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NavSource Online: Battleship Photo Archive

BB-40 USS NEW MEXICO

Radio Call Sign: November - Echo - Victor - November


New Mexico Class Battleship: Displacement 32,000 Tons, Dimensions, 624' (oa) x 97' 5" x 31' 1" (Max). Armament 12 x 14"/50 22 x 5"/51, 8 x 3"/50 2 x 21" tt. Armor, 13 1/2" Belt, 18" Turrets, 3 1/2" +2" Decks, 16" Conning Tower. Machinery, 27,500 SHP; G.E. Geared Turbines with electric drive, 4 screws. Speed, 21 Knots, Crew 1084.

Operational and Building Data: Laid down by New York Navy Yard, October 14, 1915. Launched April 23, 1917. Commissioned May 18, 1918. Decommissioned July 19, 1946. Stricken February 25, 1947.
Fate: Sold November 9, 1947 and broken up for scrap in New York.
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Keel Laying / Commissioning
1915 - 1918

BB-40 New Mexico821kThe First Electric Battleship
Uncle Sam Plans A Surprise for the Naval World In the Construction of the First and Only Electric Battleship - The New California To Be Propelled and Operated Solely By Electricity
One of the New 14 Inch Guns for the California
Image and text provided by University of Vermont.
Photo & text by Burlington Weekly Free Press. (Burlington, Vt.) 1866-1928, 28 January 1915, Image 10, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico962kThe United States new superdreadnought California whose keel will be laid at the New York Navy Yard in the near future, will be the first electrically driven dreadnought in the world.
New Mexico (BB-40) Will Be Only Battleship in World to Use This Power
Serious Problem of Launching the Monster Seafighter Pennsylvania (BB-38).
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo & text by The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, 21 March 1915, FOURTH SECTION PICTORIAL SECTION, Image 49, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Guns 592k Secretary of the Navy Joseph Daniel and other dignitaries attending the keel laying of the then named battleship California on 14 October 1915. The ship, renamed New Mexico (BB-40) was the lead ship in this class of battleships. Source: Library of Congress, Photo No. LC-B2-3633-4. via Mike Green.
Guns 845k Brooklyn Navy Yard workers celebrating the keel laying of the then named battleship California on 14 October 1915. Source: Library of Congress, Photo No. LC-B2-3633-5 via Mike Green.
BB-40 New Mexico693kNO OTHER NAVY WILL HAVE SHIP LIKE CALIFORNIA WHEN SHE IS COMPLETED
The keel of the superDreadnought California, destined to be the greatest of battleships, was laid at the navy yard in Brooklyn. The event was an epoch in naval construction, and among those who participated were Secretary of the Navy Daniels, Rear Admiral Nathaniel R. Usher, commandant of the great yard in which the California will be rushed to completion; Rear Admiral Robert S. Griffin, the engineer in chief of the navy, and Rear Admiral David W.Taylor, chief of the bureau of construction in Washington.
Her name would be changed before her commissioning to New Mexico (BB-40).
Text i.d. courtesy of Mike Green.
Photo by American Press Association.
Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH. & University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo from The Democratic Banner. (Mt. Vernon, Ohio) 1898-192?, 19 October 1915, Image 1 & The Broad Ax.(Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, 30 October 1915, Image 2, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico3.92kElectricity to Make Our Latest Battleship Mightiest In World
In the presence of a great throng the keel of the oil-burning turbine engine battleship California was laid with impressive ceremonies at the Brooklyn navy yard.
Photo by Underwood and Underwood.
Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA.
Photo from The Tacoma Times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, 01 November 1915, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico1.07kMightiest of All Fighting Ships
Our New Big Battleship California and Why It Is Different from Any Other War Vessel Ever Designed
Out ot Sight Below the Ocean Horizon the California Could Destroy New York City in Half an Hour with Long-Range Shells Which Would Seem to Drop From the Sky.
One Broadside from All the "California" Guns Would Be Equal to Throwing Six Touring Cars from Sandy Hook to New York.
Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA.
Photo by Richmond Times-Dispatch. (Richmond, Va.) 1914-current, 07 November 1915, Image 55, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico451kTHE NEW BATTLESHIP NEW MEXICO (BB-40).
This is a picture of the model for the new battleship New Mexico. It will be the greatest Dreadnought afloat when completed. Its sister ships will be the Mississippi (BB-41) and Idaho (BB-42).
Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX.
Photo from El Paso Herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, 07 April 1916, HOME EDITION, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico713kMIGHTY ENGINES FOR OUR NEWEST WARSHIPS
THE CALIFORNIA - NOT YET IN SERVICE - HAS TURBO ELECTRIC DRIVE
Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE.
Photo & text by The Red Cloud Chief. (Red Cloud, Webster Co., Neb.) 1873-1923, 12 October 1916, Image 6, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Guns 1.10k "U.S. Navy Yard, Washington. Sight shop, big gun section. 1917: Possible future armament for the New Mexico (BB-40 /42) class . Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative, Library of Congress Photo courtesy of shorpy.com.
BB-40 New Mexico 3.16k "Misses Margaret C. DeBaca Virginia Carr, sponsors for the new dreadnought & members of the launching party which came from New Mexico for the ceremony."
"Launching at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on last Monday of the U.S. super-dreadnought New Mexico (BB-40), newest, and with her sister ships the largest and most powerful vessels in the Navy, and the world's first dreadnought to be driven by electric power."
Times Photo Service, text courtesy of N.Y. Times 29 April 1917, Page 1, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico950kNEW U. S. SUPERDREADNOUGHT LEAVING THE WAYS
New Mexico (BB-40), Nation's Greatest Battleship, Takes the Water.

Navy Yard Closely Guarded for Launching, Witnessed by Only 300 Guests. Huge Oil Burning Super-dreadnought Is First To Be Electrically Driven.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 April 1917, Image 3, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico1.93k"Hit First and Hit Hard" U. S. Navy Rule; Here's How Uncle Sam's Gunners Turn Trick
Photo shows range finder to be put on Uncle Sam's newest superDreadnought, the New Mexico (BB-40); diagram shows how a big gun is fired.
Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota.
Photo & text by The Bismarck Tribune. (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, 09 May 1917, Image 8, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 331k Main battery drawn out as construction continues on the New Mexico (BB-40), 6 October 1917. Brooklyn Navy Yard Archive - courtesy National Archive and Records Administration, Northeast Region - NYC, Record Group 181 via flickr.com.
BB-40 New Mexico 610k Port forward quarter of the New Mexico (BB-40), 6 October 1917. Photo No. f1060n14, Brooklyn Navy Yard Archive - courtesy National Archive and Records Administration, Northeast Region - NYC, Record Group 181 via flickr.com.
BB-40 New Mexico 623k New Mexico (BB-40) in Dry Dock #4, Bow view, January 1918 Photo No. N3480, Brooklyn Navy Yard Archive - courtesy National Archive and Records Administration, Northeast Region - NYC, Record Group 181 via flickr.com.
BB-40 New Mexico 1.4m New Mexico (BB-40) in Dry Dock #4, portside looking aft, January 1918 Photo No. N3478, Brooklyn Navy Yard Archive - courtesy National Archive and Records Administration, Northeast Region - NYC, Record Group 181 via flickr.com.
BB-40 New Mexico 577k New Mexico (BB-40) starboard view, shortly after commissioning, May 1918. Courtesy of Seaman 2nd Class Ralph D Gummerson via Al Gummerson & Tom Bateman & Philip H. Robare RMCS, USN - RET.
BB-40 New Mexico 105k Capt. Ashley Herman Robertson was the Commanding Officer of the New Mexico (BB-40) from May 1918 to September 1918. Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
1919 - 1933
Almost Unknown280kDaniels Tells Congressmen of Battleship New Mexico's (BB-40) Remarkable Accomplishments Image and text provided by University of New Mexico.
Photo from The Evening Herald. (Albuquerque, N.M.) 1914-1922, 02 January 1919, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Almost Unknown375kParticularly interesting to sightseers were the two latest dreadnoughts added to the navy, the Mississippi (BB-41) and the New Mexico (BB-40), the latter of which is shown here. Both ships are 32,000 tons. Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, 05 January 1919, Section 3 Pictorial Magazine, Image 31, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 108k After initial training, New Mexico (BB-40) departed New York 15 January 1919 for Brest, France, to escort home transport George Washington (ID-3018) carrying President Woodrow Wilson from the Versailles Peace Conference, returning to Hampton Roads 27 February. Photo taken from U.S. Warships of World War One, by P.H. Silverstone. Text courtesy of DANFS. Photo contributed by Robert Hurst.
Almost Unknown330kONE OF OUR GREATEST BATTLESHIPS AT ANCHOR Image and text provided by University of New Mexico.
Photo from Carrizozo News. (Carrizozo, N.M.) 1908-192?, 28 February 1919, Image 2, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 129k Photographed from an airplane, while steaming in line with other battleships, 13 April 1919. Note S.E.5A airplane atop the flying-off platform atop the battleship's second turret. Official USN photo USNHC # NH 59949, now in the collections of the National Archives.
New York Harbor1.78k"American dreadnoughts & super-dreadnoughts steaming into New York harbor 14 April 1919."
The Texas (BB-35) leads the procession with a airplane on her turret catapult. Note the escorting biplane.
The "escorting" aircraft is either a Curtiss HS-1 or HS-2 (note the single engine) can't tell which from the photo. The aircraft on a fly-off platform atop the No. 2 turret of the Texas is 1 of 6 Sopwith Camels purchased from Britain at the end of the war.
The platforms were a British concept designed to provide the fleet with an aircraft capable of reaching the high flying Zeppelins which the German Navy occasionally used as scouts. The Texas was the only US Battleship to be fitted with turret fly-off platforms while in Europe and was the test bed for this program in the US Navy. Not visible in this view is a stripped down (No fabric and no wings) Sopwith 1-1/2 Strutter lashed atop the No. 3 Turret. The platforms were eventually mounted on all 14" gun BB's through the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class (with mixed reviews from their commanders) and carried either a Hanriot HD-1 or a Neiuport 28. Though equipped inflatable floats for water landings, this tended to do a lot of damage not the least of which was dowsing a hot engine in cold salt water. By 1920 a successful compressed air catapult was developed and were being mounted on the aft deck of all 4 turreted battleships and fly-off platforms were removed. The Texas and New York (BB-34), because of their 5 Turrets, lacked the deck space for the catapult and had to make do with a float plane (Vought VE-7) sitting on the aft deck which would be launched by lowering it over the side for a surface take-off.
If you look carefully at the photo you see the VE-7 on the deck and the A-frame hoist used for handling it.
Photo by Paul Thompson.
Text courtesy of N.Y. Times, page 481, from The War of the Nations (New York), 31 December 1919, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
Atlantic  Fleet975kHow the Atlantic Fleet looked to the camera man in a seaplane flying over lower Manhattan a week ago yesterday morning as the mighty armada came up the bay to anchorage in the Hudson off Riverside Drive for a two weeks' vacation after months of strenuous maneuvers in Southern waters. The destroyers Dale (DD-290) and Flusser (DD-289) are shown leading the column of eight dreadnoughts: Oklahoma (BB-37), Nevada (BB-36), Arizona (BB-39), flagship Pennsylvania (BB-38), Utah (BB-31), Florida (BB-30), North Dakota (BB-29) and Delaware (BB-28) past the Statue of Liberty at a fifteen-knot clip. In addition to the big battleships, the fleet includes thirty-two destroyers, numerous supply ships and several submarines.
The Atlantic battleship fleet is home: again. Here are the twelve great first line fighting ships that are paying Father Knickerbocker a two weeks' visit. Over a hundred of Uncle Sam's grim sea warriors gray the North River, while their 30,000 sailor-men are given the freedom of the city in a royal welcome home.
The Battleship Mississippi (BB-41) leading the fleet into the harbor, as photographed from an airplane. Note the airplanes atop the forward and aft turrets.
Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 20 April 1919, Image 48, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico333kMADGE KENNEDY, MOVIE STAR, IS SPONSOR FOR BATTLESHIP NEW MEXICO (BB-40) IN LOAN DRIVE Image and text provided by University of New Mexico.
Photo & text by The Evening Herald. (Albuquerque, N.M.) 1914-1922, 30 April 1919, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico1302kOur Hundred Per Cent Navy Leviathan. Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
PDF courtesy of New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 01 June 1919, Image 83 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 50k The magnificent sweep of her clipper bow is revealed by a spell in dry dock at the New York Navy Yard in the summer of 1919. Photo taken from Jane's Battleships of the 20th Century, by Bernard Ireland, & contributed by Robert Hurst.
Almost Unknown2.44kPACIFIC FLEET NOW EQUAL IF NOT SUPERIOR TO WHOLE JAPANESE NAVY
Aboard New Mexico (BB-40), Friday, July 25, by Associated Press.
Four dreadnoughts of the Pacific fleet, the New Mexico, Arkansas (BB-33), Texas (BB-35) and New York (BB-34) were lifted successfully through Gatun lock today. This was the first attempt to negotiate the waterway with a fleet of dreadnoughts and tonight the warships lie anchored in fresh water at Gatun lake, 85 feet above sea level. The dreadnoughts will resume their trip toward the Pacific ocean Saturday at which time the Mississippi (BB-41) and the Wyoming (BB-32), both now coaling and oiling at Colon will attempt the passage of the canal. Twenty destroyers went through the canal Thursday passing through the locks in groups of ten. Captain Twining, chief of staff said that the canal had proved its naval value beyond a doubt as dread­naughts may be easily moved from the Atlantic to the Pacific with celerity and without trouble as shown by today's operations. The Pacific fleet will leave Panama for San Diego, Calif. Sunday night.
Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota.
Photo from The Bismarck Tribune. (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, 26 July 1919, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico900kAboard the New Mexico (BB-40), the first electric ship. Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
PDF courtesy of New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 07 September 1919, Image 71, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
New Mexico 86k Halftone reproduction of a photograph of the New Mexico's (BB-40) officers' Ward Room, with the table set for a meal, 1919. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105048. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
New Mexico 86k Halftone reproduction of a photograph of crew members exercising with her Number Four 5"/51 broadside gun, 1919. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105049. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
New Mexico 81k Halftone reproduction of a photograph of crew members reading and writing in the ship's reception room, 1919. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105050. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
New Mexico 82k Halftone reproduction of a photograph taken in the ship's surgical operating room, 1919. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105051. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
New Mexico 64k Halftone reproduction of a photograph taken in the ship's galley, 1919. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105052. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
New Mexico 64k Halftone reproduction of a photograph showing crew-members scrubbing clothes on the ship's forecastle, 1919. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105053. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
New Mexico 89k Halftone reproduction of a photograph of a band concert held on the ship's quarterdeck, 1919. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105054. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
New Mexico 81k Halftone reproduction of a photograph taken on the ship's fore deck, looking aft on the port side, 1919. Note life rafts attached to turret sides (and one suspended from the forward turret's rangefinder). The text provided on the original print is incorrect. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105055. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
New Mexico 81k Halftone reproduction of a photograph of crew members on the ship's fore deck, with her two forward 14-inch triple gun turrets behind them, 1919. The text provided on the original print is incorrect. The view actually looks aft on the port side, from a position near the anchor capstans. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105056. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
BB-40 New Mexico 289k The New Mexico (BB-40) on 16 July 1919 became flagship of the newly-organized Pacific Fleet, and three days later sailed for the Panama Canal and San Pedro, Calif., arriving 9 August. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-40 New Mexico 134k New Mexico (BB-40) traverses the Culebra Cut, Panama Canal, 25 July 1919. USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo by The Evening World. (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, 26 July 1919, Final Edition, Image 1, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 89k New Mexico (BB-40) in the middle west chamber, Gatun Locks, Panama Canal, 25 July 1919. Official USN photo USNHC # NH 75719, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico 296k Deck view from the New Mexico (BB-40) in the Panama Canal, 1919. Associated Press photo courtesy of San Francisco Examiner via David S. Smith.
BB-40 New Mexico 3.89k "America's first great Pacific Fleet on its historic journey by way of the Panama Canal to San Francisco where it is to be reviewed by President Wilson in the middle of this month. Leaving Hampton Roads in a majestic procession. Admiral Rodman's flagship, the dreadnought New Mexico (BB-40), appearing in the foreground." Photo by Underwood & Underwood, & text courtesy of N.Y. Times, 3 August 1919, Page 5, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas3.90kGiant Dreadnoughts of the New Pacific Fleet through Panama Canal.
The Texas (BB-35) transiting through Gatun Locks on 25 July 1919.
Pictured also are the New Mexico (BB-40), New York (BB-34) & Arkansas (BB-33).
Photo by Times Wide World Service, & text courtesy of N.Y. Times, 17 August 1919, Page 2, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 339k New Mexico (BB-40) and Wyoming (BB-32) passing through Miraflores lock, 8 August 1919. Associated Press text & photo courtesy of San Francisco Examiner via David S. Smith.
BB-40 New Mexico 1.60k Wyoming (BB-32) and the stern of the New Mexico (BB-40) passing through Gatun lock, 8 August 1919. USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
BB-40 New Mexico 257k US Navy Fleet In Panama Canal; (Visit of Panama President, standing, wearing a gray suit and standing on the gangway platform)in Panama Canal aboard the New Mexico (BB-40), 26 July 1919. Associated Press text & photo courtesy of San Francisco Examiner via David S. Smith.
BB-40 New Mexico 201k At the main-truck of the electric marvel floats the four star flag of Admiral Rodman, C & C of the U.S. Pacific Fleet. Associated Press text & photo courtesy of San Francisco Examiner via David S. Smith.
BB-40 New Mexico727kNaval Chief Visits Pacific Fleet.
SECRETARY OP THE NAVY DANIELS boarding the New Mexico (BB-40), flagship of the huge new Pacific fleet, upon its arrival at San Diego, Calif., after successfully passing through the Panama Canal.
Photo by Underwood & Underwood.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 14 August 1919, Final, Image 24, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 789k Looking forward from the aft fighting top of the New Mexico, the flagship of the Pacific Fleet, showing a part of the modern dreadnought's complicated equipment. The ship's garbage incinerator (to the right of the stack) is a novel piece of deck equipment. Times World Wide Photo, text courtesy of N.Y. Times 24 August 1919, Page 6, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Insert Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 August 1919, Image 45, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 51k Twin Billing:
"The Super-dreadnought New Mexico (BB-40), Admiral Rodman's flagship of the new Pacific Fleet, firing the salute of nineteen guns in honor of Secretary Daniels at the first review of the Fleet in Pacific waters."
Secretary of the Navy Daniels and Admiral Rodman, commander of the Pacific Fleet, receiving citizens of San Diego on board the flagship New Mexico.
Times World Wide Photo. Text courtesy of N.Y. Times 24 August 1919, Page 6, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Insert Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 August 1919, Image 46, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico899k Aboard the New Mexico (BB-40), the First Electric Ship
.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 07 September 1919, Image 71, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico643kADMIRAL HUGH RODMAN'S MIGHTY PACIFIC ARMADA REACHES ITS HOME "WATERS"
Four of our new Pacific Fleet's six dreadnoughts on their way up the California coast to San Diego. That city witnessed the greatest naval pageant in its' history when the fleet of nearly 200 ships ended its 5,000-rnile cruise in the harbor. Secretary of the Navy Daniels was the reviewing officer.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 August 1919, Image 43, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 19k "President Wilson, Secretary of the Navy Daniels and others of the reviewing party stand with bare heads while..." Times Wide World Photo Service, text courtesy of N.Y. Times 28 September 1919, Page 7, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 51k ...The super-dreadnought New Mexico (BB-40), flagship of the Pacific Fleet, steamed past with the band playing The Star Spangled Banner.
The new American Pacific Fleet, first great dreadnought squadron on the Pacific coast, making it's historic entry into Seattle Harbor for its first review by the President of the United States."
Times Wide World Photo Service, text courtesy of N.Y. Times 28 September 1919, Page 7, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico648k Three of the four giant propellers that drive the oil-burning New Mexico (BB-40), flagship of the Pacific Fleet, and the first electrically driven battleship in the world. Each propeller is driven by an 8.000 h. p. electric motor. Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 28 September 1919, Page 6, Image 58, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
New Mexico class 157k September 1919. Admiral Hugh Rodman (on the left) Commander, Battleship Division 9, Pacific Fleet, on the Bridge of the New Mexico (BB-40) consulting with her commanding officer Captain Arthur Lee Willard. Image from the Bancroft Library. University of California, Berkeley, courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
BB-40 New Mexico 701k Crew of the New Mexico (BB-40) posed on deck, on large guns. Photo inscription is Long Beach, California. Photo # J239186 U.S. Copyright Office. Digital ID: cph 3c08389 Source: Library of Congress, by C.E. Waterman, Long Beach, Calif. Photo courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
BB-40 New Mexico 2.57k Port side beam of the New Mexico (BB-40) taken at Balboa, the Pacific entrance to the Panama Canal. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-40 New Mexico 210k Two officers gigs and a lighter are moored alongside the New Mexico (BB-40), circa 1919, in San Francisco Bay. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-40 New Mexico 70k Sailor tightens an oil refueling coupling on board, circa 1919. The original caption reads: "Coaling ship holds no terrors for the gobs on the New Mexico (BB-40) as on our latest oil burning types of super dreadnought all that is necessary is to connect the hose and turn on the valve." Official USN photo USNHC # NH 45320, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico50kCaptain Arthur Lee Willard was the commanding officer of the battleship New Mexico (BB-40) from 1919 to 1921. Renewed problems with naval armaments saw Willard assigned as Special Aide for Navy Yards to the Secretary of the Navy in 1921. In this capacity he was in charge of all U.S. Navy industrial plants and shipbuilding on the eastern U.S. coast. In 1930, now holding the rank of Vice Admiral, Willard was assigned as commander of a series of U.S. fleet exercises that validated the increasing importance of aircraft carriers and attacks launched from beyond battleship gun range. These fleet exercises also inspired the creation of a two-ocean Navy in the 1930s by the Roosevelt administration. In 1932 Vice Admiral Willard was chosen to command the Fifth Naval District, a post which he held until retirement shortly before his death on 7 April 1935. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery. Willard Park, located at Washington Navy Yard, is named in his honor. Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
BB-40 New Mexico498kHoisting a Barge Aboard the New Mexico (BB-40).Photo by American Press Association.
Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo from The Ogden Standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, 12 December 1919, LAST EDITION - 4 P.M., Image 12, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 3.49k "The dreadnought New Mexico (BB-40), flagship of the newly created Pacific Fleet, entering the Golden Gate, San Francisco, in a pathway of equally golden sunlight, as seen from a Navy seaplane in flight nearly a thousand feet above." U.S. Navy official Photo, from Kadel & Herbert, text courtesy of N.Y. Times 21 December 1919, Page 7, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico638kThe Electric Ship, New Mexico (BB-40), from a painting by Walter L. Greene. Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 18 January 1920, page 4, Image 52, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico333kThe New Mexico (BB-40) from the Air
The New Mexico, Pride of the Pacific
Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ.
Photo & text by The Coconino Sun. (Flagstaff, Ariz.) 1898-1978, 12 March 1920, Image 14, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico488kU.S. NAVY
Jack's Reading Room
The men's quarters on our new battleships are more luxurious than the Admiral's quarters of fifty years ago. This is a corner in the reading room of the New Mexico (BB-40). A big library and complete file of current magazines, as well as newspapers from all the large cities, help to take care of any stormy hours when Jack may not prefer to be on deck. A good title for this picture would be, "Why boys leave home," and the best part of it is that they come back real men.
Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo & text by The Logan Republican. (Logan, Utah) 1902-1924, 17 April 1920, Image 3, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 186k The New Mexico (BB-40), at Bremerton, Washington, circa 1920. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-40 New Mexico244kLet's Go New Mexico! Image and text provided by University of New Mexico.
Photo & text by The Columbus Weekly Courier. (Columbus, N.M.) 1920-1921, 24 December 1920, Image 2, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 435k Shown here about 1920 showing the distinctive bridge of the class, as completed. Wet, hull mounted secondary guns have been removed and the ports plated over. USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
BB-40 New Mexico 92k Members of the 4th Marine Brigade stand for inspection on board the battleship New Mexico (BB-40) with other ships of the Battle Fleet. U.S. National Archives photo and text from An Illustrated History of the United States Navy by Chester G. Hearn courtesy of Robert Hurst.
BB-43 Tennessee 237k Foreground is definitely Tennessee (BB-43). In the middle is Idaho (BB-42) (darker camouflage note also the fantail catapult) and upper right is Arizona (BB-39), less certain but based on main mast platforms verses the New Mexico (BB-40). Middle background is New York (BB-34) (navigation bridge not over hanging conning tower). The far left background is the Texas (BB-35) (blunt bow, 2 funnels).
The aircraft is a Naval Aircraft Factory / Curtiss / Canadian Aeroplane Ltd F-5L.
The date of Mr. Kreisman's photo has to be 1920-1921. By 1922 all 14' and 16" gunned BB's (except New York and Texas as the 5th turret did not leave enough deck space) had been fitted with a compressed air catapult on the stern. The presence of a stern A/C catapult on only one of the three 1916 program BB's suggest this early in the introduction of this equipment but late enough for the turret top fly-off platforms to have been removed from all ships present. In 1919 the Battle Fleet shifted its base to San Pedro in California where it remained based until shifted to Pearl Harbor. The Texas and New York were assigned to that fleet until they returned east for modernization in 1925. This would suggest that the photo was taken some where in the Pacific. The rich flora onshore suggest a tropical climate and the enclosed by would lead me to guess Panama or Gitmo. If the 1920 or 1921 Fleet problem was conducted in Atlantic waters could explain an Atlantic based aircraft with a Pacific based Fleet.
Photo courtesy of Lance Kreisman via Fabio Pen~a.
Photo & text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn, Alan Moore & Richard Jensen.
Aircraft i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore via Larkins, William T. US Navy Aircraft 1921-1941/US Marine Corps Aircraft 1914-1959. [The image came from the USMC aircraft section, pg(9).] Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 1995. (originally published as US Marine Corps Aircraft 1914-1959, copyright 1959, and US Navy Aircraft 1921-1941, copyright 1961).
BB-40 New Mexico819kProw Of The Battleship New Mexico (BB-40) Towering Above Huge Balboa Drydock
This unusual photograph shows the towering prow of the dreadnought New Mexico as seen from the floor of the huge drydock, 1,000 feet in length at Balboa, Panama Canal Zone. Hundreds of the battleship's crew are scraping and repainting her.
Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ.
Photo & text by Arizona Republican. (Phoenix, Ariz.) 1890-1930, 13 February 1921, Section Two, Image 22, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
PDF added 07/27/15.
BB-38 526k Canal Zone on 17 February 1921: The nearer ship is New Mexico (BB-40). The ship pierside behind the tanker is Pennsylvania (BB-38). Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Photo from the collection of Lieutenant Thomas Marshall Colston during his naval service.
US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 1986.094.001.128.
BB-40 New Mexico 119k Photograph taken by George R. Watson, L.A. Times staff photographer on 4 January 1921, from the forward turret of the New Mexico (BB-40) just as the former Hun sea scourge, UB-88 indicated by arrow, sank by the bow in her last dive. At the extreme right is the destroyer Wickes (DD-75), which acted as executioner and which had already passed it's target and the New Mexico as the UB-88 sank, though it began firing two miles to the left. In the inset are Admiral Rodman and Fred L. Baker. Photo & text courtesy of ub88.org.
BB-40 New Mexico 586k Warm day and plenty of sunshine off somewhere in California during the roaring 20's. US National Archives photo # 80G-1035062 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-40 New Mexico 580k Starboard quarter view of the New Mexico (BB-40) underway on 8 July 1921. Library of Congress photo # LC-F82-6405 via Mike Green.
BB-30 Florida641kPACIFIC FLEET HAS NEW LEADER
Admiral Eberle right and Major Gen George Barnett of the Marine Corp were snapped on the flagship New Mexico (BB-40) in San Francisco Bay when Eberle took over command of the Pacific fleet.
Image and text provided by State Historical Society of Missouri; Columbia, MO.
Photo courtesy of The Columbia Evening Missourian. (Columbia, Mo.) 1920-1923, 18 July 1921, LAST EDITION, Image 5, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 335k At anchor in the early 1920's. Range finders and fire control areas (on her masts) are easily seen. USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
BB-40 New Mexico 295k Awnings cover the stern as a gig pull up in the early 1920's. Another battleship protrudes behind her flag on the stern. USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
BB-40 New Mexico 271k California sunshine on the New Mexico (BB-40) 1922 - 24. Note the height of the navigation bridge relative to the roof of the conning tower. USN photo courtesy of Paul & Barbara Rebold.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Timothy Choi & Chris Hoehn.
BB-36 Nevada505kCrews from the Nevada (BB-36) & New Mexico (BB-40) engage in boat races under oar power with Point Loma on the horizon during the early 1920's.
Of the many ships pictured, the MacDonough (DD-331) is in the upper right and the Williamson (DD-244) is in the upper left. The other destroyers remain unidentified.
From the collection of Benetta Buell.
BB-28 Delaware819kPanoramic photo of the U.S. fleet in Panama Bay (Pacific entrance to the Panama Canal) on 1 March 1923. 70 vessels are viewed; the Battle Fleet consists of all U.S. battleships from the Delaware (BB-28) through the Idaho (BB-42). Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, courtesy of Tom Kermen. Copyright R.G. Lewis, Y Photo Shop, Balboa, C.Z."
BB-40 New Mexico 61k Captain Yates Stirling, Jr. was the commanding officer of the battleship New Mexico (BB-40) from 16 June 1922 to 26 June 1924. The New Mexico was the flagship of Vice Admiral Henry A. Wiley. Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division via Bill Gonyo.
BB-40 New Mexico 74k PDF four page souvenir booklet from the battleship New Mexico (BB-40) for the celebration of Navy Day in San Francisco, 27 October 1924. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-40 New Mexico 787k New Mexico (BB-40) in the Culebra Cut, Panama Canal circa pre-modernization (pre-1925, too). Notice the awning providing shade on the bow and the hammocks hanging out to dry. Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command, Photo No. 2000.277.003 via Mike Green.
Southern Cruise89kIn the summer of 1925, the California (BB-44) led the Battle Fleet and a division of cruisers from the Scouting Fleet on a very successful good-will cruise to Australia and New Zealand.
New Mexico (BB-40) is clearly the ship at the head of the column. Photograph probably taken from the California.
Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Southern Cruise90kView from the deck of a one of the battleships looking aft of the Battle Fleet and a division of cruisers from the Scouting Fleet cruise to Australia and New Zealand. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri. Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-40 New Mexico 43k Cruise poster. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 46k Capt. Brumby, New Mexico's (BB-40) skipper for the 1925 cruise. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 57k New Mexico (BB-40) in Balboa Drydock. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 52k Belly Up Panama City. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 39k Crossing the Equator, Royal Astronomer, 1925. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 38k Ship's band. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 46k Going South. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 55k Ship rigged for dancing. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 71k Shellbacks at last, 6 July 1925. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 47k King Neptune. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 40k Queen & Princess at the Neptune Party. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 52k The Royal Family. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 71k Meat for the Royal Bears. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 65k Royal Undertaker, Torturer, Devils & Chaplain at the Neptune Party. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 84k Judges, Prosecutors, Recorders & Scribes at Neptune Party at crossing of the Equator. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 55k King Neptune and his Court at crossing of the Equator, 6 July 1925. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 49k Royal Trumpeters and dancers at the crossing of the Equator 6 July 1925. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 49k Royal Barbers at the crossing of the Equator 6 July 1925. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 43k Davey Jones. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 76k Admiral Denbiegh and party. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 63k Adm. Denbiegh comes aboard the New Mexico (BB-40). Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 52k Battleship Div 4 in Sydney harbor, 23 July 1925. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 84k Fleet Parade, Sydney, Australia, 23 July 1925. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 32k Jimmie Waterman, Boxer 144 lbs. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 53k 1925 Boxing squad. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 51k New Mexico's (BB-40) rowing team. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 54k Officers and Petty Officers in charge of turret # 2 record setting gun crew for the highest pointers score ever made by 14"50 caliber gun. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 54k "Worlds Record Breakers, Second set of pointers turret # 2." Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 47k Plane prepares to launch from a catapult on the New Mexico's(BB-40) fantail. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 62k Airborne. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 57k Navy Goodwill photo. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 59k Heading to NY, 1924. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-40 New Mexico 55k Looking down from the forecastle over the bow. Photo courtesy of Tom Totoris, MCPO, USN Ret 1971-1997.
BB-45 Colorado106kThe United States Battle Fleet steaming in column off the California coast during the middle or later 1920s. The three leading ships are (in no particular order) Colorado (BB-45), Maryland (BB-46) and West Virginia (BB-48) followed by Tennessee (BB-43) and three older battleships. Photograph taken from California (BB-44).Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-695093, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-45 Colorado54kThe photo here might be on the same occasion as the above, but from a different angle. Then again maybe not. It was taken off a 16mm film. Official USN photo courtesy of periscopefilm.com.
Battlefleet44kThe U.S. battle fleet framed through a porthole. It was taken off a 16mm film. Photo might be from the same sequence as above.Official USN photo courtesy of periscopefilm.com.
BB-40 New Mexico 2.44k Langley (CV-1) with Vought VE-7 aircraft on deck, at anchor off Culebra Island, Puerto Rico on 18 March 1926. In the background are 4 four-stack destroyers and a Tennessee class (BB-43 /44) battleship on the left, and two New Mexico (BB-40 /42) class battleships (center and right).
At the time, the Tennessee's are hard to tell apart. A few years later, Tennessee (BB-43) had the open bridge added around her pilothouse, and even later, California (BB-44) added the enlarged flag bridge. But in the 1922 (or so) period, they were close in config.
The New Mexico's appear to be Mississippi (BB-41) on the left (or in the center) and New Mexico (BB-40) (nearly bow-on) on the right.
The original photo was labeled "Harbinger" to show symbolically how the unimposing Langley was the first of a line of ships which eventually drove the battleship from its primary place into the background.
Photo i.d. & text in italics courtesy of Richard Jensen.
USN photo via collections.naval.aviation.museum.
Almost Unknown709kDifferent angle of the above photo: Langley (CV-1) & Battleships at anchor off Culebra Island, Puerto Rico 18 March 1926.USN photo NARA II 80-G-185902 via courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-40 New Mexico 166k New Mexico (BB-40) at Seattle. Photo courtesy of Tommy Trampp.
BB-40 New Mexico 126k View of the boat deck of the New Mexico (BB-40) in 1926. Photo courtesy of LCDR (Ret) Thomas Donegan & Mike Donegan.
BB-40 New Mexico 101k View of the catapult on the New Mexico (BB-40) in 1926. Photo courtesy of LCDR (Ret) Thomas Donegan & Mike Donegan.
BB-40 New Mexico 137k A Vought O2U-1, designation 4-O-1, is catapulted from the New Mexico (BB-40). Note the colored tail of the aircraft. Photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi 477k The 3 sisters of the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class.
1st is New Mexico (BB-40) (pilot house above conning tower). 2nd is Idaho (BB-42) (pilothouse is wider), 3rd is Mississippi (BB-41) (by default).
The 2 photos appear to be in sequence though one of them is printed with the negetive reversed. The far shore line and the ships in the background beyond the last BB appear to be the same except for what is revealed or concealed by the forward progress of the ships.
Text & photo i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
Photo possibly by Frank Lynch, chief photographer of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, circa 1929.
Photo from the collection of Carrie Schmidt.
BB-46 Maryland1.74k Maryland (BB-46) with a Vought O2U Corsair in the water near her stern. New Mexico (BB-40) is behind the Maryland .
The Vought O2U Corsair dates the photo from 1927 - 1928.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Photo courtesy of Alan K. Radecki.
Battlefleet122kWatercolor of a Presidential review during President Hoover's term of office, 1928-32.
Crews line the rails of a Colorado class (BB-45 / 48) battleship as the ships pass in line astern of the reviewing stand with the airship Los Angeles (ZR-3) piercing the clouds accompanied by 9 biplanes.
Courtesy of Michael Schwarz.
Battlefleet56kView of the U.S. Battle fleet from above, possibly from the airship Los Angeles (ZR-3). Photo courtesy of periscopefilm.com.
BB-40 New Mexico 71k Forward turrets of the New Mexico (BB-40) off Nova Scotia, sometime before modernization in 1930. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-40 New Mexico 134k Bow on view of the New Mexico (BB-40), from a post card, pre-1930, before rebuilding. Reverse side of the card says: "One of the boats of fleet in Hum Bay at Eureka CA. Did God ever intend such a killing machine as this?" Inset photo could be Capt. Ashley H. Robertson. Courtesy of Kelly McCaw.
BB-40 New Mexico 119k Shown here in 1930, just before rebuilding, she has catapults on both the fantail and #3 turret. A gunnery "E" adorns the side of her conning tower. USN photo.
BB-40 New Mexico 88k Four photos for the 1933 400 KW Turbine Gear Generator Sets for the battleships:
New Mexico (BB-40), Mississippi (BB-41), Idaho (BB-42), Tennessee (BB-43) & Colorado (BB-45).
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 5
Figure 4
Photos courtesy of Ed Zajkowski.
BB-40 New Mexico 104k New Mexico (BB-40) being rebuilt and modernized at the Philadelphia Navy Yard between 5 March 1931 to 22 January 1933. Her other two sisters were rebuilt at Norfolk Navy Yard. The Coast Guard destroyers are the Tucker (CG-23), formerly DD-57 and the Cassin (CG-1), formerly DD-43. Photo courtesy of uscg.mil., submitted by Mike Green.
Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-40 New Mexico 72k Inboard profile of the New Mexico (BB-40), 1930. Photo and text courtesy of U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
BB-34 New York413k New York (BB-34) ahead of Pennsylvania (BB-38). The next ship ahead is a Tennessee class (BB-43 /44) based on the slope of the turret roofs. (Uniform slope back to front - no kink like the twin 16" mounts on the Colorado's (BB-45). Based on the relatively full appearance of the forward superstructure, I am leaning toward California (BB-44) which had an enlarged flag bridge as Battle Force Flagship. The other three are obviously Tennessee (BB-43) and/or Colorado class (BB-45 / 48) but are too indistinct to ID specifically. Because of the boom cranes on the sterns, the photo was taken between 1931 and 1934. Photo courtesy of Kerry Garrett.
Photo & text i.d. courtesy of Richard M. Jensen.
BB-40 New Mexico 130k 3, 4, & 5. Overhead port bow, water-level starboard quarter, and overhead starboard bow views of the rebuilt ship taken in the mid 1930s. The three views show the rebuilt ship's new appearance and new locations of her equipment after her extensive rebuild at Philadelphia Navy Yard that took from 5 March 1931 to 22 January 1933.
The three New Mexico's (BB-40-42) were the last to be rebuilt. They could be distinguished by their searchlight platforms. The Mississippi and Idaho (BB-42) had theirs far above their controls, with long struts, but the New Mexico (BB-40) had her control cabins directly under the lights. Quite unlike their predecessors, they had tower masts supporting Mark-28 5-inch directors, the first to combine range finder and calculator into a single unit. The small cylinders were mark 31 directors, with an armored range finder at the forward end of the bridge structure. Below it, were secondary battery controls and battle lookout stations (note the eye slits), with the navigating bridge below that, then the chart house platform, the radio direction-finder platform, and the conning tower platform. Note the four 0.50-caliber machine guns visible on the latter. The radio direction finder itself was housed between the funnel and the bridge structure. The Idaho, fitted as a flagship, had a flag bridge below her navigating bridge. Her chart house was on the radio direction-finder platform.
USN photo. Partial text courtesy of U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
BB-40 New Mexico 135k 3, 4, & 5. Overhead port bow, water level starboard quarter, and overhead starboard bow views of the rebuilt ship taken in the mid 1930s. The three views show the rebuilt ship's new appearance and new locations of her equipment after her extensive rebuild at Philadelphia Navy Yard that took from 5 March 1931 to 22 January 1933. USN photo.
BB-40 New Mexico 134k 3, 4, & 5. Overhead port bow, water level starboard quarter, and overhead starboard bow views of the rebuilt ship taken in the mid 1930s. The three views show the rebuilt ship's new appearance and new locations of her equipment after her extensive rebuild at Philadelphia Navy Yard that took from 5 March 1931 to 22 January 1933. USN photo.
BB-40 New Mexico 210k New Mexico (BB-40) at anchor; photo taken after modernization. Note the complete absence of cage masts and the nice new forward superstructure with a big DP director on top. Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
Text i.d. courtesy of Chuck Haberlein.
BB-40 New Mexico 85k New Mexico (BB-40) after modernization in 1933. Official USN photo USNHC # NH 60669, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico 123k Canvass covered awning covers the bow area of the New Mexico (BB-40) while resupplying. Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Photo courtesy of Floyd Proffitt via Brad Proffitt.
1934 - Pre-Pearl Harbor Attack
BB-40 New Mexico 71k New Mexico (BB-40) moored in the Hudson River with the Statue of Liberty in the background, June 1934. New Mexico returned to the Pacific in October 1934 to resume training exercises and tactical development operations. USN photo.
Text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-40 New Mexico & family242kNew Mexico (BB-40) and her sisters lie in anchor, probably at San Pedro California sometime between October 1934 & 6 December 1940 before she was transferred to Pearl Harbor. The Idaho (BB-42) is the ship top left. Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-42 Idaho280kIdaho (BB-42) & New Mexico (BB-40) at anchor in Seattle, circa during her participation in Fleet Week, July - August 1935.USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
BB-40 New Mexico 153k In Pearl Harbor, 1935. Official USN photo USNHC # NH 50299, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico 116k A Vought O3U-1 aboard New Mexico (BB-40) in 1935. Note the Captain's gig with the NM designation tied up inboard of the Staff Officers boat from Pennsylvania (BB-38) to the port boat boom. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-40 New Mexico 67k Capt. Frank Jack Fletcher Commanding Officer of battleship New Mexico (BB-40) from 1936 to 1937. USN photo courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
Battleship Row1.80kVery large (1.80k.b) 1936 photo of Battleship Row, Pearl Harbor. Among the ships in the harbor are:
The two New Orleans (CA-32) class cruisers on the far left are the Minneapolis (CA-36) nearer the camera with New Orleans (CA-32) behind. Both have the curved-faced turrets, limiting them to the CA-32/34/36 group. Within that group, only New Orleans lacked the glassed-in navigation bridge (below the pilothouse), and minor superstructure variations point to the other being Minneapolis rather than Astoria (CA-34).
The battleships from left to right: Colorado (BB-45), or West Virginia (BB-48), outboard of Idaho (BB-42), Nevada (BB-36), outboard of Mississippi (BB-41), New Mexico (BB-40), outboard of Maryland (BB-46) or California (BB-44).
On the far right is the Hospital ship Relief (AH-1) with two unidentified ships ahead and to her port side.
Text courtesy of David Johnston, (USNR), Aryeh Wetherhorn (USNR) & Richard Jensen.
Photo courtesy of Edward Cwalinski, submitted by Barry Litchfield.
BB-40 New Mexico 95k Forward turrets of the New Mexico (BB-40) all dressed up, circa 1930's.
The practice of gunnery at the beginning of the 20th century put a lot of emphasis on shooting first. Radio communications was still in diapers (cumbersome, morse code, slow) and visual signals, light, flag hoist or semaphore, were not much better. When an enemy was detected it also took time to train and elevate the guns to shoot at him. In poor visibility this might give him the first shot. The range clocks, and their companion, the deflection markers, were developed to shorten the time needed to get off the first salvo.
Concentration of fire was also a major consideration, and usually all ships of a division would fire on the same target. Fire control was based on mechanical analog devices that incorporated input from the optical range finders located at several places on the ship. In USN ships this included the top of the cage mast.
Long range visibility under battle conditions was often poor. The heavy black smoke from burning coal just made it worse. But individual ships could be expected to have a reasonably clear view of the next ship ahead in the division line. The flagship was almost always in the lead, and could direct concentration of fire by passing range and deflection data to the other ships. This process was made much faster by simply training the flagships own guns in the direction of the enemy and displaying the ships own average rangefinder results on a circular display. Trailing ships often did not have as good a view of the enemy as the leader, but could observe where the leaders guns were aimed (and read numbers from the range clock) in order to set initial values for aiming their own guns. That is enough of the background theory.
There was no CIC as we know it today, but there was a central fire control plot on each ship. This plot included a MECHANICAL device for determining and transmitting refined settings for azimuth and elevation of the guns. Initial inputs were often set manually. Communications between the plot and the gun turrets (and the range clocks) included up to 4 separate and parallel methods. First, there was a mechanical connection, usually a bicycle chain and sprocket drive to ensure equivalent movement. Second, voice tubes connected the plot with rangefinder positions and guns. Third, when they became available, there were internal communications telephones matching the above circuits. Finally, if other means failed, you could write a note and send it by messenger.
There is an excellent series of articles on battleship gunnery fire control in this era in WARSHIP INTERNATIONAL. vol 38 numbers 1,2,3 (2001) and also vol 41. It is devoted to the plotting instruments, not range clocks.
As a final note, I'm sure you already noticed that the range "clocks" are numbered from 1 to 10, not 1 to 12. The figures were usually given in thousands of yards.
USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Text courtesy of Aryeh Wetherhorn, (USN & Israeli Navy, Retired).
BB-40 New Mexico 49k New Mexico (BB-40) & Lexington (CV-2) in Bremerton, 1937. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-38 Pennsylvania654kSTANDING OUT TO SEA, BATTLESHIPS OF THE U.S. NAVY STEAM IN CRUISING FORMATION
Beneath gleaming 14 inch guns, bluejackets aboard the Pennsylvania (BB-38) secure anchor and ground tackle. Commissioned in 1916 before the advent of the clipper, or overhanging bow, the ship has a blunt or overhanging forecastle. Immeadiatley ahead steams the New Mexico (BB-40) with the Nevada (BB-36) at the right.
USNI Photo Navy Recruiting Bureau, N.Y.
BB-40 New Mexico 441k Mississippi (BB-41) and New Mexico (BB-40) during the Fleet Review staged outside Los Angeles Harbor. December, 1938. USNI photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-40 New Mexico 518k Norfolk VA., 12 April 1939. "The New Mexico (BB-40) takes on supplies".
Hungry after prolonged stay at sea during fleet maneuvers, the New Mexico takes on supplies from small craft upon arrival at Hampton Roads today. This air view gives excellent picture of one of the mightiest of the U.S. Navy's sea might. The ship will remain anchored here for fleet review on 27 April when the Sec. of Navy and foreign diplomats will be on hand.
A.P. Wirephoto from the collection of Micheal Strout, courtesy of Jonathan Eno.
BB-40 New Mexico139kBattleship New Mexico (BB-40) during maneuvers in Hawaii, 1940.
Another "flag" plane in Admiral Blue with Silver tail (only CinCUS's plane was all blue.), for Commander Battleships, Battle Force. The other three SOC-3s are New Mexico's VO-3 (Observation Squadron Three) compliment.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore..
Photographer: Carl Mydans, courtesy of life.time.com
BB-40 New Mexico 280k Pacific Aerial Surveys photo of the New Mexico (BB-40), probably during the Spring of 1940 when she was undergoing modernization. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-40 New Mexico 184k Post card photo of the New Mexico (BB-40), possibly during the Spring of 1940 when she was undergoing modernization. USN photo courtesy of Mike Wade via Gary Priolo.
BB-40 New Mexico 52k New Mexico (BB-40) at the Puget Sound Navy Yard undergoing modernization, 24 April 1940. Note the barrage ballon overhead. USN photo, courtesy of Seattle NARA RG-181, submitted by Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-40 New Mexico & family463kProbable front and rear photos here and below showing formations of aircraft flying over U.S. Navy battleships during exercises at sea, circa late 1930's - 1940.
Pictured here is a New Mexico (BB-40 /42) class battleship in the van with other battleships of the Pacific Fleet and a carrier air group, led by the Air Group Commander in a Curtiss SBC Helldiver.
The aircraft following are:
A torpedo squadron of eighteen Douglas TBD-1s;
A bombing squadron of eighteen Northrop BT-1s;
A scouting squadron eighteen Curtiss SBCs;
A fighting squadron of eighteen Grumman F2F-1s or F3F-3s from either the Yorktown (CV-5) or F3F-2s from the Enterprise (CV-6), plus possibly nine additional aircraft.
The Yorktown and Enterprise were the only two carriers whose bombing squadrons were equipped with the Northrop BT-1.
The text for the photo reads:
"The Navy uses enormous amounts of rubber. At least seventy-five tons of rubber, enough to makes 17,000 tires, are used in the construction of each of these battleships. Tons more are needed for the naval planes that are making history over the world. Medical and communication requirements--and countless other needs of the Navy--are met."
The lead BB looks like Mississippi (BB-41) followed by Maryland (BB-46) (rangefinder on Turret II). My first impression of the Tennessee class (BB-43 /44) is the Tennessee (BB-43), but that is not a certain ID from this photo alone. Fourth is the Oklahoma (BB-37) (no birdbath). Aside from the DD now in the lead, I see nothing in the head-on shot aerial that positively differs from the ID's of the first 4 BB's in the first photo. Of course, in the aft aerial shot, BB #5 is the California (BB-44), ID'd by the enlarged flag bridge, lending support to BB #3 in the first photo being Tennessee. Everything I see supports these three photos all being part of the same operation with at least the first 5 BB's remaining in the same order.
Photograph # LC-USE64 - DC-000944 & partial text courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Battleship i.d. & text courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Aircraft i.d. & text & timeline courtesy of Alan Moore via the following sources: Airplane i.d.: Yorktown Class Carriers (Warship Pictorial No. 9) by Steve Wiper, Tucson, AZ: Classic Warships Publishing, 2000. & That Gallant Ship: U.S.S. Yorktown (CV-5) by Robert Cressman, Missoula, MT: Pictorial Histories Pub Co, 1985. Timeline from Battleship Arizona: An Illustrated History by Paul Stillwell, Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1991.
BB-40 New Mexico & family1.62kProbable front and rear photos here and above showing formations of aircraft flying over U.S. Navy battleships during exercises at sea, circa late 1930's - 1940.
In both photos, one of the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) is leading the BB column while the remaining battleships have dual masthead fire control structures.
The air group formation in the two photos appears to be similar. The composition of 18 TBDs, 18 BT-1s, 18 SBCs, and 27 fighters is easier to distinguish in the front/surface view. I'm assuming, based on total aircraft count alone, that the formation in the rear/aerial view is the same. (The perspective makes it difficult to sort the monoplanes and biplanes into their respective types.) The only difference is that in the front/surface view the formation is lead by a Curtiss SBC Helldiver (likely the Air Group Commander) but in the rear/aerial view that lead Helldiver is not present. I suppose it's possible that the photographer was in that Helldiver's rear seat. What stands out for me is the presence of nine extra fighters beyond the normal squadron composition of 18, as seen in the other three squadrons in this formation.
Photo i.d courtesy of Chuck Haberlein, Richard Jensen, Aryeh Wetherhorn, & Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Battleship i.d. & text courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Aircraft i.d. & text courtesy of Alan Moore.
US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, photo No. 2008.104.001.234.
BB-39 Arizona1.31kBetween 9 & 13 September 1940 the Arizona (BB-39) was under way with other ships of the US Fleet for simulated fleet engagement. She is pictured here in company with other ships of the Pacific Fleet taken during Fleet Ops. and at least one carrier air group.US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 2008.104.001.235 courtesy of Alan Moore.
Text & photo i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore via Battleship Arizona: An Illustrated History by Paul Stillwell, Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1991.
BB-39 Arizona367kColumn Right!
Arizona (BB-39), New Mexico (BB-40) & West Virginia (BB-48) and other ships of the Pacific Fleet taken during Fleet Ops in October 1940.
This photo and the following five are more than likely from the LIFE issue of 28 October 1940: "The Navy: LIFE Goes into Action with the U.S. Fleet".
One of the introductory paragraphs reads as follows:
"To show itself to the American people, the U.S. Navy has co-operated with LIFE in this issue. LIFE photographers and reporters examined naval schools, ammunition depots, bases, destroyers, battleships, the War College, etc. Finally a LIFE crew sailed on the U.S. Fleet maneuvers last month off Pearl Harbor in mid-Pacific."
US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 2008.104.001.235 courtesy of Alan Moore.
Text & photo i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore via Battleship Arizona: An Illustrated History by Paul Stillwell, Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1991 & "The Navy: LIFE Goes into Action with the U.S. Fleet". Life. New York: Time, Inc., Vol 9 No 18 (28 October 1940). p23.
BB-39 Arizona54kFirst (not pictured here)of three photos with the caption "The enemy is sighted off right. Swiftly the battleships New Mexico (BB-40) and Arizona (BB-39) change direction."
The second photo (here) has the caption: "Wheeling into new position of line abreast, battleships move slowly while other ships speed into position."
Appended is the text that appeared on the photo credits page of that issue.
Carl Mydans, LIFE’s photo-reporter who roamed battlefields in Finland and France from September 1939 to June 1940, now turns his lens on the U. S. Navy (see pp. 23—97). During one month with the Fleet in the Pacific, Mydans took pictures aboard a battleship, a cruiser, a destroyer, a submarine, a hospital ship and a repair ship. Mydans also spent some time in the brig of the Indianapolis (CA-35).
Early one morning he had climbed onto a platform over the Admiral’s bridge, when a gust of wind blew sunshade and filter from his Zeiss Super-Ikonta camera. They fell near Vice Admiral Adolphus Andrews, commander of the Scouting Force. After lunch Mydans was served with a paper charging him with “willfully, maliciously and without justifiable cause” assaulting and attempting to strike with a dangerous weapon of German manufacture one Adolphus Andrews, Vice Admiral. With mock solemnity he was taken to the brig and locked up. Few moments later the entire wardroom, from executive officer down, descended and peered through the grille at Prisoner Mydans. When each had enjoyed a good laugh, Mydans was set free.
Photo by Carl Mydans, Time, Inc, submitted courtesy Pieter Bakels. Text & photo i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore. "The Navy: LIFE Goes into Action with the U.S. Fleet". Life. New York: Time, Inc., Vol 9 No 18 (28 October 1940). p.28 & 29.
BB-39 Arizona496kThe third photo (here) is captioned:
"Battleships head directly toward the enemy over the horizon, ready to from line of battle either way."
Photo by Carl Mydans, Time, Inc, submitted courtesy Pieter Bakels. Text & photo i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore. "The Navy: LIFE Goes into Action with the U.S. Fleet". Life. New York: Time, Inc., Vol 9 No 18 (28 October 1940). p.28 & 29.
BB-40 New Mexico 280k Photo by George Winstead of the New Mexico (BB-40) probably when she sailed to join the Atlantic fleet at Norfolk 16 June 1941 for duty on neutrality patrol. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
WW II
BB-40 New Mexico 373k New Mexico (BB-40), view looking forward from the stern, at Norfolk, 31 December 1941. USN Photograph # 2610 (42) courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-40 New Mexico 448k Port bow closeup of the New Mexico (BB-40), at Norfolk, 31 December 1941. USN Photograph # 2610 (42) courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-40 New Mexico 347k View from bow looking aft of the New Mexico (BB-40), at Norfolk, 31 December 1941. USN Photograph # 2610 (42) courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-40 New Mexico 429k Port quarter view of the New Mexico (BB-40), at Norfolk, 31 December 1941. USN Photograph # 2610 (42) courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-40 New Mexico 783k Following two photos show the New Mexico (BB-40) at Norfolk, 31 December 1941. She is equipped with the then "state of the art" quadruple 1.1"/75 machine guns [later replaced by the Bofors 40mm gun(s)]. She has also just been fitted with 20mm Oerkilons, but still was equipped with 0.5 caliber machine guns which the 20mm ultimately replaced. She also carries two radar units; a surface search set (Mark 3) on top of her forward main battery director atop her tower bridge and an air search SC unit on her pole main mast.
The tug YT-213 is pulling alongside Menemsha (AG-39).
Across the pier from her is the new destroyer O'Brien (DD-415). She would be torpedoed by the Japanese Submarine I-15 15 September 1942 and sank 19 October 1942 while en route to Pearl Harbor for repairs.
USN Photograph # 2611 (42) courtesy of Pieter Bakels. Photo i.d. courtesy of Gary Priolo.
BB-40 New Mexico 368k The New Mexico (BB-40) at Norfolk, 31 December 1941. She is equipped with the then "state of the art" quadruple 1.1"/75 machine guns [later replaced by the Bofors 40mm gun(s)]. She has also just been fitted with 20mm Oerkilons, but still was equipped with 0.5 caliber machine guns which the 20mm ultimately replaced. The camouflaged ship alongside the near side of the next pier is George F. Elliott (AP-13). Note: number "40" painted atop New Mexico's second 14"/50 triple gun turret; Mark 33 and other gun directors atop her superstructure; FC radar antenna on one of the directors and SC radar antenna mounted at the top of her mainmast.
New Mexico is in the process of being painted up in splotches. This picture is just one of an extensive close-up series showing all three New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class battleships being repainted at the same time. The sun is very low, coming strong off the port bow. This is causing the angled surfaces on the bridge (and all other shapes in the same plane) to appear to be "washed out" of color.
Note the sailors on top of turret #1 (left side of photo, extreme bottom). They are applying 5-H. Earlier they had spilled some on the roof, leaving a circle from the paint can. Mississippi (BB-41) in the background is still in Measure 1. Close-ups show her caulk marked to be painted in slotches of S.B. (5-S) and O.G. (5-0) only. Idaho (BB-42) (not shown), New Mexico and the vessel behind her all carried standard three color splotch patterns of 5-S, 5-0 and 5-H."
Partial text courtesy of USNHC photo # 19-N-27362. Camouflage text courtesy of "United States Navy CAMOUFLAGE of the WW2 ERA" by Larry Sowinsky, the "Floating Drydock", Phil.PA.,1976.) & submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-40 New Mexico180kPresident Hayes (AP-39) view from overhead, looking forward from just off the starboard side amidships, while the ship was at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, Virginia, 2 January 1942. Note her large smokestack, with a rather small exhaust at its after end, ship's bell mounted on the smokestack base, and the landing craft davits on the midships' superstructure. The lighter YF-244 is alongside the battleship New Mexico (BB-40) at left. Photograph USNHC # NH 93910, from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico 1.5m View from overhead of the New Mexico (BB-40) underway 4 December 1942, indicating that it was taken out of Pearl Harbor. Photo # 5300-42 courtesy of David Buell.
BB-40 New Mexico 358k A small boat speeds along the length of the New Mexico (BB-40), probably at Pearl Harbor in December 1942. In 1943 she would go to Puget Sound for a refit when she received SK radar and other modifications. BuShips photo #40215 courtesy of David Buell.
BB-40 New Mexico 73k Off the Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington, following overhaul, 6 October 1943. A barge and motor launch are alongside her port quarter, with Sailors coming on board from the latter. Official USN photo USNHC # NH 97414, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico 70k Bow view off the Puget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington, following overhaul, 6 October 1943. Official USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-40 New Mexico 303k New Mexico (BB-40) underway near Pearl Harbor sometime around November 1943. She is wearing Measure 21 camouflage with a new gallery of 20mm Oerlikons P&S of her Stack and SK atop her mainmast. USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-40 New Mexico 1.37k New Mexico (BB-40) taken some time between October 1943 and August 1944, looking forward past Turrets 3 and 4 on the port side aft. USN photo & text courtesy of David Buell.
BB-40 New Mexico 1.78k New Mexico (BB-40) taken some time between October 1943 and August 1944, view of the starboard side from the superstructure just forward of the stack looking down to the secondary AA level. This looks like they had just secured from GQ or battle practice. USN photo & text courtesy of David Buell.
BB-40 New Mexico 271k View of the Efate Hills from New Mexico (BB-40) . Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 369k Efate Clubhouse, wishing you were there. Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 22.57k Church services. Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 278k New Mexico's (BB-40) laundry & galley. Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 160k Lt. Richard Hatch holding a piece of teak wood deck of the Liscomb Bay (CVE-56) which landed on the New Mexico (BB-40) after it exploded on 24 November 1943.
The following PDF's are Plans of the day for the New Mexico's crew.
2 November 1943
16 November 1943
18 November 1943
19 November 1943
25 November 1943
Photo & PDF from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-38 Pennsylvania78kBack at Pearl Harbor after supporting the Gilbert Island invasion, November 1943. The Pennsylvania (BB-38) (left) is shown tied up to the New Mexico (BB-40). The Pennsylvania has been modernized, with increased A.A. protection, and the removal of the tripod mainmast, which increased the A.A. weapons arcs of fire.USN photo.
BB-42 Idaho98kPhotographed from Natoma Bay (CVE-62), shortly after the conclusion of the Gilberts Campaign, September - December 1943. The three battleships, in an anchorage protected by anti-torpedo nets, are (from left to right): Idaho (BB-42); New Mexico (BB-40); and Mississippi (BB-41).Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-275940, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-42 Idaho106kThe Idaho (BB-42), New Mexico (BB-40) Mississippi (BB-41) at Pearl Harbor sometime after 5 December 1943. All three battleships then proceeded with the Marshall Islands assault force 12 January 1944. Photo courtesy of Joseph MacDonald. Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-40 & 42 381k New Mexico (BB-40) & Idaho (BB-42) 7 December 1943, at Pearl Harbor. Note the anti-torpedo net in the foreground. Official USN Photograph # 4-ORD-085-16, courtesy of David Buell.
BB-40 309k Stern view of the New Mexico (BB-40) viewed from one of her sisters, possibly at Pearl Harbor. Note the anti-torpedo net in the foreground. USN Photograph courtesy of David Buell.
BB-40 New Mexico 117k Drawing prepared by the Bureau of Ships for Camouflage Measure 32, Design 6D intended for battleships of the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class. This plan, approved by Captain Logan McKee, USN, is dated 16 February 1944. It shows the ship's starboard side, superstructure ends and exposed decks. Ships known or reported to have worn this camouflage design include New Mexico (BB-40) and Mississippi (BB-41). Official USN photo # 80-G-166247, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico 100k Drawing prepared by the Bureau of Ships for Camouflage Measure 32, Design 6D intended for battleships of the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class. This plan, approved by Captain Logan McKee, USN, is dated 16 February 1944. It shows the ship's port side, superstructure ends and exposed decks. Ships known or reported to have worn this camouflage design include New Mexico (BB-40) and Mississippi (BB-41). Official USN photo # 80-G-166246, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico 250k Thomas F. Grady, MM2c (Machinist's Mate) is standing throttle watch on board New Mexico (BB-40). Photo courtesy of the Kibbe Museum via Bill Gonyo.
BB-40 New Mexico 177k Shelling peninsula. Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 90k Near miss.
The following PDF's concern the Kwajalein Bombardment on 6 February 1944, shelling of Taroa, Maloelap & Wotje on 21 February 1944 & Kavieng Bombardment on 20 March 1944
Photo & PDF's from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 129k New Mexico (BB-40) Mascot Kwajalein, who deserted ship in Australia, 29 May 1944. Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9 /9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 448k The Braine (DD-630) transfers wounded to the battleship New Mexico (BB-40) during a dramatic moment for immediate medical attention after being hit by a Japanese six-inch shore battery off the shores of Tinian in the Mariana Islands on 14 June 1944. The Braine and New Mexico were participants in support of the troop landings during the capture efforts of the islands of Saipan and Tinian. The battleship Colorado (BB-45) and the destroyer Norman Scott (DD-690) were both hit by six inch Japanese shore batteries. The Colorado was hit 22 times, killing 44 men. The Norman Scott was hit six times, killing the captain, Seymore Owens, and 22 of his seamen. After the battle, Tinian became an important base for further Allied bombing operations in the Pacific Campaign. Camps were built for 50,000 troops. Fifteen thousand Seabees turned the island into the busiest and largest airfield of the war, with six 2,400 m runways for attacks by B-29 Superfortress bombers on targets in the Philippines, the Ryukyu Islands and mainland Japan, including the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki to help end hostilities in the Pacific. Photo # 09-7930-26, courtesy of the U.S. Navy BUMED Library and Archives via Bill Gonyo.
BB-40 New Mexico 129k New Mexico's (BB-40) 5"/25 battery prepares to fire during the bombardment of Saipan, 15 June 1944. Note time-fuse setters on the left side of each gun mount, each holding three "fixed" rounds of ammunition; barrels of 20mm machine guns at the extreme right; and triple 14"/50 guns in the background. Official USN photo # 80-G-K-14162, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico 143k Firing at aircraft.
New Mexico (BB-40) bombarded Tinian & Saipan 14 & 15 June, and Guam 16 June, and twice helped drive off enemy air attacks 18 June.
Text courtesy of DANFS.
Photo & PDF's from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9 /9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 139k Transfering a casualty. Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-41 Mississippi 2.47k Either the New Mexico (BB-40) or Mississippi (BB-41) transfers wounded from a destroyer (probably Braine (DD-630) off Saipan, just out of range of shore batteries. Released 6 July 1944. USN photos # 253539 & # 253544, courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-40 New Mexico 169k 5-In column. Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 475k Admirals, Captains, Reporters & Shelling Guam on 16 June 1944. Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 333k Battle Stations at Tinian, Marianas. Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 50k New Mexico's (BB-40) firing her guns in support of invasion of Saipan, June 1944. USNI / USN photo.
BB-40 New Mexico 455k Shelling Saipan on 22 June 1944. Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 246k Medal presentation of the Distinguished Flying Cross (DFC) awarded to Harrison D. Miller for heroism aboard New Mexico (BB-40). Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 59k New Mexico (BB-40) firing her after 14"/50 guns during the pre-invasion bombardment of Guam, circa 14-20 July. Taken by a Combat Photo Unit Two (CPU-2) photographer, looking aft along the port side from the forward sky lookout position. Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-K-14233, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico 159k 14-inch projectiles on deck, while the battleship was replenishing her ammunition supply prior to the invasion of Guam, July 1944. The photograph looks forward on the starboard side, with 3-gun mount 14"/50 gun turrets at left. Note floater nets stowed atop the turrets. Text info courtesy of Daniel Cronan. Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-K-14228, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico 111k Drawing prepared by the Bureau of Ships for Camouflage Measure 32, Design 3D intended for battleships of the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class. This plan, approved by Captain Torvald A. Solberg, USN, is dated 18 August 1944. It shows the ship's starboard side, horizontal surfaces and superstructure ends. Official USN photo # 19-N-104916, from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives
BB-40 New Mexico 113kDrawing prepared by the Bureau of Ships for a camouflage scheme intended for battleships of the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class. This plan, approved by Captain Torvald A. Solberg, USN, is dated 19 August 1944. It shows the ship's port side. Official USN photo # 19-N-104915, from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives
BB-40 New Mexico 313k Capt Zack on bridge. Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 161k In appreciation from the crew of the New Mexico (BB-40). Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 400k Change of Command. Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 480k Water color of the New Mexico (BB-40) painted by the artist Henry Beaumont. Photo from the collection of Capt. Ellis Zacharias, C.O. from 9/9/ 1943 - 14/9/ 1944, courtesy of Capt. Jerry Zacharias, USN (Ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 92k Port side view wearing Camouflage Measure 32, Design 3D on 21 October 1944, Puget Sound Navy Yard showing her final configuration. Ultimate battery of ten quadruple 40mm guns are in place along with 40-45 20mm Oerlikons. All but her six forward 5"/51 caliber guns have been replaced with the dual purpose although somewhat short range 5"/25 caliber open mounts and 40mm quad mounts wherever room was available. Official USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-40 New Mexico 178k Gun barrels on bottom forward turret are painted black; 21 October 1944, Puget Sound Navy Yard. National Archives photo # 19-N-73599 courtesy of David Buell.
BB-40 New Mexico 124k October 1944 stern shot of the New Mexico (BB-40) at Puget Sound Navy Yard. Particularly noticeable is the removal of the #3 turret mounted catapult. She retained the fantail catapult and usually carried two planes. Searchlights have been lowered to almost the base of the stack. Official USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-40 New Mexico 20k Damage caused to the New Mexico (BB-40) after being hit by a "Kamikaze" on 6 January 1945. Photo from WWII Damage Reports, courtesy of NavSea / dcfp.navy.mil.
BB-40 New Mexico 70k At sea with two other battleships and an amphibious force command ship (AGC), probably at the time of the Iwo Jima or Okinawa operations, circa February-April 1945. Battleship in the center background is Idaho (BB-42). The one further to the left is Tennessee (BB-43). Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-K-3706, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico 245k Where there is smoke, there must be fire: Starboard broadside view of the New Mexico (BB-40) or Idaho (BB-42) underway with company and lots of anti-aircraft fire in the offering. USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
Photo i.d. courtesy of David C. Nilsen, CTR USA, TRADOC.
BB-40 New Mexico 290k New Mexico (BB-40) putting up a wall of fire. USN Archives photo # N-3110 courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-40 New Mexico 1.28k New Mexico (BB-40) weighs in at all of her 32,000 tons in this photo. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-40 New Mexico 62k New Mexico (BB-40) is hit by a "Kamikaze" at dusk on 12 May 1945, while off Okinawa. Photographed from Wichita (CA-45). Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-328653, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico 27k Damage caused to the New Mexico (BB-40) after being hit by a "Kamikaze" on 12 May 1945, off the coast of Okinawa. Photo from WWII Damage Reports, courtesy of NavSea / dcfp.navy.mil.
BB-40 New Mexico 92k New Mexico (BB-40) probably dated 13 May, the day after a kamikaze hit and a bomb hit killed 54 of her crew, some of who are shown in this photograph under the flags. USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-40 New Mexico 155k Admirals William F. Halsey (left) and Raymond A. Spruance (right) aboard New Mexico (BB-40) on 27 May 1945. New Mexico had become 5th fleet flagship of Admiral Spruance the previous 5 April. USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-40 New Mexico 382k New Mexico (BB-40) as she dropped anchored in the shadow of Mount Fuji as a unit in the 3rd fleet. USN photo # 80-G-701123 from National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
Post War / Scrapping
By By 1.09k Battleship New Mexico (BB-40) being brought into Boston Navy Yard on 17 October 1945. The North Carolina (BB-55) anchored there also, and after overhaul at New York exercised in New England waters and carried Naval Academy midshipmen for a summer training cruise in the Caribbean. Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
Photo 08_06_022495 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
BB-40 New Mexico 407k "Your's-For a Price" - If you'd like to buy a real live battleship, get your bid to the Navy no later than Tuesday for the 30,600 ton, 29 year old New Mexico (BB-40). Only hitch in the deal; you have to scrap it as soon possible. After all, Uncle Sam wouldn't care for the competition. Here it is, afloat in Boston, for your inspection.
Note that the secondary armament has already been removed.
AP wirephoto courtesy of Sunday News New York's Picture Newpaper 28 September 1947, submitted by Joe MacDonald.
BB-40 New Mexico 410k "Drifting battleship" - The city of Newark & the last "fight" of the New Mexico (BB-40),13 November 1947. Page 1 of 4 with photos from AP Wirephoto. Photo courtesy of Ron Reeves, HTC, (ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 356k "Drifting battleship" - The city of Newark & the last "fight" of the New Mexico (BB-40),13 November 1947. Page 2 of 4 with photos from AP Wirephoto. Photo courtesy of Ron Reeves, HTC, (ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 606k "Drifting battleship" - The city of Newark & the last "fight" of the New Mexico (BB-40),13 November 1947. Page 3 of 4 with photos from AP Wirephoto. Photo courtesy of Ron Reeves, HTC, (ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 662k "Drifting battleship" - The city of Newark & the last "fight" of the New Mexico (BB-40), 13 November 1947. Page 4 of 4 with photos from AP Wirephoto. Photo courtesy of Ron Reeves, HTC, (ret.)
BB-40 New Mexico 357k "Hero's Welcome" - The city of Newark greeted the old battleship New Mexico (BB-40) with school bands, flags and hurrah's as she came to the port for scrapping after a Washington parley had averted the "Battle of Newark Bay".
The city's "navy" of two tiny fire-boats that had planned to bar the the port channel's mouth saluted the battleship with streams of water.
AP Wirephoto courtesy of edition of the Baltimore Evening Sun 20 November 1947., submitted by Joe MacDonald.
BB-32 Wyoming361k"Battleship Graveyard" - Three decommissioned battleships, the Idaho (BB-42) (left foreground), the Wyoming (AG-17), (right foreground), and the New Mexico (BB-40), lie alongside a pier at Port Newark, N.J. were they are being scrapped.
Workmen have progressed with the New Mexico which was the subject of considerable controversy between Newark city officials and the scrapping concern. The Wyoming, most recent arrival, has its gun turrets protected by round white coverings.
Text courtesy of AP Wirephoto of 17 December 1947 edition of the Baltimore Evening Sun, submitted by Joe MacDonald.
Photo courtesy of Warship Boneyards, by Kit and Carolyn Bonner & submitted by Robert Hurst.
BB-42 Idaho193k Three battleships are on their way to Naval Valhalla: New Mexico (BB-40), Idaho (BB-42) , & Wyoming (AG-17) 31 January 1948. Photo courtesy of Ron Reeves, HTC, (ret.)
(NISMF)371kA guest studies a painting depicting the history of battleships. The artwork was painted by George Skybeck and presented to the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association during their annual banquet at Honolulu, Hawaii, on 8 December 1991. USN photo # DN-SC-92-05391, by PHC Carolyn Harris, from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection, courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil.
World War II Memorial371kA quote made by Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz is inscribed on a granite wall at the National World War II Memorial located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Fleet Adm. Nimitz was the United States signatory to the surrender terms aboard the battleship Missouri (BB-63) in Tokyo Bay, Japan on 2 September 1945, thus ending World War II. Established by the American Battle Monuments Commission, the memorial honors all military veterans of World War II, the citizens on the home front, the nation at large, and the high moral purpose and idealism that motivated the nation's call to arms. On 29 May 2004, the memorial was formally dedicated with an estimated 200,000 people expected to attend, and includes 100,000 visiting veterans of all wars. USN photo # N-0295M-011 by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Daniel J. McLain, courtesy of news.navy.mil.

USS NEW MEXICO BB-40 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry

(Located On The Hazegray & Underway Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)

Crew Contact And Reunion Information

Contact Name: Mr. Vernon Dascher
Address: 3064 DeVilla Tr. Saint Louis, MO, 63301
Phone: 636-949-9413
E-mail: OleVernBB40@yahoo.com


Note About Contacts.

The contact listed, Was the contact at the time for this ship when located. If another person now is the contact, E-mail me and I will update this entry. These contacts are compiled from various sources over a long period of time and may or may not be correct. Every effort has been made to list the newest contact if more than one contact was found.


Additional Resources
Hazegray & Underway Battleship Pages By Andrew Toppan.

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