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NavSource Online: Battleship Photo Archive

BB-40 USS NEW MEXICO
1915 - 1920

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1921 - 1930
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1946 - 1947


New Mexico Class Battleship: Displacement 32,000 Tons, Dimensions, 624' (oa) x 97' 5" x 31' 1" (Max). Armament 12 x 14"/50 22 x 5"/51, 8 x 3"/50 2 x 21" tt. Armor, 13 1/2" Belt, 18" Turrets, 3 1/2" +2" Decks, 16" Conning Tower. Machinery, 27,500 SHP; G.E. Geared Turbines with electric drive, 4 screws. Speed, 21 Knots, Crew 1084.

Operational and Building Data: Laid down by New York Navy Yard, October 14, 1915. Launched April 23, 1917. Commissioned May 18, 1918. Decommissioned July 19, 1946. Stricken February 25, 1947.
Fate: Sold November 9, 1947 and broken up for scrap in New York.
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BB-40 New Mexico821kThe First Electric Battleship
Uncle Sam Plans A Surprise for the Naval World In the Construction of the First and Only Electric Battleship - The New California To Be Propelled and Operated Solely By Electricity
One of the New 14 Inch Guns for the California
Image and text provided by University of Vermont.
Photo & text by Burlington Weekly Free Press. (Burlington, Vt.) 1866-1928, 28 January 1915, Image 10, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico962kThe United States new superdreadnought California whose keel will be laid at the New York Navy Yard in the near future, will be the first electrically driven dreadnought in the world.
New Mexico (BB-40) Will Be Only Battleship in World to Use This Power
Serious Problem of Launching the Monster Seafighter Pennsylvania (BB-38).
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo & text by The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, 21 March 1915, FOURTH SECTION PICTORIAL SECTION, Image 49, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Guns 592k Secretary of the Navy Joseph Daniel and other dignitaries attending the keel laying of the then named battleship California on 14 October 1915. The ship, renamed New Mexico (BB-40) was the lead ship in this class of battleships. Source: Library of Congress, Photo No. LC-B2-3633-4. via Mike Green.
Photo added 12/28/14.
Guns 845k Brooklyn Navy Yard workers celebrating the keel laying of the then named battleship California on 14 October 1915. Source: Library of Congress, Photo No. LC-B2-3633-5 via Mike Green.
Photo added 12/28/14.
BB-40 New Mexico693kNO OTHER NAVY WILL HAVE SHIP LIKE CALIFORNIA WHEN SHE IS COMPLETED
The keel of the superdreadnaught California, destined to be the greatest of battleships, was laid at the navy yard in Brooklyn. The event was an epoch in naval construction, and among those who participated were Secretary of the Navy Daniels, Rear Admiral Nathaniel R. Usher, commandant of the great yard in which the California will be rushed to completion; Rear Admiral Robert S. Griffin, the engineer in chief of the navy, and Rear Admiral David W.Taylor, chief of the bureau of construction in Washington.
Her name would be changed before her commissioning to New Mexico (BB-40).
Text i.d. courtesy of Mike Green.
Photo by American Press Association.
Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH. & University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo from The Democratic Banner. (Mt. Vernon, Ohio) 1898-192?, 19 October 1915, Image 1 & The Broad Ax.(Salt Lake City, Utah) 1895-19??, 30 October 1915, Image 2, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico3.92kElectricity to Make Our Latest Battleship Mightiest In World
In the presence of a great throng the keel of the oil-burning turbine engine battleship California was laid with impressive ceremonies at the Brooklyn navy yard.
Photo by Underwood and Underwood.
Image and text provided by Washington State Library; Olympia, WA.
Photo from The Tacoma Times. (Tacoma, Wash.) 1903-1949, 01 November 1915, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico1.07kMightiest of All Fighting Ships
Our New Big Battleship California and Why It Is Different from Any Other War Vessel Ever Designed
Out ot Sight Below the Ocean Horizon the California Could Destroy New York City in Half an Hour with Long-Range Shells Which Would Seem to Drop From the Sky.
One Broadside from All the "California" Guns Would Be Equal to Throwing Six Touring Cars from Sandy Hook to New York.
Image and text provided by Library of Virginia; Richmond, VA.
Photo by Richmond Times-Dispatch. (Richmond, Va.) 1914-current, 07 November 1915, Image 55, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico451kTHE NEW BATTLESHIP NEW MEXICO (BB-40).
This is a picture of the model for the new battleship New Mexico. It will be the greatest dreadnaught afloat when completed. Its sister ships will be the Mississippi (BB-41) and Idaho (BB-42).
Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX.
Photo from El Paso Herald. (El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, 07 April 1916, HOME EDITION, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico713kMIGHTY ENGINES FOR OUR NEWEST WARSHIPS
THE CALIFORNIA - NOT YET IN SERVICE - HAS TURBO ELECTRIC DRIVE
Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE.
Photo & text by The Red Cloud Chief. (Red Cloud, Webster Co., Neb.) 1873-1923, 12 October 1916, Image 6, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Guns 1.10k "U.S. Navy Yard, Washington. Sight shop, big gun section. 1917: Possible future armament for the New Mexico (BB-40 /42) class . Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative, Library of Congress Photo courtesy of shorpy.com.
BB-40 New Mexico 3.16k "Misses Margaret C. DeBaca Virginia Carr, sponsors for the new dreadnought & members of the launching party which came from New Mexico for the ceremony."
"Launching at the Brooklyn Navy Yard on last Monday of the U.S. super-dreadnought New Mexico (BB-40), newest, and with her sister ships the largest and most powerful vessels in the Navy, and the world's first dreadnought to be driven by electric power."
Times Photo Service, text courtesy of N.Y. Times 29 April 1917, Page 1, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico950kNEW U. S. SUPERDREADNOUGHT LEAVING THE WAYS
New Mexico (BB-40), Nation's Greatest Battleship, Takes the Water.

Navy Yard Closely Guarded for Launching, Witnessed by Only 300 Guests. Huge Oil Burning Super-dreadnought Is First To Be Electrically Driven.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 April 1917, Image 3, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico1.93k"Hit First and Hit Hard" U. S. Navy Rule; Here's How Uncle Sam's Gunners Turn Trick
Photo shows range finder to be put on Uncle Sam's newest superdreadnaught, the New Mexico (BB-40); diagram shows how a big gun is fired.
Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota.
Photo & text by The Bismarck Tribune. (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, 09 May 1917, Image 8, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 331k Main battery drawn out as construction continues on the New Mexico (BB-40), 6 October 1917. Brooklyn Navy Yard Archive - courtesy National Archive and Records Administration, Northeast Region - NYC, Record Group 181 via flickr.com.
BB-40 New Mexico 610k Port forward quarter of the New Mexico (BB-40), 6 October 1917. Photo No. f1060n14, Brooklyn Navy Yard Archive - courtesy National Archive and Records Administration, Northeast Region - NYC, Record Group 181 via flickr.com.
BB-40 New Mexico 623k New Mexico (BB-40) in Dry Dock #4, Bow view, January 1918 Photo No. N3480, Brooklyn Navy Yard Archive - courtesy National Archive and Records Administration, Northeast Region - NYC, Record Group 181 via flickr.com.
BB-40 New Mexico 1.4m New Mexico (BB-40) in Dry Dock #4, portside looking aft, January 1918 Photo No. N3478, Brooklyn Navy Yard Archive - courtesy National Archive and Records Administration, Northeast Region - NYC, Record Group 181 via flickr.com.
BB-40 New Mexico 577k New Mexico (BB-40) starboard view, shortly after commissioning, May 1918. Courtesy of Seaman 2nd Class Ralph D Gummerson via Al Gummerson & Tom Bateman & Philip H. Robare RMCS, USN - RET.
BB-40 New Mexico 105k Capt. Ashley Herman Robertson was the Commanding Officer of the New Mexico (BB-40) from May 1918 to September 1918. Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
Almost Unknown280kDaniels Tells Congressmen of Battleship New Mexico's (BB-40) Remarkable Accomplishments Image and text provided by University of New Mexico.
Photo from The Evening Herald. (Albuquerque, N.M.) 1914-1922, 02 January 1919, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Almost Unknown375kParticularly interesting to sightseers were the two latest dreadnoughts added to the navy, the Mississippi (BB-41) and the New Mexico (BB-40), the latter of which is shown here. Both ships are 32,000 tons. Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1833-1916, 05 January 1919, Section 3 Pictorial Magazine, Image 31, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 108k After initial training, New Mexico (BB-40) departed New York 15 January 1919 for Brest, France, to escort home transport George Washington (ID-3018) carrying President Woodrow Wilson from the Versailles Peace Conference, returning to Hampton Roads 27 February. Photo taken from U.S. Warships of World War One, by P.H. Silverstone. Text courtesy of DANFS. Photo contributed by Robert Hurst.
Almost Unknown330kONE OF OUR GREATEST BATTLESHIPS AT ANCHOR Image and text provided by University of New Mexico.
Photo from Carrizozo News. (Carrizozo, N.M.) 1908-192?, 28 February 1919, Image 2, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 129k Photographed from an airplane, while steaming in line with other battleships, 13 April 1919. Note S.E.5A airplane atop the flying-off platform atop the battleship's second turret. Official USN photo USNHC # NH 59949, now in the collections of the National Archives.
New York Harbor1.78k"American dreadnoughts & super-dreadnoughts steaming into New York harbor 14 April 1919."
The Texas (BB-35) leads the procession with a airplane on her turret catapult. Note the escorting biplane.
The "escorting" aircraft is either a Curtiss HS-1 or HS-2 (note the single engine) can't tell which from the photo. The aircraft on a fly-off platform atop the No. 2 turret of the Texas is 1 of 6 Sopwith Camels purchased from Britain at the end of the war.
The platforms were a British concept designed to provide the fleet with an aircraft capable of reaching the high flying Zeppelins which the German Navy occasionally used as scouts. The Texas was the only US Battleship to be fitted with turret fly-off platforms while in Europe and was the test bed for this program in the US Navy. Not visible in this view is a stripped down (No fabric and no wings) Sopwith 1-1/2 Strutter lashed atop the No. 3 Turret. The platforms were eventually mounted on all 14" gun BB's through the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class (with mixed reviews from their commanders) and carried either a Hanriot HD-1 or a Neiuport 28. Though equipped inflatable floats for water landings, this tended to do a lot of damage not the least of which was dowsing a hot engine in cold salt water. By 1920 a successful compressed air catapult was developed and were being mounted on the aft deck of all 4 turreted battleships and fly-off platforms were removed. The Texas and New York (BB-34), because of their 5 Turrets, lacked the deck space for the catapult and had to make do with a float plane (Vought VE-7) sitting on the aft deck which would be launched by lowering it over the side for a surface take-off.
If you look carefully at the 12th photo from the bottom on the New York 1919-1926 page, you see the VE-7 on the deck and the A-frame hoist used for handling it.
Photo by Paul Thompson.
Text courtesy of N.Y. Times, page 481, from The War of the Nations (New York), 31 December 1919, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
Atlantic  Fleet975kHow the Atlantic Fleet looked to the camera man in a seaplane flying over lower Manhattan a week ago yesterday morning as the mighty armada came up the bay to anchorage in the Hudson off Riverside Drive for a two weeks' vacation after months of strenuous maneuvers in Southern waters. The destroyers Dale (DD-290) and Flusser (DD-289) are shown leading the column of eight dreadnoughts: Oklahoma (BB-37), Nevada (BB-36), Arizona (BB-39), flagship Pennsylvania (BB-38), Utah (BB-31), Florida (BB-30), North Dakota (BB-29) and Delaware (BB-28) past the Statue of Liberty at a fifteen-knot clip. In addition to the big battleships, the fleet includes thirty-two destroyers, numerous supply ships and several submarines.
The Atlantic battleship fleet is home: again. Here are the twelve great first line fighting ships that are paying Father Knickerbocker a two weeks' visit. Over a hundred of Uncle Sam's grim sea warriors gray the North River, while their 30,000 sailor-men are given the freedom of the city in a royal welcome home.
The Battleship Mississippi (BB-41) leading the fleet into the harbor, as photographed from an airplane. Note the airplanes atop the forward and aft turrets.
Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 20 April 1919, Image 48, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico333kMADGE KENNEDY, MOVIE STAR, IS SPONSOR FOR BATTLESHIP NEW MEXICO (BB-40) IN LOAN DRIVE Image and text provided by University of New Mexico.
Photo & text by The Evening Herald. (Albuquerque, N.M.) 1914-1922, 30 April 1919, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico1302kOur Hundred Per Cent Navy Leviathan. Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
PDF courtesy of New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 01 June 1919, Image 83 via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 50k The magnificent sweep of her clipper bow is revealed by a spell in dry dock at the New York Navy Yard in the summer of 1919. Photo taken from Jane's Battleships of the 20th Century, by Bernard Ireland, & contributed by Robert Hurst.
Almost Unknown2.44kPACIFIC FLEET NOW EQUAL IF NOT SUPERIOR TO WHOLE JAPANESE NAVY
Aboard New Mexico (BB-40), Friday, July 25, by Associated Press.
Four dreadnoughts of the Pacific fleet, the New Mexico, Arkansas (BB-33), Texas (BB-35) and New York (BB-34) were lifted successfully through Gatun lock today. This was the first attempt to negotiate the waterway with a fleet of dreadnoughts and tonight the warships lie anchored in fresh water at Gatun lake, 85 feet above sea level. The dreadnoughts will resume their trip toward the Pacific ocean Saturday at which time the Mississippi (BB-41) and the Wyoming (BB-32), both now coaling and oiling at Colon will attempt the passage of the canal. Twenty destroyers went through the canal Thursday passing through the locks in groups of ten. Captain Twining, chief of staff said that the canal had proved its naval value beyond a doubt as dread­naughts may be easily moved from the Atlantic to the Pacific with celerity and without trouble as shown by today's operations. The Pacific fleet will leave Panama for San Diego, Calif. Sunday night.
Image and text provided by State Historical Society of North Dakota.
Photo from The Bismarck Tribune. (Bismarck, N.D.) 1916-current, 26 July 1919, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico900kAboard the New Mexico (BB-40), the first electric ship. Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
PDF courtesy of New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 07 September 1919, Image 71, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
New Mexico 86k Halftone reproduction of a photograph of the New Mexico's (BB-40) officers' Ward Room, with the table set for a meal, 1919. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105048. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
New Mexico 86k Halftone reproduction of a photograph of crew members exercising with her Number Four 5"/51 broadside gun, 1919. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105049. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
New Mexico 81k Halftone reproduction of a photograph of crew members reading and writing in the ship's reception room, 1919. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105050. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
New Mexico 82k Halftone reproduction of a photograph taken in the ship's surgical operating room, 1919. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105051. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
New Mexico 64k Halftone reproduction of a photograph taken in the ship's galley, 1919. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105052. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
New Mexico 64k Halftone reproduction of a photograph showing crew-members scrubbing clothes on the ship's forecastle, 1919. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105053. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
New Mexico 89k Halftone reproduction of a photograph of a band concert held on the ship's quarterdeck, 1919. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105054. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
New Mexico 81k Halftone reproduction of a photograph taken on the ship's fore deck, looking aft on the port side, 1919. Note life rafts attached to turret sides (and one suspended from the forward turret's rangefinder). The text provided on the original print is incorrect. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105055. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
New Mexico 81k Halftone reproduction of a photograph of crew members on the ship's fore deck, with her two forward 14-inch triple gun turrets behind them, 1919. The text provided on the original print is incorrect. The view actually looks aft on the port side, from a position near the anchor capstans. This image was published in 1919 by A.M. Simon, 324 E. 23rd St., New York City, as one of ten photographs in a "Souvenir Folder" of views concerning New Mexico. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 105056. Donation of Edwin C. Finney, Jr., 2007, from the collection of J. Louise Finney.
BB-40 New Mexico 289k The New Mexico (BB-40) on 16 July 1919 became flagship of the newly-organized Pacific Fleet, and three days later sailed for the Panama Canal and San Pedro, Calif., arriving 9 August. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-40 New Mexico 134k New Mexico (BB-40) traverses the Culebra Cut, Panama Canal, 25 July 1919. USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo by The Evening World. (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, 26 July 1919, Final Edition, Image 1, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 89k New Mexico (BB-40) in the middle west chamber, Gatun Locks, Panama Canal, 25 July 1919. Official USN photo USNHC # NH 75719, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico 296k Deck view from the New Mexico (BB-40) in the Panama Canal, 1919. Associated Press photo courtesy of San Francisco Examiner via David S. Smith.
BB-40 New Mexico 3.89k "America's first great Pacific Fleet on its historic journey by way of the Panama Canal to San Francisco where it is to be reviewed by President Wilson in the middle of this month. Leaving Hampton Roads in a majestic procession. Admiral Rodman's flagship, the dreadnought New Mexico (BB-40), appearing in the foreground." Photo by Underwood & Underwood, & text courtesy of N.Y. Times, 3 August 1919, Page 5, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-35 Texas3.90kGiant Dreadnoughts of the New Pacific Fleet through Panama Canal.
The Texas (BB-35) transiting through Gatun Locks on 25 July 1919.
Pictured also are the New Mexico (BB-40), New York (BB-34) & Arkansas (BB-33).
Photo by Times Wide World Service, & text courtesy of N.Y. Times, 17 August 1919, Page 2, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 339k New Mexico (BB-40) and Wyoming (BB-32) passing through Miraflores lock, 8 August 1919. Associated Press text & photo courtesy of San Francisco Examiner via David S. Smith.
BB-40 New Mexico 1.60k Wyoming (BB-32) and the stern of the New Mexico (BB-40) passing through Gatun lock, 8 August 1919. USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
BB-40 New Mexico 257k US Navy Fleet In Panama Canal; (Visit of Panama President, standing, wearing a gray suit and standing on the gangway platform)in Panama Canal aboard the New Mexico (BB-40), 26 July 1919. Associated Press text & photo courtesy of San Francisco Examiner via David S. Smith.
BB-40 New Mexico 201k At the main-truck of the electric marvel floats the four star flag of Admiral Rodman, C & C of the U.S. Pacific Fleet. Associated Press text & photo courtesy of San Francisco Examiner via David S. Smith.
BB-40 New Mexico727kNaval Chief Visits Pacific Fleet.
SECRETARY OP THE NAVY DANIELS boarding the New Mexico (BB-40), flagship of the huge new Pacific fleet, upon its arrival at San Diego, Calif., after successfully passing through the Panama Canal.
Photo by Underwood & Underwood.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 14 August 1919, Final, Image 24, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 789k Looking forward from the aft fighting top of the New Mexico, the flagship of the Pacific Fleet, showing a part of the modern dreadnought's complicated equipment. The ship's garbage incinerator (to the right of the stack) is a novel piece of deck equipment. Times World Wide Photo, text courtesy of N.Y. Times 24 August 1919, Page 6, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Insert Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 August 1919, Image 45, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 51k Twin Billing:
"The Super-dreadnought New Mexico (BB-40), Admiral Rodman's flagship of the new Pacific Fleet, firing the salute of nineteen guns in honor of Secretary Daniels at the first review of the Fleet in Pacific waters."
Secretary of the Navy Daniels and Admiral Rodman, commander of the Pacific Fleet, receiving citizens of San Diego on board the flagship New Mexico.
Times World Wide Photo. Text courtesy of N.Y. Times 24 August 1919, Page 6, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Insert Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 August 1919, Image 46, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico899k Aboard the New Mexico (BB-40), the First Electric Ship
.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 07 September 1919, Image 71, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico643kADMIRAL HUGH RODMAN'S MIGHTY PACIFIC ARMADA REACHES ITS HOME "WATERS"
Four of our new Pacific Fleet's six dreadnoughts on their way up the California coast to San Diego. That city witnessed the greatest naval pageant in its' history when the fleet of nearly 200 ships ended its 5,000-rnile cruise in the harbor. Secretary of the Navy Daniels was the reviewing officer.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 August 1919, Image 43, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 19k "President Wilson, Secretary of the Navy Daniels and others of the reviewing party stand with bare heads while..." Times Wide World Photo Service, text courtesy of N.Y. Times 28 September 1919, Page 7, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 51k ...The super-dreadnought New Mexico (BB-40), flagship of the Pacific Fleet, steamed past with the band playing The Star Spangled Banner.
The new American Pacific Fleet, first great dreadnought squadron on the Pacific coast, making it's historic entry into Seattle Harbor for its first review by the President of the United States."
Times Wide World Photo Service, text courtesy of N.Y. Times 28 September 1919, Page 7, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico648k Three of the four giant propellers that drive the oil-burning New Mexico (BB-40), flagship of the Pacific Fleet, and the first electrically driven battleship in the world. Each propeller is driven by an 8.000 h. p. electric motor. Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 28 September 1919, Page 6, Image 58, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
New Mexico class 157k September 1919. Admiral Hugh Rodman (on the left) Commander, Battleship Division 9, Pacific Fleet, on the Bridge of the New Mexico (BB-40) consulting with her commanding officer Captain Arthur Lee Willard. Image from the Bancroft Library. University of California, Berkeley, courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
BB-40 New Mexico 701k Crew of the New Mexico (BB-40) posed on deck, on large guns. Photo inscription is Long Beach, California. Photo # J239186 U.S. Copyright Office. Digital ID: cph 3c08389 Source: Library of Congress, by C.E. Waterman, Long Beach, Calif. Photo courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
BB-40 New Mexico 2.57k Port side beam of the New Mexico (BB-40) taken at Balboa, the Pacific entrance to the Panama Canal. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-40 New Mexico 210k Two officers gigs and a lighter are moored alongside the New Mexico (BB-40), circa 1919, in San Francisco Bay. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-40 New Mexico 70k Sailor tightens an oil refueling coupling on board, circa 1919. The original caption reads: "Coaling ship holds no terrors for the gobs on the New Mexico (BB-40) as on our latest oil burning types of super dreadnought all that is necessary is to connect the hose and turn on the valve." Official USN photo USNHC # NH 45320, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico50kCaptain Arthur Lee Willard was the commanding officer of the battleship New Mexico (BB-40) from 1919 to 1921. Renewed problems with naval armaments saw Willard assigned as Special Aide for Navy Yards to the Secretary of the Navy in 1921. In this capacity he was in charge of all U.S. Navy industrial plants and shipbuilding on the eastern U.S. coast. In 1930, now holding the rank of Vice Admiral, Willard was assigned as commander of a series of U.S. fleet exercises that validated the increasing importance of aircraft carriers and attacks launched from beyond battleship gun range. These fleet exercises also inspired the creation of a two-ocean Navy in the 1930s by the Roosevelt administration. In 1932 Vice Admiral Willard was chosen to command the Fifth Naval District, a post which he held until retirement shortly before his death on 7 April 1935. He is buried in Arlington National Cemetery. Willard Park, located at Washington Navy Yard, is named in his honor. Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
BB-40 New Mexico498kHoisting a Barge Aboard the New Mexico (BB-40).Photo by American Press Association.
Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo from The Ogden Standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, 12 December 1919, LAST EDITION - 4 P.M., Image 12, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 3.49k "The dreadnought New Mexico (BB-40), flagship of the newly created Pacific Fleet, entering the Golden Gate, San Francisco, in a pathway of equally golden sunlight, as seen from a Navy seaplane in flight nearly a thousand feet above." U.S. Navy official Photo, from Kadel & Herbert, text courtesy of N.Y. Times 21 December 1919, Page 7, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico638kThe Electric Ship, New Mexico (BB-40), from a painting by Walter L. Greene. Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 18 January 1920, page 4, Image 52, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico333kThe New Mexico (BB-40) from the Air
The New Mexico, Pride of the Pacific
Image and text provided by Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records; Phoenix, AZ.
Photo & text by The Coconino Sun. (Flagstaff, Ariz.) 1898-1978, 12 March 1920, Image 14, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico488kU.S. NAVY
Jack's Reading Room
The men's quarters on our new battleships are more luxurious than the Admiral's quarters of fifty years ago. This is a corner in the reading room of the New Mexico (BB-40). A big library and complete file of current magazines, as well as newspapers from all the large cities, help to take care of any stormy hours when Jack may not prefer to be on deck. A good title for this picture would be, "Why boys leave home," and the best part of it is that they come back real men.
Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo & text by The Logan Republican. (Logan, Utah) 1902-1924, 17 April 1920, Image 3, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 186k The New Mexico (BB-40), at Bremerton, Washington, circa 1920. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-40 New Mexico244kLet's Go New Mexico! Image and text provided by University of New Mexico.
Photo & text by The Columbus Weekly Courier. (Columbus, N.M.) 1920-1921, 24 December 1920, Image 2, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-40 New Mexico 435k Shown here about 1920 showing the distinctive bridge of the class, as completed. Wet, hull mounted secondary guns have been removed and the ports plated over. USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.

USS NEW MEXICO BB-40 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry

(Located On The Hazegray & Underway Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)

Crew Contact And Reunion Information

Contact Name: Mr. Vernon Dascher
Address: 3064 DeVilla Tr. Saint Louis, MO, 63301
Phone: 636-949-9413
E-mail: OleVernBB40@yahoo.com


Note About Contacts.

The contact listed, Was the contact at the time for this ship when located. If another person now is the contact, E-mail me and I will update this entry. These contacts are compiled from various sources over a long period of time and may or may not be correct. Every effort has been made to list the newest contact if more than one contact was found.


Additional Resources
Hazegray & Underway Battleship Pages By Andrew Toppan.

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