORNING EDITION, Image 1, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-37 Oklahoma377kThe Oklahoma (BB-37) is launched 23 March 1914. Image provided by: Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo by Charles. O. Haimovits, from The Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 01 March 1914, Night Extra, Image 20, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet903kTHE OKLAHOMA (BB-37) BEING TOWED TO BERTH AFTER LAUNCHING Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 March 1914, Image 16, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet544kNEW BATTLESHIP OKLAHOMA (BB-37) AS SHE APPEARED JUST AFTER FIRE ABOARD
The cross shows where water is being pumped out of the turret in which the mysterious night blaze was discovered as the new vessel lay in the yards of the New York Shipbuilding Company at Camden. That the ship is listing to a noticeable degree is evident from the direction of the waterline.
Image provided by: Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from The Evening Public Ledger.(Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 20 July 1915, Financial Edition, Night Extra, Image 1, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-37 Oklahoma 663k Run # 10 of the Oklahoma (BB-37), underway at 20.04 knots on preliminary trial at standardization course at Rockland, ME., 15 January 1916. US National Archives photo # 80G-1035099 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-37 Oklahoma447kOklahoma (BB-37), underway on preliminary trial at standardization course at Rockland, ME., 15 January 1916. Photo taken by American official photographer. Photo # Q 66283 from the collections of the Imperial War Museums. Part of the American First World War Official Exchange Collection.
Photo courtesy of Robert Hurst.
BB-37 Oklahoma 108k "U.S. super dreadnought Oklahoma (BB-37), latest and largest ship of the American Navy, shouldering along at more than twenty knots an hour on her first trial trip off the Maine coast a week ago." Photo by International News Service, text courtesy of N.Y. Times, 23 January 1916, Page 7, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Insert photo courtesy of 1916 edition of Popular Science via Robert Hurst.
Atlantic  Fleet573kOKLAHOMA (BB-37) OUR NEWEST GIANT SEA FIGHTER OFF FOR ITS TRIALS
The battleship Oklahoma, latest super dreadnought to be added to the United States navy, here seen as she passed beneath the Brooklyn bridge on her way to the coast of Maine for official trials, stood the first tests well. She developed a speed of 21.47 knots.
Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library & University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE.
Photo & text by The Logan Republican.(Logan, Utah) 1902-1924, 01 February 1916, Image 4 & The North Platte Semi-Weekly Tribune. (North Platte, Neb.) 1895-1922, 28 January 1916, Image 3 courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet2.64kTHE OKLAHOMA (BB-37) GREATEST BATTLESHIP IN UNITED STATES NAVY
1. Deck view of the battleship Oklahoma.
2. The dreadnaught steaming toward the Brooklyn navy yard immediately after her completion.
3. One of the fighting towers.
4. Battery of five fourteen-inch guns.
5. Another deck view.
Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota.
Photo & text by Grand Forks Daily Herald. , (Grand Forks, N.D.) 1914-1916, 29 January 1916, Image 9 courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
PDF added 07/23/15.
Atlantic  Fleet1.71kU. S. BATTLESHIP OKLAHOMA (BB-37)
THE NEW YORK SHIPBUILDING COMPANY

The battleship Oklahoma has completed her official trials off Rockland Maine making a full knot above her builder's guarantee, thus establishing a record as the fastest battleship in the US Navy.
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation
Photo from The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, 30 January 1916, Image 12, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet636kDREADNOUGHT OKLAHOMA (BB-37) COMPLETED, ENTERS SERVICE
The picture shows the latest addition to the navy as she appeared in the Delaware River after leaving the New York Shipbuilding yards in Camden for the Navy Yard, where she was put in commission this afternoon.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo & text by Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 02 May 1916, Night Extra, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet478kCEREMONIES ATTEND DREADNOUGHT OKLAHOMA'S (BB-37) ENTRY INTO SERVICE
This was the scene on the foreword deck of the Navy yard yesterday afternoon when her complement of 800 men and 50 officers were drawn up formally to receive the papers which put their ship into commission. Her flag, shown here, was the gift of the Daughters of Liberty and cost $500.
Image provided by: Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from The Evening Public Ledger.(Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 03 May 1916, Night Extra, Image 20, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet162kChart house of the Oklahoma (BB-37), Navy Yard New York, 19 July 1916. Photo Source: NARA College Park, Maryland, Record group "19-E-12-N USS Oklahoma BB-37 Interior 1916."
Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Atlantic  Fleet450kJunior Officer's Messroom, Navy Yard New York, 19 July 1916. Photo Source: NARA College Park, Maryland, Record group "19-E-12-N USS Oklahoma BB-37 Interior 1916."
Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Atlantic  Fleet434kC.P.O. Messroom, Navy Yard New York, 19 July 1916. Photo Source: NARA College Park, Maryland, Record group "19-E-12-N USS Oklahoma BB-37 Interior 1916."
Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Atlantic  Fleet474kSteering Room Showing Machinery, Navy Yard New York, 19 July 1916. Photo Source: NARA College Park, Maryland, Photo # 3173.
Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Atlantic  Fleet432kWardroom Pantry, Navy Yard New York, 19 July 1916. Photo Source: NARA College Park, Maryland, Record group "19-E-12-N USS Oklahoma BB-37 Interior 1916."
Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Atlantic  Fleet476k Laundry, Navy Yard New York, 19 July 1916. Photo Source: NARA College Park, Maryland, Record group "19-E-12-N USS Oklahoma BB-37 Interior 1916."
Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Atlantic  Fleet466kWarrant Officers Messroom, Navy Yard New York, 24 July 1916. Photo Source: NARA College Park, Maryland, Record group "19-E-12-N USS Oklahoma BB-37 Interior 1916."
Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Atlantic  Fleet442k Steering Room Showing Machinery, Navy Yard New York, 24 July 1916. Photo Source: NARA College Park, Maryland, Record group "19-E-12-N USS Oklahoma BB-37 Interior 1916."
Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Atlantic  Fleet561kPaint Room, Navy Yard New York, 5 August 1916. Photo Source: NARA College Park, Maryland, Record group "19-E-12-N USS Oklahoma BB-37 Interior 1916."
Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-37 Oklahoma 104k Crewmen cleaning the center 14"/45 gun of the battleship's after turret, circa 1916. USNHC # NH 44422.
Atlantic  Fleet519k The Battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) cutting the water at 20.5 knots in a recent demonstration trip for the Navy Department. Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star. , (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 05 November 1916, Image 76 courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
PDF added 07/23/15.
Atlantic  Fleet613kFIRING A SALVO OF FIVE-INCH GUNS AT NIGHT FROM OKLAHOMA (BB-37). Image and text provided by Kansas State Historical Society; Topeka, KS.
Photo & text by The Topeka State Journal. , (Topeka, Kan.) 1892-1980, 13 November 1916, HOME EDITION, Image 5 courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
PDF added 07/23/15.
1917 - 1929
BB-37 Oklahoma 67kCaptain Roger Welles was the commanding officer of the battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) from 2 May 1916 to 6 June 1917. Photo courtesy of the James Melville Gilliss Library via Bill Gonyo.
Atlantic  Fleet780kCOMMANDER ANDREWS
Adolphus Andrews, U. S. N., who is commander of the American battleship Oklahoma (BB-37).
Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH.
Photo & text by The Mahoning Dispatch. (Canfield, Mahoning County, Ohio) 1877-1968, 22 June, 1917, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-37 Oklahoma 85k Captain Spencer S. Wood was the commanding officer of the battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) from 6 June 1917 to 1 February 1918. Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress via of Bill Gonyo.
BB-37 Oklahoma 607k Photographed circa 1917, while painted in an experimental camouflage pattern. Text courtesy of USNHC # NH 44401.
US National Archives photo # 80G-1035101 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-37 Oklahoma 478k Starboard view, circa 1917. Photo courtesy of John A. Wetherington via George Wetherington.
K 142k LOOKING DOWN UPON THE DECK OF ONE OF UNCLE SAM'S BIG SEA FIGHTERS NOW PAYING A VISIT TO LEAUGE ISLAND.
Either the Nevada (BB-36) or Oklahoma (BB-37).
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from the Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.] 1914-1942, 03 February 1917, Night Extra, Image 16, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet554k"Teuton High Fliers must be aware of Uncle Sam's Eagle Eye."
While equipped with latest devices to destroy enemy submarines, the men behind the anti-aircraft gun on the battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) know how to use that weapon.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo & text by Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 29 June 1917, Final, Pictorial Section, Image 21, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet53kTHE EYES OF THE NAVY.
A naval observation balloon hovering over the fighting mast of the Oklahoma (BB-37).
Image provided by: Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo by Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 29 June 1917, Final, Pictorial Section, Image 22, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-37 Oklahoma 968kTorpedoes Ready for Launching
Here is shown a stern view of two torpedoes on board the battleship Oklahoma (BB-37), both ready for launching at an enemy. The propellers send them through the water at approximately 40 miles and hour, and the utmost accuracy can be obtained at moderate ranges. They each carry enough high explosives to send the most powerful German warship to the bottom. This photograph has been passed by the censor.
Image and text provided by Indiana State Library.
Photo & text by South Bend News-Times. (South Bend, Ind.) 1913-1938, 30 June 1917, AFTERNOON EDITION, Image 1, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
PDF added 07/23/15.
BB-37 Oklahoma 452kOklahoma's (BB-37) torpedo trolley. Photo courtesy of Tommy Trampp.
Photo added 07/23/15.
Atlantic  Fleet394kSOMETHING WE SELDOM SEE.
Few persons ever see this view of one of Uncle Sam's fighting ships. The photograph was taken from one of the fighting tops on the military mast of the dreadnought Oklahoma (BB-37), and shows her steel decks covered with their snow-white planking. Some idea of the immense size of this craft may be obtained by comparison with the officers standing on the deck near the stern.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 03 July 1917, Image 7, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet674kWash Day on the Oklahoma (BB-37). The Atlantic Ocean does its bit by helping to scrub the deck.
Backed by these giant 14-inch guns, our jackies fear no enemy warships. There are ten in the Oklahoma's batteries. Superdreadnoughts of the Pennsylvania class (BB-38/39) carry twelve.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 08 July 1917, Image 53, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet183kDREADNOUGHT OKLAHOMA(BB-37) FIRES AT IMAGINARY FOE
The dreadnought Oklahoma at battle practice.
"Somewhere on the Atlantic" this huge sea fighter is waiting for the chance to try conclusions with the flower of the kaiser's navy. The kaiser's ships probably will not venture out just because Uncle Sam and John Bull have many floating fortresses like this. The gunners on the Oklahoma are among the best in the world.
Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo & text by The Ogden Standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, 10 September 1917, 4 P.M. CITY EDITION, Image 5, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic Fleet58k"Armor piercing shells weighing half a ton or more apiece being loaded on an American Dreadnought that is preparing to sail for European waters."Photo by Central News Photo Service.
Partial text from The War of the Nations (New York) N.Y. Times, 31 December 1919, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-37 Oklahoma 177k Oklahoma (BB-37) anchored in the waterways of New York City during the late teens.USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-37 Oklahoma 148kCapt. Mark L. Bristol was the commanding officer of the battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) from 2 March 1918 to 14 October 1918. Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
BB-32/33610kTHE U. S. NAVY DEBATING TEAM
Showing several possible methods of closing an argument, now in preparation on board our dreadnoughts.
The answer to these 14-inch arguments is: "O, very well! Have it your own way, then!
Bringing up a little something for the 5-inch gun.
A couple of torpedoes. Why say more?
(The Oklahoma (BB-37) is probably the focus of all the photos here.)
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 23 June 1918, Image 57, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-37 Oklahoma 72k Oklahoma (BB-37) underway off Brest, France, on 13 December 1918, while escorting President Woodrow Wilson's transport, George Washington (ID-3018) into port. A Brest pilot boat is under sail in the foreground. USNHC # NH 57233.
Sixth Battle Squadron72kBattleships of the Sixth Battle Squadron (anchored in column in the left half of the photograph) included the:
Florida (BB-30)
Utah (BB-31)
Wyoming (BB-32)
Arkansas (BB-33)
New York (BB-34)
Texas (BB-35)
Nevada (BB-36)
Oklahoma (BB-37)
Pennsylvania (BB-38)
& Arizona (BB-39) at one time or another.
There are only three of the battleships present in this photo at Brest, France, on 13 December 1918. George Washington (ID-3018), which had just carried President Woodrow Wilson from the United States to France, is in the right background. Photographed by Zimmer
USNHC # NH 63454.
BB-36 Nevada 314k The picture is clearly labeled as Florida (BB-30), but there are several characteristics of this ship that don’t seem to match the Florida (BB-30/31) class.
First, the picture in question clearly has one stack, while the Florida had two until her modernization in 1926.
Second, the Florida had five turrets, with turrets D & E being mounted back-to-back, with turret C mounted one level above. However, the picture in question clearly has four turrets, with turret C superimposed above turret D.
Third, the twelve-inch turrets of the Florida class had flat tops. However, if you look closely at the turrets of the ship in this picture (especially at the rear part of turret D), you can see that the turrets on this ship have curved tops.
As a result of the ship in this picture having a single stack and four turrets with curved tops, this would limit the choices to a Nevada or Pennsylvania class (BB-38/9) ship. However, based on two primary characteristics of the ship in this picture, I believe this is a Nevada class ship.
First, the notch at the stern of the ship, which I don't believe I've ever seen in a picture of a Pennsylvania class (BB-38 / 39) ship, but is clearly visible in the picture of the Oklahoma (BB-37).
Second, the location of the stack very close to the foremast, as shown in this picture of the Nevada.
The picture of the Arizona (BB-39) shows that the stack was a little further back from the mainmast in a Pennsylvania class.

If you focus in on the stern of the ship, just forward of the step and just below the main deck edge the ship's name is visible. Though the letters are not readable, what is evident is that it is a long name. Having narrowed the vessel down to 2 ships, one of whose name is twice as long as her sister, I think it is safe to identify this ship as Oklahoma and not Nevada. The Oklahoma in port with the destroyer Fairfax (DD-93), sometime after 27 October 1918, when she arrived at Brest for patrol and escort duty in European waters.
On 3 December 1918, Fairfax arrived in the Azores to meet and escort to Brest, the transport George Washington (ID-3018) carrying President W. Wilson to the Peace Conference. She sailed for home 21 December, reaching Norfolk 8 January 1919.
Text courtesy of DANFS.
Photo i.d. & text courtesy of Ronald J. Nash & Chris Hoehn.
USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-37 Oklahoma 94kOklahoma (BB-37) anchored in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 1 April 1919. Panoramic photograph by L.C. Grant with Falk Photo Company, Boston, Massachusetts. Note the steam launch in the center foreground, and the wavy nature of the image, the result of the rocking of the photographer's boat as the panoramic camera scanned along Oklahoma's length. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105064.
New York Harbor1.78k"American dreadnoughts & super-dreadnoughts steaming into New York harbor 14 April 1919."
The Texas (BB-35) leads the procession with a airplane on her turret catapult. Note the escorting biplane.
The "escorting" aircraft is either a Curtiss HS-1 or HS-2 (note the single engine) can't tell which from the photo. The aircraft on a fly-off platform atop the No. 2 turret of the Texas is 1 of 6 Sopwith Camels purchased from Britain at the end of the war.
The platforms were a British concept designed to provide the fleet with an aircraft capable of reaching the high flying Zeppelins which the German Navy occasionally used as scouts. The Texas was the only US Battleship to be fitted with turret fly-off platforms while in Europe and was the test bed for this program in the US Navy. Not visible in this view is a stripped down (No fabric and no wings) Sopwith 1-1/2 Strutter lashed atop the No. 3 Turret. The platforms were eventually mounted on all 14" gun BB's through the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class (with mixed reviews from their commanders) and carried either a Hanriot HD-1 or a Neiuport 28. Though equipped inflatable floats for water landings, this tended to do a lot of damage not the least of which was dowsing a hot engine in cold salt water. By 1920 a successful compressed air catapult was developed and were being mounted on the aft deck of all 4 turreted battleships and fly-off platforms were removed. The Texas and New York (BB-34), because of their 5 Turrets, lacked the deck space for the catapult and had to make do with a float plane (Vought VE-7) sitting on the aft deck which would be launched by lowering it over the side for a surface take-off.
If you look carefully at the photo you see the VE-7 on the deck and the A-frame hoist used for handling it.
Photo by Paul Thompson.
Text courtesy of N.Y. Times, page 481, from The War of the Nations (New York), 31 December 1919, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
Atlantic  Fleet975kHow the Atlantic Fleet looked to the camera man in a seaplane flying over lower Manhattan a week ago yesterday morning as the mighty armada came up the bay to anchorage in the Hudson off Riverside Drive for a two weeks' vacation after months of strenuous maneuvers in Southern waters. The destroyers Dale (DD-290) and Flusser (DD-289) are shown leading the column of eight dreadnoughts: Oklahoma (BB-37), Nevada (BB-36), Arizona (BB-39), flagship Pennsylvania (BB-38), Utah (BB-31), Florida (BB-30), North Dakota (BB-29) and Delaware (BB-28) past the Statue of Liberty at a fifteen-knot clip. In addition to the big battleships, the fleet includes thirty-two destroyers, numerous supply ships and several submarines.
The Atlantic battleship fleet is home: again. Here are the twelve great first line fighting ships that are paying Father Knickerbocker a two weeks' visit. Over a hundred of Uncle Sam's grim sea warriors gray the North River, while their 30,000 sailor-men are given the freedom of the city in a royal welcome home.
The Battleship Mississippi (BB-41) leading the fleet into the harbor, as photographed from an airplane. Note the airplanes atop the forward and aft turrets.
Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 20 April 1919, Image 48. courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet907kAiring day" on the U. S. battleship Oklahoma . At first glance this might appear to be a camouflaged ship, but it shows the "gobs" lined up for "bedding drill." while their bedding adorns the rails. Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by Evening Star. (Washington, D.C.) 1854-1972, 17 August 1919, Image 72, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-37 Oklahoma 3.34k "The towering hull of the Oklahoma (BB-37) has a keel that is very heavily weighted to offset the ponderous armament above." Photo by International News Agency.
Text courtesy from The War of the Nations (New York) N.Y. Times, 31 December 1919, Page 376, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-37 Oklahoma 3.34k "Part of the main battery of five fourteen inch guns on one of the latest and most formidable of United States dreadnoughts." Photo by Central News.
Text courtesy from The War of the Nations (New York) N.Y. Times, 31 December 1919, Page 376, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-37 Oklahoma 93k "Torpedo of the 21 inch type being gotten ready to be lowered into the hold of the Oklahoma (BB-37). Expelled from the tube by compressed air, is self propelling, explodes on contact and has charge of 200 pounds of gun powder." Photo by Central News Photo Service.
Partial text from The War of the Nations (New York) N.Y. Times, 31 December 1919, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-37 Oklahoma 71k Halftone reproduction of a photograph taken on the ship's main deck, looking aft along the starboard side, circa 1918-1919. This view was published circa 1919 as one of ten images in a "Souvenir Folder" concerning Oklahoma (BB-37). USNHC # NH 105735. Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2008.
BB-37 Oklahoma 67kHalftone reproduction of a photograph taken in the ship's officers' ward room, circa 1918-1919. This view was published circa 1919 as one of ten images in a "Souvenir Folder" concerning Oklahoma (BB-37). USNHC # NH 105734. Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2008.
BB-37 Oklahoma 69kHalftone reproduction of a photograph looking forward from near the ship's stern, showing her after 14"/45 guns, circa 1918-1919. Note the destroyers tied up alongside. This view was published circa 1919 as one of ten images in a "Souvenir Folder" concerning Oklahoma (BB-37). USNHC # NH 105736. Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2008.
BB-37 Oklahoma 73k Halftone reproduction of a photograph taken in the crew's galley, circa 1918-1919. This view was published circa 1919 as one of ten images in a "Souvenir Folder" concerning Oklahoma (BB-37). USNHC # NH 105737. Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2008.
BB-37 Oklahoma 73kHalftone reproduction of a photograph taken in a crew's compartment, circa 1918-1919. Note the 5"/51 gun at far right and hammock hooks mounted on the beams overhead. This view was published circa 1919 as one of ten images in a "Souvenir Folder" concerning Oklahoma (BB-37). USNHC # NH 105738. Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2008.
BB-37 Oklahoma 71k Halftone reproduction of a photograph taken in the ship's surgical operating room, circa 1918-1919. This view was published circa 1919 as one of ten images in a "Souvenir Folder" concerning Oklahoma (BB-37). USNHC # NH 105739. Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2008.
BB-37 Oklahoma 74kHalftone reproduction of a photograph taken in the ship's sick bay, circa 1918-1919 This view was published circa 1919 as one of ten images in a "Souvenir Folder" concerning Oklahoma (BB-37). USNHC # NH 105740. Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2008.
BB-37 Oklahoma 71kHalftone reproduction of a photograph taken on the ship's forecastle, looking aft toward her forward 14"/45 guns and bridge, circa 1918-1919. Note the anchor handling facilities in the foreground. This view was published circa 1919 as one of ten images in a "Souvenir Folder" concerning Oklahoma (BB-37). USNHC # NH 105741. Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2008.
BB-37 Oklahoma 77k Halftone reproduction of a photograph looking toward the bow from the ship's bridge, with her forward 14"/45 gun turrets in the foreground, circa 1918-1919. Note what appears to be a gun-leveling device placed across the two guns of Turret # 2. This view was published circa 1919 as one of ten images in a "Souvenir Folder" concerning Oklahoma (BB-37). USNHC # NH 105742. Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2008.
BB-37 Oklahoma 76k Underway, 1919. Larry Bonn / USN photo.
BB-37 Oklahoma 54k Captain Noble E. Irwin was the commanding officer of the battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) from 9 July 1919 to 5 July 1921.Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
BB-37 Oklahoma 794k Guantanamo Bay Cuba, 1 January 1920 early in her career. She is shown here with flying off platforms extended over both her super-firing turrets, her flying bridge transformed into an enclosed navigating bridge, and her torpedo-defense platforms enclosed in vee-front windscreens. Long based armored range finders surmount both navigating bridge & No. 3 turret. Note that three 5-inch guns are missing, one right forward, and two aft, together with the single gun at the extreme stern. Unlike earlier battleships, these ships never had antiaircraft guns atop their derrick posts. One such weapon is visible abaft the 5in/51 gun on the 01 level. Other such weapons were added later. The two starboard 5-inch directors are visible, one just abaft her funnel and one abaft the break of her forecastle, abeam her mainmast. Note, too, the long-base range finder atop No.2 turret, at its rear. Text courtesy of U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-37 Oklahoma 88k Starboard broadside view of an anchored Nevada (BB-36) or Oklahoma (BB-37) in a warm climate, possibly at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, 1 January 1920. Photo courtesy of Tim Muir.
BB-36 1.46k A painting by the artist Wayne Scarpaci entitled 'Into the Storm'.
This is my latest effort on the Battleship Nevada Centennial Project. It shows the Nevada in 1920 with sister ship Oklahoma (BB-37) and near sister Arizona (BB-39). Notice the 'Flying Off' platform atop turret 2. The platform folded out over the gun barrels and a wheeled aircraft would take off unassisted. The ship was unable to recover the plane so it would have to fly to a shore base to land. Starting in the mid-1920's compressed air launch catapults for floatplanes were added to all US battleships on their fantails. A light derrick type crane was added to the very stern to hoist the aircraft back aboard. In the the mid 1930's the compressed air catapult was replaced with a powder launch type (Which used a 5" powder charge). And a second catapult was added to the top of turret 3 and heavier crane added astern to handle the ever increasing weight of the aircraft carried. Early in WWII the catapult atop turret 3 was removed in all US battleships. In 1947 the USN cancelled the shipboard floatplane program and removed the catapults from all ships. All three of the ships in this painting were sunk at Pearl Harbor and only Nevada was returned to service.
Photo and text courtesy of artbywayne.com
BB-37 Oklahoma 835k A French built Nieuport 28 aircraft is alongside the Oklahoma (BB-37) circa 1920. The ship is anchored at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba and the plane will be hoisted aboard for flight operation trials. The United States procured a number of foreign built aircraft after World War One, using them to conduct experiments flying off wooden decks erected on battleships. US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 1996.253.7217 via Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 62kA Neiuport 28 aboard the Oklahoma (BB-37). Twelve of the Army Nieuports were transferred to the US Navy which equipped them with hydro vanes to prevent a nose over in the event of a water landing and wing floatation gear. The Navy then flew them from specially built platforms that were mounted above the forward turrets of 8 battleships, including the Oklahoma, Arizona (BB-39) and Pennsylvania (BB-38). These aircraft once launched from one of these platforms were considered expendable. They had no provision for landing on the ships. When a land base was not within range the pilots were expected to ditch and await rescue. USN photo & text courtesy of airminded.net via Chris Hoehn. American Aviators of WW I
BB-37 Oklahoma 442k Oklahoma (BB-37) with a float plane on her stern catapult, circa 1920. US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 1985.055.001.038 via Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 784k Lots of activity on board the Oklahoma (BB-37) as the ship seems to be prepared for liberty. US National Archives photo # 80G-1035100 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
Atlantic  Fleet452kBATTLESHIP OKLAHOMA (BB-37), SENT TO KEY WEST IN READINESS TO PROCEED TO MEXICO, HER CAPTAIN AND COMMANDER OF MARINESImage and text provided by University of Oregon Libraries; Eugene, OR.
Photo & text by East Oregonian E.O. (Pendleton, Umatilla Co., Or.) 1888-current, 22 May 1920, DAILY EDITION, Image 4, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico963kGETTING READY TO PROTECT AMERICAN CITIZENS
The U.S. battleship Oklahoma (BB-37), lying in Hudson river, New York, taking on supplies from freight barges in preparation for its trip to Key West for protection of American citizens who are in Mexico.
Photo by American Press Association.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.] 1914-1942, 17 May 1920, Night Extra, Image 2, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-37 Oklahoma 433kSopwith leaving Oklahoma (BB-37) on 13 August 1920. Digital ID: # npcc 29712, LC-F82-5389. Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division.
DRYDOCKS 658k HOISTING A PLANE ON BOARD THE OKLAHOMA (BB-37).
IT WOULD BE EASIER FOR A LINER to PICK UP PLANES FROM THE PlER
PLANE ABOARD NEVADA (BB-36). NOTE SMALL SPACE REQUIRED FOR HOUSING
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo & text by The Sun and the New York Herald.(New York [N.Y.]) 1920-1920, 29 August 1920, Section 4 Sunday Magazine, Image 48, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-37 Oklahoma 141k Circa early 1920's photo of the Oklahoma (BB-37) with a seaplane on her stern catapult & training markings painted on fore and aft top turrets.USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-37 Oklahoma 175k Circa early 1920's photo of the Oklahoma (BB-37) with what looks like the results of a target practice sheet between her two masts.USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Atlantic and Pacific Fleets49k"Combined Atlantic and Pacific Fleets in Panama Bay, 21st January. 1921". Right section (of three) of a panoramic photograph taken by M.C. Mayberry, of Mayberry and Smith, Shreveport, Louisiana.
Among the ships present in this image are (from left to right): Sicard (DD-346), Hatfield (DD-231), North Dakota (BB-29), Delaware (BB-28), Brazos (AO-4), Prometheus (AR-3), Utah (BB-31), Oklahoma (BB-37), Bridge (AF-1), Nevada (BB-36), Schenck (DD-159), Arizona (BB-39), Black Hawk (AD-9), Dickerson (DD-157), Dahlgren (DD-187), Herbert (DD-160), Columbia (CA-16), Cleveland (PG-33), Tacoma (PG-32), Semmes (DD-189) and one other destroyer.
Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation, D.H. Criswell Collection. Photo # NH 86082-C, courtesy of Naval Historical Center.
BB-37 Oklahoma 2.81k Oklahoma (BB-37) in drydock at the Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, VA., in 1920.Photo from the Robert J. Lewis collection.
Photo courtesy of Butch & Debbie Baxter.
BB-37 Oklahoma 819k Stern view of the Oklahoma (BB-37) dry docked at an unknown location sometime in the 1920's. A Vought UO-1 is secured on the stern catapult. US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 2000.003.001, via Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 19k Capt. Edwin Taylor Pollock was the commanding officer of the battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) from 5 July 1921 to 13 January 1922. Photo courtesy of the James Melville Gilliss Library via Bill Gonyo.
BB-36 Nevada1.80k Nevada (BB-36 / 37) class battleships with all their main turrets trained to starboard during a Fleet Problem with other battleships during the early 1920s. The other ship is too far away to positively identify.USN photo via USNIP submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-37 Oklahoma468kBattleship Oklahoma (BB-37) and What Her Guns Can Do
THIS a salvo from her 14 inch guns. Below is shown her target riddled by shot. The range was 10 miles.
Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ.
Photo from Mohave County Miner and Our Mineral Wealth. (Kingman, Ariz.) 1918-1922, 20 October 1922, Image 6, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-37 Oklahoma973kCOUSIN WARREN guides the destinies of the nation in Washington and Cousin Willie the fortunes of a mop on the deck of the battleship Oklahoma (BB-37), now at anchor in Los Angeles harbor. William H. Harding, age nineteen, said to be a cousin of President Harding, is a "gob" in the service of Uncle Sam.Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 16 November 1922, MID-DAY EDITION, Image 21, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-37 Oklahoma 137k 1922, Underway, Shows good detail. Note forward 5" gun mount area has been sealed off due to allowing large amounts of water to enter the ship at high speed. Steven G. Taylor / USN photo.
BB-37 Oklahoma 85k Shown here in the early 1920's conducting gunnery practice in the Pacific. Her Sistership Nevada (BB-36) follows astern.USN photo.
BB-36 Nevada66kSteaming with other battleships, during the early 1920s. Oklahoma (BB-37) is in the left background. The other ship is either Pennsylvania (BB-38) or Arizona (BB-39).USNHC # NH 50109.
BB-28 Delaware819kPanoramic photo of the U.S. fleet in Panama Bay (Pacific entrance to the Panama Canal) on 1 March 1923. 70 vessels are viewed; the Battle Fleet consists of all U.S. battleships from the Delaware (BB-28) through the Idaho (BB-42). Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, courtesy of Tom Kermen. Copyright R.G. Lewis, Y Photo Shop, Balboa, C.Z."
BB-37 Oklahoma 736k Overhead view of the Oklahoma (BB-37) anchored at an unknown location circa 1923. She is accompanied by an oil slick. US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 2004.042.057 via Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 720k 23 June 1923 photo of a Navy Vought UO-1 being catapulted off the Oklahoma (BB-37). This UO-1 was the first aircraft to be catapulted off the ship on that day. US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No.2011.003.187.029 via Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 76kCAPT W. Pitt Scott, USN, pictured aboard the battleship Oklahoma (BB-37), shortly after becoming the ship's Commanding Officer in July of 1923.USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-37 Oklahoma 291k Oklahoma (BB-37) moored at Melbourne, VIC, Australia on 23 July 1925. The photo, looking forward from the stern, shows a Vought OU-1 reconnaissance aircraft mounted on the aft catapult. The fleet is hosting public visitation during the Fleet's visit to Australia. Source: Australian War Memorial, Photo No. P00612.001 via Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 195k Oklahoma (BB-37) on 23 July 1925 at Melbourne, Australia during a U.S. Navy Fleet visit. Source: Australian War Memorial, Photo No. P00612.009 via Mike Green.
BB-38 2.35k The Pennsylvania (BB-38) follows other battleships during maneuvers. The first three ships in the background are Nevada (BB-36), Oklahoma (BB-37), and Arizona (BB-39) in that order. However, the photo pre-dates the 1925 Australia/ New Zealand tour since Oklahoma lacks the enlarged lookout stations on the cagemasts. Photo i.d. & text courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-37 Oklahoma 152k Overhead showing deck details, 1920's. National Archives / USN photo.
BB-37 Oklahoma 148k 12 page PDF Oklahoma (BB-37) Navy Day Booklet (including cover) from Monterey, CA 1924. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Melbourne 488k Oklahoma (BB-37) (foreground) visited Melbourne together with the fleet flagship Seattle (ACR-11) (background) and two other battleships during 1924-25. Photo & text courtesy of Allan Greene via Chris Howell.
Melbourne 546k Stern view of the Oklahoma (BB-37) in Melbourne during 1924-25. Photo courtesy of Allan Greene via Chris Howell.
Melbourne 514k Port bow view of the Oklahoma (BB-37) in Melbourne during 1924-25. Photo courtesy of Allan Greene via Chris Howell.
BB-37 Oklahoma 199k Oklahoma (BB-37) joined the Pacific Fleet for six years highlighted by the cruise of the Battle Fleet to Australia and New Zealand in 1925. She is pictured here that year firing a broadside during gunnery practice. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-37 Oklahoma 67k Oklahoma (BB-37) Ship's Dance Invitation, 3 July 1926 at Seattle, Washington.USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-32 Wyoming489kNavy Day Program: Philadelphia Navy Yard celebrates "Navy Day" on 27 October 1927. The map in the program shows Wyoming (BB-32) at Pier 8 south side undergoing modernization. The Oklahoma (BB-37) is at Pier 5. Photo courtesy of Ron Reeves.
BB-32 Wyoming493k Philadelphia Navy Yard celebrates "Navy Day" on 27 October 1927. The map in the program shows Wyoming (BB-32) at Pier 8 south side undergoing modernization. The Oklahoma (BB-37) is at Pier 5. Photo courtesy of Ron Reeves.
Battlefleet122kWatercolor of a Presidential review during President Hoover's term of office, 1928-32.
Crews line the rails of a Colorado class (BB-45 / 48) battleship as the ships pass in line astern of the reviewing stand with the airship Los Angeles (ZR-3) piercing the clouds accompanied by 9 biplanes.
Courtesy of Michael Schwarz.
Battlefleet56kView of the U.S. Battlefleet from above, possibly from the airship Los Angeles (ZR-3). Photo courtesy of periscopefilm.com.
BB-37 Oklahoma 122k Oklahoma (BB-37) is shown undergoing modernization at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, circa 1928. Installation of her new tripod masts is well along, but the rest of her superstructure must still be fitted.
From 16 September 1927 to 15 July 1929, the Oklahoma was rebuilt at the Philadelphia Navy Yard. Anti-torpedo blisters were added to the hull. The oil fired boilers were upgraded with replacements, but the reciprocating engines were not replaced nor upgraded. The two 21 inch submerged torpedo tubes were removed. All of superstructure above the main deck was removed except for the four 14 inch main turrets and the conning tower. This included the cage masts, the bridge, the funnel, and all the fire control systems. The cage masts were replaced with tripods. A new tower bridge was constructed. 5 inch fire control directors were superimposed above the main battery directors on top of both masts. A shortened funnel was built with four searchlights grouped around it.
The Mark 7 single purpose 5 inch/51 guns were removed from the side of the hull, below the main deck, and the gun ports plated over. They were replaced with eight Mark 10 5 inch/25 dual purpose antiaircraft guns that were added on top of a new deck-house at the 01 level. Eight 50 caliber machine guns were added, four each on top of the foremast and the mainmast. Compressed air Mark I catapults were also added.
USNHC # NH 74634. Text courtesy of Robert M. Ceiri.
BB-37 Oklahoma 403k Oklahoma (BB-37) off the Philadelphia Navy Yard after modernization, 21 August 1929. US National Archives photo # 19lc-22-f 1, from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-37 Oklahoma 317k Oklahoma (BB-37) shows off her port quarter off the Philadelphia Navy Yard after modernization, 21 August 1929. US National Archives photo # 19lc-22-f 2, from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-37 Oklahoma 226k At Philadelphia Naval Ship Yard, 29 August 1929 after being rebuilt. USN photo.
1930 - Pre-Pearl Harbor Attack
BB-37 Oklahoma 186k Oklahoma (BB-37) and other battleships of the Pacific fleet line abreast with their guns trained to port, 1930. USN photo # 80-G-466465 courtesy of interwarnavy.org via Bill Gonyo.
BB-37 Oklahoma 142k 1930's photo of the Oklahoma (BB-37) in her final configuration. Notched stern is easily visible. A single 5" anti-destroyer gun was originally mounted in this position for protecting her stern from torpedo attack. The gun is long gone with the position plated over, the notch remaining throughout her life. USN photo # 80-G-1021412 courtesy of interwarnavy.org via Bill Gonyo.
BB-34 New York94k New York (BB-34) leading Nevada (BB-36) and Oklahoma (BB-37) during maneuvers, 1932. The carrier Langley (CV-1) is partially visible in the distance.Official USN photo # NH 48138, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-39 Arizona1.97kThe sun sets on Oklahoma (BB-37). Look at the shadows coming off the barrels on turret #2 with all her flags flying in her glory in 1932.
The easiest visual identifier between the Nevada class battleships is - compare the height of the AA platforms on the two ships' forward tripods. Oklahoma's is noticeably higher, and Nevada's (BB-36) is about even with the top of the stack.
Photo by E.V. Conrad.
Text i.d. courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Photo courtesy of Kerry Garrett.
BB-37 Oklahoma 104kAn anchored Oklahoma (BB-37) in company with at least one other battleship, probably off the California coast sometime in the 1930's. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-36 Nevada199k 1930's image of the Oklahoma (BB-37) anchored with her rear turrets trained to port.USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-37 Oklahoma 149k Oil on canvas painting by the artist James Flood entitled "Oklahoma (BB-37) - 1936". This picture depicts the Oklahoma underway in a harbor. Photo and partial text courtesy of oldgloryprints.com
BB-36 Nevada146kA hand-colored photo of the battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) as she enters San Francisco Bay on 3 July 1930. US Naval Historical Center photo # NH-84547-KN. Photo courtesy of the USS Oklahoma Association, Collection of Joseph E. Vargo. Submitted by Robert M. Cieri.
BB-37 Oklahoma 80k Passing Alcatraz prison, San Francisco Bay, California, during the 1930s. USN photo from the WARSHIP SERIES #7--"PARALLEL FATES--The Utah (BB-31/AG-16) and the Oklahoma (BB-37) in Peace and in War", by Harvey M. Beigel, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 67k Commemorative post mark on the occasion of Oklahoma (BB-37) at Seattle, Washington during Fleet Week, 29 July 1935. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
BB-39 Arizona695kModernized at Philadelphia between September 1927 and July 1929, Oklahoma (BB-37) rejoined the Scouting Fleet for exercises in the Caribbean, and returned to the west coast in June 1930 for fleet operations through spring 1936. That summer she carried midshipmen on a European training cruise, visiting northern ports. The cruise was interrupted with the outbreak of civil war in Spain, as Oklahoma sped to Bilbao, arriving 24 July 1936 to rescue American citizens and other refugees whom she carried to Gibraltar and French ports.
She is seen here at Gibraltar.
Text courtesy of DANFS.
Photo courtesy of Kerry Garrett.
BB-36 Nevada219kOklahoma (BB-37) transiting the Panama Canal. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
BB-37 Oklahoma 78k Oklahoma (BB-37) crewmen holding evacuated children, as refugees are embarked at Bilboa, Spain, during the Spanish Civil War, August 1936. These men have been identified as (from left to right): Lloyd A. Payne (possibly), Chief Petty Officers Fuchs, and Slajus. Note dog. USNHC photo # NH 50969, courtesy of Captain W.A. Hall, USN, 1936.
BB-37 Oklahoma 91k1936 photo of the Oklahoma (BB-37). USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-37 Oklahoma 62k1936 photo of the Oklahoma (BB-37) in a West Coast port. USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-37 Oklahoma 220k Oklahoma (BB-37) and the Pacific Fleet during the late 30's. USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-37 Oklahoma 55kLate 1930's photo of the Oklahoma (BB-37) with accompanying small boats plying the waves alongside. Her portside anchors are up. Note the lack of scouting airplanes on her catapults. They more than likely had been flown off once the ship arrived at or approached port. USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-37 Oklahoma 64k Native kids swimming. The crew would flip coins in the water for them to dive for. Not sure of where the picture was taken but because of the entire stern awning was rigged for shade. Circa 1940. Photo i.d. courtesy of Tom Jacobs.
Photo courtesy of George Klos.
BB-37 Oklahoma 91k Photographed circa 1940, with SOC seaplanes on her catapults. Photographed by George Winstead. USNHC # NH 77076.
Lahaina859kPhoto of part of the Pacific Fleet in 1940 at Lahaina, Maui.
It is possible that the battleship on the left is the California (BB-44). If you look at the top of the armored conning tower there is a thin vertical structure at the rear on top of the conning tower, just in front of the superstructure.
The center battleship is definitely Oklahoma because of the higher platform.
I believe the rightmost battleship is a Pennsylvania class (BB-38/39) because the height of the forward superstructure beneath the foremast is higher than the middle battleship, as shown by the fact that it's roughly the same height as the top of the stack, which was true of the Pennsylvania's after their rebuild. I also believe that this can be narrowed down to be Pennsylvania rather than Arizona (BB-39) because of the height of the armored conning tower in front of the superstructure and behind turret 2. As can be seen in this picture of the Pennsylvania, which was taken at nearly the same angle, the conning tower is one deck higher than on the Arizona, shown here
Partial text i.d. courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large. Photo courtesy of Floyd Proffitt via Brad Proffitt.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Ron Nash.
BB-40 New Mexico & family463kProbable front and rear photos here and below showing formations of aircraft flying over U.S. Navy battleships during exercises at sea, circa late 1930's - 1940.
Pictured here is a New Mexico (BB-40 /42) class battleship in the van with other battleships of the Pacific Fleet and a carrier air group, led by the Air Group Commander in a Curtiss SBC Helldiver.
The aircraft following are:
A torpedo squadron of eighteen Douglas TBD-1s;
A bombing squadron of eighteen Northrop BT-1s;
A scouting squadron eighteen Curtiss SBCs;
A fighting squadron of eighteen Grumman F2F-1s or F3F-3s from either the Yorktown (CV-5) or F3F-2s from the Enterprise (CV-6), plus possibly nine additional aircraft.
The Yorktown and Enterprise were the only two carriers whose bombing squadrons were equipped with the Northrop BT-1.
The text for the photo reads:
"The Navy uses enormous amounts of rubber. At least seventy-five tons of rubber, enough to makes 17,000 tires, are used in the construction of each of these battleships. Tons more are needed for the naval planes that are making history over the world. Medical and communication requirements--and countless other needs of the Navy--are met."
The lead BB looks like Mississippi (BB-41) followed by Maryland (BB-46) (rangefinder on Turret II). My first impression of the Tennessee class (BB-43 /44) is the Tennessee (BB-43), but that is not a certain ID from this photo alone. Fourth is the Oklahoma (BB-37) (no birdbath). Aside from the DD now in the lead, I see nothing in the head-on shot aerial that positively differs from the ID's of the first 4 BB's in the first photo. Of course, in the aft aerial shot, BB #5 is the California (BB-44), ID'd by the enlarged flag bridge, lending support to BB #3 in the first photo being Tennessee. Everything I see supports these three photos all being part of the same operation with at least the first 5 BB's remaining in the same order.
Photograph # LC-USE64 - DC-000944 & partial text courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Battleship i.d. & text courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Aircraft i.d. & text & timeline courtesy of Alan Moore via the following sources: Airplane i.d.: Yorktown Class Carriers (Warship Pictorial No. 9) by Steve Wiper, Tucson, AZ: Classic Warships Publishing, 2000. & That Gallant Ship: U.S.S. Yorktown (CV-5) by Robert Cressman, Missoula, MT: Pictorial Histories Pub Co, 1985. Timeline from Battleship Arizona: An Illustrated History by Paul Stillwell, Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1991.
BB-40 New Mexico & family1.62kProbable front and rear photos here and above showing formations of aircraft flying over U.S. Navy battleships during exercises at sea, circa late 1930's - 1940.
In both photos, one of the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) is leading the BB column while the remaining battleships have dual masthead fire control structures.
The air group formation in the two photos appears to be similar. The composition of 18 TBDs, 18 BT-1s, 18 SBCs, and 27 fighters is easier to distinguish in the front/surface view. I'm assuming, based on total aircraft count alone, that the formation in the rear/aerial view is the same. (The perspective makes it difficult to sort the monoplanes and biplanes into their respective types.) The only difference is that in the front/surface view the formation is lead by a Curtiss SBC Helldiver (likely the Air Group Commander) but in the rear/aerial view that lead Helldiver is not present. I suppose it's possible that the photographer was in that Helldiver's rear seat. What stands out for me is the presence of nine extra fighters beyond the normal squadron composition of 18, as seen in the other three squadrons in this formation.
Photo i.d courtesy of Chuck Haberlein, Richard Jensen, Aryeh Wetherhorn, & Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Battleship i.d. & text courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Aircraft i.d. & text courtesy of Alan Moore.
US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, photo No. 2008.104.001.234.
BB-39 Arizona1.31kBetween 9 & 13 September 1940 the Arizona (BB-39) was under way with other ships of the US Fleet for simulated fleet engagement. She is pictured here in company with other ships of the Pacific Fleet taken during Fleet Ops. and at least one carrier air group.Scanned from: "The Fleet Today" by Kendall Banning. Funk & Wagnalls Company, N.Y. and London, 1942. Submitted by Pieter Bakels.
Text & photo i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore via Battleship Arizona: An Illustrated History by Paul Stillwell, Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1991.
BB-37 Oklahoma 253k Oklahoma's (BB-37) bow plows through the sea & foam during this late life photo. USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-37 Oklahoma 449k Oklahoma (BB-37) bag inspection. USN photo courtesy of Tommy Trampp.
BB-37 Oklahoma 2.60k Oklahoma (BB-37) with her full compliment of scout planes on their catapults lie in port during the later part of her career. USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com
BB-37 Oklahoma 1.60k Oklahoma (BB-37) & two of her sisters have their moments in the sun in 1940. Photo courtesy of Ron Reeves.
BB-37 Oklahoma 90k Oklahoma (BB-37) inboard profile, 1941. Note the skeg added aft in a 1936 Puget Sound refit. The vertical tube abaft No.2 barbette was a 3-inch ammunition hoist for the antiaircraft weapons added as an emergency measure. Note also the big protected air duct installed during modernization, similar to that in the latter U.S. battleships. Photo and text courtesy of U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
BB-37 Oklahoma 181k Oklahoma (BB-37) in 1941, line drawing by A.D. Baker III. Photo and text courtesy of U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
BB-37 Oklahoma 94k Oklahoma (BB-37) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard in February, 1941 finishing up what turned out to be her final refit. Her antiaircraft directors and range finders have been consolidated unto the large armored box visible at the rear end of her range finder platform. The structure at the base of her foremast leg was a new air defense control station. Four locally controlled 3-inch/50 guns were also added. One is visible, in its tub, alongside the conning tower. They were to have been replaced by quadruple 1.1-inch machine cannon. The existing 5in/25 battery was provided with splinter protection.
At this time, too, the four 36-inch searchlights were relocated from the funnel to the mainmast, and the 0.50 caliber machine guns formerly mounted on what became the searchlight platform were moved up into the "birdbath" at the masthead. Similar guns are visible on the foremast platform. The 24-inch searchlights on the signal bridge had to be relocated to clear the new 5-inch (Mark 19) director support.
USN photo courtesy of Gerald Forman, Oklahoma Association.
Text courtesy of U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
PDF submitted by Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-37 Oklahoma 2.41k Five page booklet of Oklahoma's (BB-37) general plans following her last rebuild at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, February 1941.
Information and inboard profile, Outboard profile and Superstructure Decks, Upper Deck, Main deck, 2nd Deck, 3rd deck, Splinter Deck, 1st platform, & Second Platform, Hold, and Inner Bottom.
Source: NARA II, College Park, Maryland.
PDF submitted by Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Attack on Pearl Harbor
Hit 399k Photograph taken from a Japanese plane during the torpedo attack on ships moored on both sides of Ford Island shortly after the beginning of the Pearl Harbor attack. View looks about east, with the supply depot, submarine base and fuel tank farm in the right center distance. A torpedo has just hit West Virginia (BB-48) on the far side of Ford Island (center). Other battleships moored nearby are (from left): Nevada (BB-36), Arizona (BB-39), Tennessee (BB-43) (inboard of West Virginia), Oklahoma (BB-37) (torpedoed and listing) alongside Maryland (BB-46), and California (BB-44). On the near side of Ford Island, to the left, are light cruisers Detroit (CL-8) and Raleigh (CL-7), target and training ship Utah (BB-31) and seaplane tender Tangier(AV-8). Raleigh and Utah have been torpedoed, and Utah is listing sharply to port. Japanese planes are visible in the right center (over Ford Island) and over the Navy Yard at right. U.S. Navy planes on the seaplane ramp are on fire. Japanese writing in the lower right states that the photograph was reproduced by authorization of the Navy Ministry. Text courtesy of wikipedia.com.
Official U.S. Navy photograph NH 50930.
BB-37 Oklahoma 3.42k The Oklahoma (BB-37) & West Virginia (BB-48) take their initial torpedo hits on 7 December. Photo courtesy of Arnold Putnam.
BB-37 Oklahoma 1.16k The Oklahoma (BB-37) & West Virginia (BB-48) take their initial torpedo hits on 7 December. Photo courtesy of Arnold Putnam.
Hit 1.01k Japanese post card of bombers over Pearl Harbor, 7 December 1941. Photo courtesy of Arnold Putnam.
Hit 3.24k Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor - Hickam Field. Photo courtesy of Arnold Putnam.
Hit 2.92k Japanese photo of Battleship Row during 7 December attack.
Note the oil spilling out from bomb & toroedo hits in the first few minutes. From left to right: Nevada (BB-36), Vestal (AR-4) (outboard), Arizona (BB-39), West Virginia (BB-48) (outboard), Tennessee (BB-43), Oklahoma (BB-37) (outboard), Maryland (BB-46), & Neosho (AO-23) forward.
Photo courtesy of Arnold Putnam.
BB-37 Oklahoma 86k Gouache on board painting by the artist Tom Freeman entitled Last Torpedo.
The Oklahoma (BB-37) starts to capsize. The ship had no watertight integrity, as all portholes and watertight doors were open for Captain's inspection when the Japanese attacked. Maryland (BB-46) is at left, and Tennessee (BB-43) is behind and to the left of the Oklahoma, and West Virginia (BB-48) is directly behind her and sinking.
Photo and partial text courtesy of oldgloryprints.com
Text I.d. courtesy of DR. John M. Deur.
BB-37 Oklahoma 290k Oklahoma (BB-37) rolls over in a four photo sequence as shown in the Pearl Harbor Damage Profile. USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen, Tom Kermen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-37 Oklahoma 742k The Oklahoma (BB-37) in mid capsize. USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-37 Oklahoma 515k Naval photograph documenting the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii which initiated US participation in World War II. Navy's caption: Keel of the capsized Oklahoma (BB-37) with the Maryland (BB-46) in the background during the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. Photo courtesy of National Archives at San Francisco (RW-SB).
ARC Identifier 295990, arcweb.archives.gov.
Item from Record Group 21: Records of District Courts of the United States, 1685 - 2004.
The Raid on Pearl Harbor63kOil on canvas painting by the artist Ivan Berryman entitled The Raid on Pearl Harbor, 7th December 1941, depicting the view across 'Battleship Row', viewed from above Ford Island as the Nevada (BB-36) gallantly makes her break for the open sea, coming under heavy attack from Japanese A6M2s from the carrier Hiryu. The Nevada was eventually too badly damaged to continue and was beached to avoid blocking the harbor entrance. In the immediate foreground, the lightly damaged Tennessee (BB-43) is trapped inboard of West Virginia (BB-48) which has sunk at her moorings, leaking burning oil and hampering the daring operations to pluck trapped crew members from her decks, while just visible to the right is the stern of the Maryland (BB-46) and the capsized Oklahoma (BB-37). Photo and partial text courtesy of military-art.com.
BB-44 California889kNeosho (AO-23), cautiously backs away from her berth (right center) in a successful effort to escape the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, 7 December 1941. At left the battleship California (BB-44) lists after aerial blows. Other crippled warships and part of the hull of the capsized Oklahoma (BB-37) may be seen in the background. USN photo, available from the United States Library of Congress's Prints and Photographs division under the digital ID fsa.8e01821, courtesy of Robert Hurst via Gary Priolo.
BB-44 California1.22kCalifornia (BB-44) left, being abanonded by her crew, Oklahoma (BB-37) (Center). The larger ship (at right) is St. Louis (CL-49) (note the twin 5"/38 mountings). Smaller one (in distance, between Oklahoma & St. Louis) is a single-stack destroyer.Photo i.d. courtesy of Chuck Haberlein.
Photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-46 Maryland36kOfficers' Motor Boats from either the Oklahoma (BB-37), or Argonne (AG-31) pass the capsized hull of Oklahoma. The Maryland (BB-46) is in the background.Official USN photo courtesy of USNI / USN.
BB-37 Oklahoma 86k The capsized hull of Oklahoma (BB-37), probably at the beginning of rescue efforts with a Officers' Motor Boat from the battleship in the foreground, probably on 8 December 1941. Photo courtesy of periscopefilm.com.
BB-37 Oklahoma 78k The capsized hull of Oklahoma (BB-37), with a barge alongside to support rescue efforts, probably on 8 December 1941. Maryland (BB-46) is at right, and California (BB-44) is in the center distance. Official USN photo # 80-G-32453, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-37 Oklahoma 99k Rescue teams at work on the capsized hull of Oklahoma (BB-37), seeking crew members trapped inside, 7 December 1941. The starboard bilge keel is visible at the top of the upturned hull. Officers' Motor Boats from Oklahoma and Argonne (AG-31) are in the foreground. Maryland (BB-46) is in the background. Official USN photo # 80-G-19941, now in the collections of the National Archives.
Salvage & Sinking
BB-48 806k Admiral Chester W. Nimitz presents awards on the flight deck of the carrier Enterprise (CV-6) moored at Pearl Harbor on 5/27/1942. Note the battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) (capsized, nearest to camera) & West Virginia (BB-48) & Arizona (BB-39) behind her.
One of those visible receiving a medal is Dorie Miller, an African-American messman who was awarded the Navy Cross for his heroic actions on board the battleship West Virginia (BB-48) during the Pearl Harbor attack.
Photo from the collection of Robert L. Lawson.
US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 1996.488.272.007.
Pearl Harbor106kPearl Harbor, Oahu, Territory of Hawaii view looking northward, with the Navy Yard industrial area in the foreground and the Marine Barracks in the lower right, 28 July 1942. Ford Island is at left, with Oklahoma (BB-37) and Arizona (BB-39) under salvage nearby. San Diego (CL-53) is in the upper center.
West Virginia (BB-48) is in Drydock Number One, in the lower left, and California (BB-44) is alongside the wharf at the extreme right. Cruisers alongside the pier in right center are Northampton (CA-26) (left) and Pensacola (CA-24). Submarines alongside 1010 Dock, just beyond Drydock # 1, are Trout (SS-202), Pollack (SS-180), Dolphin (SS-169) and Cachalot (SS-170). Note camouflage on many of the Navy Yard's buildings.
Official USN photo # NH 84002, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center. Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of The Honorable James V. Forrestal.
BB-37 Oklahoma 94k Under Secretary of the Navy James V. Forrestal (left)With Rear Admiral William R. Furlong (right), Commandant of the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard, and another officer, on board the capsized hull of Oklahoma (BB-37), at Pearl Harbor on 6 September 1942. The ship was then in the early stages of salvage. Note the two battleships in the background, moored alongside Ford Island. They are Pennsylvania (BB-38), in center, and either Maryland (BB-46) or Colorado (BB-45). USNHC Photograph # NH 83994.
BB-37 Oklahoma 87k 22 September 1942 photo of a diver preparing to enter the flooded overturned hull of the Oklahoma (BB-37). The hull compartments were isolated wherever possible in order to form a separate air bubble inside. Photo from the book "Resurrection-Salvaging the Battle Fleet at Pearl Harbor", by Dan Madsen, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 127k Oklahoma (BB-37) Pressure Chamber. Photo Source: NARA San Francisco, Pearl Harbor Navy Yard General Correspondence files 1941-45.
Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-37 Oklahoma 120k Oklahoma (BB-37) interior, starboard engine room. Photo taken 22 September 1942. Photo Source: NARA San Francisco, Pearl Harbor Navy Yard General Correspondence files 1941-45.
Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-37 Oklahoma 122k Oklahoma (BB-37) interior, looking into ship through bottom access hole. Photo taken 22 September 1942. Photo Source: NARA San Francisco, Pearl Harbor Navy Yard General Correspondence files 1941-45.
Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-37 Oklahoma 79k Oklahoma (BB-37) internal model for divers. Photo taken 23 September 1942. Photo # 5337-42. Photo Source: NARA San Francisco, Pearl Harbor Navy Yard General Correspondence files 1941-45.
Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-37 Oklahoma 136k 28 October 1942 photo showing the construction of the winch foundations on Ford Island. Photo from the book "Resurrection-Salvaging the Battle Fleet at Pearl Harbor", by Dan Madsen, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 129k Before refloating the Oklahoma (BB-37), a cofferdam was built from the quarterdeck break to just aft of turret #4 which increased the water plane of the ship. Officials hoped this and more cofferdams would allow the ship to be refloated, but the extensive port side torpedo damage, found after initial inspection dives, quickly dashed these hopes. This photo shows the beginning of the hull patching, similar to that done on the salvage of the West Virginia (BB-48). Photo from the book "Resurrection-Salvaging the Battle Fleet at Pearl Harbor", by Dan Madsen, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 415k Photographer works on the wreck of the Oklahoma (BB-37), January 1943. USN photo # 80-G-276601 courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-37 Oklahoma 127k 8 January 1943 photo of the crew of the crane barge Haviside installing the head-frames on the overturned hull of the Oklahoma (BB-37). Twenty one head-frames were installed, braced against the docking and centerline keel of the ship. Photo from the book "Resurrection-Salvaging the Battle Fleet at Pearl Harbor", by Dan Madsen, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 133k 13 February 1943 photo of the installation of 1-inch cables into the righting winches. Photo from the book "Resurrection-Salvaging the Battle Fleet at Pearl Harbor", by Dan Madsen, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 136k Righting operations are seen beginning on 8 March 1943. Twin drum winches were used to reel in the 1-inch cable running from fixed and moving tackles. The tackles were themselves connected to the Oklahoma (BB-37) by 3-inch cables which ran over the top of the head-frames to securing spots on the starboard side of the hull. Photo from the book "Resurrection-Salvaging the Battle Fleet at Pearl Harbor", by Dan Madsen, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 123k The capsized battleship is rotated upright, while under salvage at Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, on 8 March 1943. This view looks forward, with the ship in the 130 degree position. Her starboard deck edge is just rising from the water. USNHC # NH 63916.
BB-37 Oklahoma 107k 13 March 1943: Oklahoma (BB-37) salvage view from shore during night work reinforcement pendant connections at head casting. Ship in 129-30 position. Photo # 5337-42. Photo Source: NARA Record Group 181: Records of Naval Districts and Shore Establishments, 1784 - 2000
Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-37 Oklahoma 386k Salvage of Oklahoma (BB-37) , as seen on 19 March 1943. This view is from offshore, with the ship in about a 70 degree position. Source: Official U.S.N Photo, Navy Department Pearl Harbor, Photo No.1599-43 courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 85k Oklahoma (BB-37) being righted after having capsized during Pearl Harbor attack....cables were attached to Ford Island and she was rolled upright in 1943. USN photo.
BB-37 429k Bow view of salvage operation on the Oklahoma (BB-37), as seen on 22 March 1943. Source: U.S. Navy, Hawaiian War Records Depository Photo No. Hwrd2212, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 317k Ship righted to about 30 degrees, on 29 March 1943, while she was under salvage at Pearl Harbor. She had capsized and sunk during the 7 December 1941 Japanese air raid. Naval Air Station Ford Island is in the background. Official USN photo # 80-G-410533, now in the collections of the National Archives via Bill Gonyo.
BB-37 Oklahoma 1.40k Nearly righted. USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-37 Oklahoma 65k Battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) taken after her righting 29 March 1943. USN photo.
BB-37 Oklahoma 99k 31 March 1943 photo showing the Oklahoma (BB-37) with head-frames removed and the 3-inch cables attached directly to turret barbettes and kingposts for the final righting of the ship. The individuals in the photo are Pacific Bridge's Jack Graham, Adm. William Furlong (Pearl Harbor Navy Yard Commandant) and Capt. Francis Whitaker (Supt. of Salvage). Photo from the book "Resurrection-Salvaging the Battle Fleet at Pearl Harbor", by Dan Madsen, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 112k 6 April 1943 showing the progress made in righting the Oklahoma (BB-37). Identified individuals are Lt. Cdr. Solomon Isquith (Commanding Officer of vessels in-ordinary) pulling himself up the sloping deck, Capt. Francis Whitaker (Supt. of Salvage) smiling in the background and one civilian, Assistant Secretary of the Navy Ralph Bard. Photo from the book "Resurrection-Salvaging the Battle Fleet at Pearl Harbor", by Dan Madsen, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 161k 6 May 1943 photo taken on board the Oklahoma (BB-37), looking aft showing her quarterdeck and rear turrets. A good photo showing the still attached cables around both turret barbettes. In the background, the above water remains of the Arizona are all but gone. Photo from the book "Resurrection-Salvaging the Battle Fleet at Pearl Harbor", by Dan Madsen, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 171k Listing at a 40 degree position, the Oklahoma's (BB-37) bridge structure is seen. USN photo from the WARSHIP SERIES #7--"PARALLEL FATES--The Utah (BB-31/AG-16) and the Oklahoma (BB-37) in Peace and in War", by Harvey M. Beigel, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 128k 18 June 1943 starboard bow view of the Oklahoma (BB-37). The ship is nearly completely righted with only a ~2 degree list. Oil sheens are seen coming out from many areas of the shattered hull. USN photo from the WARSHIP SERIES #7--"PARALLEL FATES--The Utah (BB-31/AG-16) and the Oklahoma (BB-37) in Peace and in War", by Harvey M. Beigel, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 90k Salvage of Oklahoma (BB-37), 1942-44. Lifting section # 1 of the five-section main cofferdam patch used to seal the ship's port side amidships, from frames 43 to 75. Stevedore barge YS-109 is in the left center background. Official USN photo # NH 64493, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-37 Oklahoma 155k 21 August 1943 photo shows the heavily reinforced main patch on the Oklahoma's (BB-37) port side. The forms in the foreground contained tremie concrete and this sealed the ends of the patch. Photo from the book "Resurrection-Salvaging the Battle Fleet at Pearl Harbor", by Dan Madsen, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 73k This photo, just released by the U.S. Navy, shows the battleship Oklahoma being raised from the bottom of Pearl Harbor, where the warship was sunk during the Jap attack. Giant timber frames erected along the hull have cables running over them and to winches ashore, which slowly draw the vessel upright. USN photo from ACME dated 21 September 1943 from its New York Bureau via the MacArthur Museum of Arkansas Military History, courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
BB-37 Oklahoma 130k Preparing the ship for refloating, after she had been righted. Photographed on 20 September 1943, looking forward from off the port side. Note large cofferdam patch installed from frames 43 to 75 to seal the extensive torpedo damage in that area. The patch was 130 feet long and 57˝ feet high. Righting cables are still in place between the ship and Ford Island. Official USN photo # NH 64495, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-37 Oklahoma 148k Aerial view from off the port side, 6 November 1943, after the ship had been refloated. Note the large cofferdam patch installed from frames 43 to 75 to seal the extensive torpedo damage in that area, and cofferdams built around the main deck edge by the after turrets to increase the waterplane area and improve stability during the refloating process. Official USN photo # NH 64496, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-37 Oklahoma 149k Hose adjustment, 12 November 1943. Photo Source: NARA San Francisco, Pearl Harbor Navy Yard General Correspondence files 1941-45.
Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-37 358k Oklahoma (BB-37) with pumps and pontoons keeping her afloat, is pushed and towed into drydock on 28 December 1943. Source: U.S. Navy, Hawaiian War Records Depository Photo No. Hwrd2211, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 148k View from off the port side, 24 December 1943, more than a month and a half after refloating and four days before the ship entered drydock. Official USN photo # NH 64497, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-37 Oklahoma 94k Oklahoma (BB-37) after being refloated from the bottom of Pearl Harbor. In order to aide in refloating Oklahoma, everything above the main deck was removed in order to lighten her. USN photo.
BB-37 Oklahoma 74k Stern view of the Oklahoma (BB-37) after being refloated from the bottom of Pearl Harbor. Photo Photo from the book Parallel Fates, written by Harvey M. Beigel, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 935k Stern view of the Oklahoma (BB-37) being eased into dry dock on 28 December 1943. The slight list to starboard was intentional to help offset the damaged port side. Source: Official U.S.N Photo, Navy Department Pearl Harbor, Photo No.6986-43 courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-37 Oklahoma 146k The Oklahoma (BB-37) is seen entering Dry Dock #4 on 28 December 1943, two years and three weeks after being sunk. The ship reached the dry dock after a slow, precarious tow around Hospital Point and there was a general sense of relief when she entered the safe confines of the dry dock. Text from the book "Resurrection-Salvaging the Battle Fleet at Pearl Harbor", by Dan Madsen.
Photo Source: NARA San Francisco, Pearl Harbor Navy Yard General Correspondence files 1941-45.
Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-37 Oklahoma 73k The Oklahoma (BB-37) at Dry Dock #4 on 28 December 1943, two years and three weeks after being sunk. National Archives photo courtesy of USNI.
BB-37 Oklahoma 115k In Drydock Number Two at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard, 1 January 1944, after removal of patches. This view looks aft from about Frame 35 and shows the extensive torpedo damage to her port side. Note displaced armor plate sections, with some missing. Debris on the drydock floor is mainly concrete used to seal the patches. Official USN photo # NH 63917, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-37 Oklahoma 1.40k In Drydock Number Two at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard. USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-37 Oklahoma 106k Pencil plan of the ship's midships section, showing arrangements for ballasting and refloating. Probably drawn at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard in late 1943 or early 1944, after the ship had been drydocked. Official USN photo # NH 92097, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.
BB-64 Wisconsin374k Wisconsin (BB-64) tied up alongside the Oklahoma (BB-37) at Pearl Harbor. The size of the Iowa class (BB-61 / 66) can be readily seen when compared with the earlier classes. The Oklahoma is over 300 feet smaller and 18,000 tons lighter than the Wisconsin, which seems to dwarf her, 11 November 1944.
Note the single and double barreled 5 inch guns lying on shore off the Oklahoma's starboard bow and the absence of her superstructure.
USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-37 Oklahoma 1.40k Oklahoma (BB-37) Is Headed for the Scrap Pile
Bremerton Sun photo dated 22 January 1947. Oklahoma, the first battleship to sink when the Japanee attacked Pearl Harbor, nears the end of her days at a Pearl Harbor dock where workers prepare her for a tow to the west coast and scrapping by the Moore Drydock Company at Oakland California.
Bremerton Sun photo submitted by Joe MacDonald.
BB-37 Oklahoma 185k Oklahoma (BB-37) appears here sometime before being towed off to the west coast and her appointment with the bottom of the Pacific ocean on 17 May 1947, 540 miles out, bound from Pearl Harbor to San Francisco. Photo submitted by Joe MacDonald.
BB-37 Oklahoma 8k "We were some 500 miles at sea when we turned around and headed back. I would say we had returned 100 miles or so when toward the end of my 6-to-midnight watch 17 May. I saw her unaccountably straighten up. Then suddenly I was aware we were going astern and gaining speed. Behind us the lights of the Oklahoma (BB-37) disappeared...I made a dash for the stern, reaching it just in time to see the end of our...towing wire slip through the guides in a shower of sparks." Captain George O. Anderson,CO of tugboat Monarch. USN photo submitted by Kevin King, courtesy of ussoklahoma.com
BB-37 Oklahoma 91k Oklahoma (BB-37) Association patch commemorating the Association's 1973 twin reunions at Anaheim, California, and Newport, Rhode Island. Colors & symbolism: Background - Gray - for the smoke of the attack; Maryland (BB-46) (background ship) - Pearl Gray for Pearl Harbor; Border rings and upper inscriptions - Scarlet - Oklahoma colors were scarlet & white; Blue - Waters of Pearl Harbor and lower inscription; Brown - bottom of the capsized Oklahoma; Oil on the water - Black - for the infamous deed; White caps on the water - White. "32 came back" was the theme of the reunions, commemorating the trapped crewmen rescued from inside the capsized battleship. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph. Donation of Gerald E. Foreman, 1975.
(NISMF)376kA guest studies a painting depicting the history of battleships. The artwork was painted by George Skybeck and presented to the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association during their annual banquet at Honolulu, Hawaii, on 8 December 1991. USN photo # DN-SC-92-05391, by PHC Carolyn Harris, from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection, courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil.
World War II Memorial371k A quote made by Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz is inscribed on a granite wall at the National World War II Memorial located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Fleet Adm. Nimitz was the United States signatory to the surrender terms aboard the battleship Missouri (BB-63) in Tokyo Bay, Japan on 2 September 1945, thus ending World War II. Established by the American Battle Monuments Commission, the memorial honors all military veterans of World War II, the citizens on the home front, the nation at large, and the high moral purpose and idealism that motivated the nation's call to arms. On 29 May 2004, the memorial was formally dedicated with an estimated 200,000 people expected to attend, and includes 100,000 visiting veterans of all wars. USN photo # N-0295M-011 by Photographer’s Mate 2nd Class Daniel J. McLain, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
BB-37 Oklahoma 205k Pearl Harbor survivor and former crew member of Oklahoma (BB-37), Paul Goodyear reads the name of former shipmates lost on Oklahoma during a joint Oklahoma Memorial Committee/National Park Service dedication ceremony for the newly constructed memorial on historic Ford Island, 7 December 2007. According to the memorial's architect, Don Beck, the memorial portrays Sailors manning the rails, or rendering honors to a naval vessel as their own vessel passes.
Behind Mr. Goodyear is Dick Artley, one of the 32 trapped crewmen rescued from inside the capsized battleship during the days right after the attack.
USN photo # N-3283M-039 by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Sarah Murphy, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
BB-37 Oklahoma 83k The Honorable Brad Henry, Governor of Oklahoma, delivers his remarks during a joint Oklahoma Memorial Committee/National Park Service dedication ceremony for battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) on historic Ford Island. The memorial honors the 429 Sailors and Marines aboard who lost their lives after being hit by five torpedoes and capsizing at Pearl Harbor on 7 December 1941. USN photo # N-4965F-027 by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class James E. Foehl, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
BB-37 Oklahoma 301k Commander, U.S. Pacific Command, Adm. Timothy J. Keating and his wife, pose for a photo after attending a joint Oklahoma Memorial Committee/National Park Service dedication ceremony for battleship Oklahoma (BB-37) on historic Ford Island. 2,408 U.S. Flags were placed in commemoration of those who gave their lives on that historic day in 1941. This year marks the 66th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor. USN photo # N-8623G-214 by Mass Communications Specialist 2nd Class Elisia V. Gonzales, courtesy of news.navy.mil.

USS OKLAHOMA BB-37 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry
(Located On The Hazegray & Underway Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)

Crew Contact And Reunion Information

Contact Name: Mr. PAUL GOODYEAR
Address:1138 AVE OF COTTON CASA GRANDE AZ 85222
Phone: 520 421 0055
E-mail: PAUL GOODYEAR


Note About Contacts.

The contact listed, Was the contact at the time for this ship when located. If another person now is the contact, E-mail me and I will update this entry. These contacts are compiled from various sources over a long period of time and may or may not be correct. Every effort has been made to list the newest contact if more than one contact was found.


Additional Resources
Hazegray & Underway Battleship Pages By Andrew Toppan.
ussoklahoma.com

Back To The Main Photo Index Back To The Battleship Photo Index Page

This page is created and maintained by Michael Mohl
All Pages © 1996 - 2015, by Paul R. Yarnall NavSource Naval History. All Rights Reserved.