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NavSource Online: Battleship Photo Archive

BB-41 USS MISSISSIPPI
1915 - 1919

Radio Call Sign: November - Echo - Kilo - Tango

To Additional Pages

1920 - 1930
1931 - 1941
1942 - 1943
1944 - 1945
Post War
Conversion to Gunnery Training Ship - Scrapping


New Mexico Class Battleship: Displacement 32,000 Tons, Dimensions, 624' (oa) x 97' 5" x 31' 1" (Max). Armament 12 x 14"/50 22 x 5"/51, 8 x 3"/50 2 x 21" tt. Armor, 13 1/2" Belt, 18" Turrets, 3 1/2" +2" Decks, 16" Conning Tower. Machinery, 32,000 SHP; Geared Turbines, 4 screws. Speed, 21 Knots, Crew 1084.

Operational and Building Data: Laid down by Newport News, Shipbuilding, Newport News, VA., April 5, 1915. Launched January 25 1917. Commissioned December 18 1917. Reclassified Gunnery Training Ship, AG-128, February 15, 1946. Stricken July 30, 1956. Decommissioned September 17, 1956.
Fate: Sold November 28, 1956 and broken up for scrap.
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BB-41 Mississippi 129k Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels poses with Miss Camelle McBeath of Meridian, Miss. on the launching platform in preparation of naming the new battleship Mississippi (BB-41) on 25 January 1917 at Newport News, Shipbuilding, Newport News, VA. Photo # 06351v from the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
BB-41 140k 25 January 1917 Mississippi (BB-41) launching at Newport News. Miss Camille McBeath, sponsor. Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative, Library of Congress Photo # 06352a courtesy of shorpy.com
Mississippi 337k Mississippi (BB-41) launch reviewing stand at Newport News Shipyard on 25 January 1917. Photo # LC-H261-5837, courtesy of the Library of Congress via Mike Green.
Mississippi 555k 15,000 SEE SUPER-DREADNOUGHT MISSISSIPPI (BB-41) LAUNCHED
The sistership of the battleship Pennsylvania (BB-38) was sent into the water yesterday at Newport News, Va.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo & text by Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 26 January 1917, Night Extra, Image 4, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-41 Mississippi 44k Double insert photo showing the launching of the super-dreadnought Mississippi (BB-41) at Newport News, Shipbuilding, Newport News, VA., 25 January 1917 & Miss Camelle McBeath of Meridian, Miss. who named the new warship and Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels on the Launching Platform beside the Mississippi. Photos by Paul Thompson & IFS; text from the N.Y. Times 4 February 1917, Page 5, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Mississippi 112k Mississippi (BB-41) sliding down the ways at Newport News Shipyard on 25 January 1917. Photo # LC-H261-5512, courtesy of the Library of Congress via Mike Green.
Mississippi 602k Mississippi (BB-41) sliding down the ways at Newport News Shipyard on 25 January 1917. Photo # LC-H261-06228, courtesy of the Library of Congress via Mike Green.
Mississippi 132k LAUNCHING THE GREATEST DREADNOUGHT
The great DREADNOUGHT Mississippi (BB-41), the largest in the U.S. Navy, being launched at Newport News while 20,000 persons cheered and scores of craft of every description welcomed her with shrill blasts of their whistles. Miss Camille McBeath of Meridian, Miss.crashed a gaily decorated bottle of champagne against the vessel's bow.
Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE.
Photo from The North Platte Semi-Weekly Tribune.(North Platte, Neb.) 1895-1922, 09 February 1917, Image 3,via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Mississippi 604k New battleship Mississippi (BB-41) will be one of the world's mightiest ships. Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH.
Photo from The Democratic Banner. (Mt. Vernon, Ohio) 1898-192?, 26 January 1917, Image 1,via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Guns 1.10k "U.S. Navy Yard, Washington. Sight shop, big gun section. 1917: Possible future armament for the New Mexico (BB-40 /42) class . Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative, Library of Congress Photo courtesy of shorpy.com
Mississippi393kGETTING PART OF OUR SEA FORCES IN READINESS
All of Uncle Sam's naval bases are scenes of the greatest fitted out with guns and equipment and army transport being activity at present. Here is an unusual photograph of the Norfolk Navy Yard. It shows one of the new battleships which is being fitted out with guns and equipment and army transports being fitted out to carry unfits of our new national army to the fighting lines in France.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 03 July 1917, Image 7,via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-41 Mississippi 134k As completed in her original form. She is shown here on 7 August 1917 being assisted by tugs away from the dock at Newport News presumably for acceptance trials. She was commissioned on 18 December 1917. Of the three New Mexico class ships, only the Mississippi (BB-41) was fitted with all twenty two of the designed 5" guns. USN photo.
BB-41 Mississippi 117k Captain William Adger Moffett was the commanding officer of the battleship Mississippi (BB-41) from 10 December 1918 to 7 December 1920. He supported the creation of a scout plane unit on the ship. Although not himself a flyer, Moffett became known as the "Air Admiral" for his leadership of the Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics from its creation in 1921. In this role, he oversaw the development of tactics for naval aircraft, the introduction of the aircraft carrier, and relations with the civilian aircraft industry. Photo from the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
Mississippi 619k E stands for early in the Mississippi's (BB-41) career in this circa 1918 photo. U.S. Navy Photograph courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Mississippi 1.23k NEW YORK MARVELS AT THE COLOSSAL NEW MISSISSIPPI (BB-41)
New United States DREADNOUGHT, photographed as she lies at anchor in the Hudson, awaiting the arrival of the overseas fleet for the Christmas review.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 December 1918, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-41 Mississippi 92k Mississippi (BB-41) anchored off New York City for the Victory Fleet Review, 25 December 1918. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, USNHC # NH 46047, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.
BB-41 Mississippi 195k In April 1918 Mississippi (BB-41) returned to Hampton Roads and cruised between Boston and New York until departing for winter maneuvers in the Caribbean 31 January 1919. She is pictured here anchored in New York City's waterways sometime between those two dates, probably for the Victory Fleet Review, 25 December 1918. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri. Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-41 Mississippi 331k Sopwith Camel taking off from a wooden flight deck constructed on the Mississippi (BB-41) on 6 April 1919. The operation of wheeled aircraft from decks like this led the United States Navy into aircraft carrier development. US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 2001.161.001.
New York Harbor46k"American dreadnoughts & super-dreadnoughts steaming into New York harbor 14 April 1919."
The Texas (BB-35) leads the procession with a airplane on her turret catapult. Note the escorting biplane.
The "escorting" aircraft is either a Curtiss HS-1 or HS-2 (note the single engine) can't tell which from the photo. The aircraft on a fly-off platform atop the No. 2 turret of the Texas is 1 of 6 Sopwith Camels purchased from Britain at the end of the war.
The platforms were a British concept designed to provide the fleet with an aircraft capable of reaching the high flying Zeppelins which the German Navy occasionally used as scouts. The Texas was the only US Battleship to be fitted with turret fly-off platforms while in Europe and was the test bed for this program in the US Navy. Not visible in this view is a stripped down (No fabric and no wings) Sopwith 1-1/2 Strutter lashed atop the No. 3 Turret. The platforms were eventually mounted on all 14" gun BB's through the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class (with mixed reviews from their commanders) and carried either a Hanriot HD-1 or a Neiuport 28. Though equipped inflatable floats for water landings, this tended to do a lot of damage not the least of which was dowsing a hot engine in cold salt water. By 1920 a successful compressed air catapult was developed and were being mounted on the aft deck of all 4 turreted battleships and fly-off platforms were removed. The Texas and New York (BB-34), because of their 5 Turrets, lacked the deck space for the catapult and had to make do with a float plane (Vought VE-7) sitting on the aft deck which would be launched by lowering it over the side for a surface take-off.
If you look carefully at the 12th photo from the bottom on the New York 1919 - 1926 page, you see the VE-7 on the deck and the A-frame hoist used for handling it.
Photo by Paul Thompson; text courtesy of N.Y. Times 31 December 1919, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
Atlantic  Fleet975kHow the Atlantic Fleet looked to the camera man in a seaplane flying over lower Manhattan a week ago yesterday morning as the mighty armada came up the bay to anchorage in the Hudson off Riverside Drive for a two weeks' vacation after months of strenuous maneuvers in Southern waters. The destroyers Dale (DD-290) and Flusser (DD-289) are shown leading the column of eight dreadnoughts: Oklahoma (BB-37), Nevada (BB-36), Arizona (BB-39), flagship Pennsylvania (BB-38), Utah (BB-31), Florida (BB-30), North Dakota (BB-29) and Delaware (BB-28) past the Statue of Liberty at a fifteen-knot clip. In addition to the big battleships, the fleet includes thirty-two destroyers, numerous supply ships and several submarines.
The Atlantic battleship fleet is home: again. Here are the twelve great first line fighting ships that are paying Father Knickerbocker a two weeks' visit. Over a hundred of Uncle Sam's grim sea warriors gray the North River, while their 30,000 sailor-men are given the freedom of the city in a royal welcome home.
The Battleship Mississippi (BB-41) leading the fleet into the harbor, as photographed from an airplane. Note the airplanes atop the forward and aft turrets.
Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 20 April 1919, Image 48, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-41 Mississippi 89k 1919 photo of the ship on the Hudson River showing that the hull mounted guns have been removed and their ports plated over. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 60653.
BB-41 Mississippi 421k 1919 stern view of the Mississippi (BB-41) transiting the Panama Canal. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-41 Mississippi 434k Photo entitled PACIFIC FLEET THROUGH PANAMA CANAL
Mississippi (BB-41) in east chamber Pedro Miguel Lock, the Panama Canal. 26 July 1919.
Note the biplane on the top turret.
US Navy photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-41 Mississippi 488k A U.S. Navy Hanriot HD-1 taking off from a platform over the gun turret aboard the battleship Mississippi (BB-41) in 1919. Photo from Bowers Collection, courtesy of Mike Green.
Photo added 08/10/14.
BB-41 Mississippi 336k A Hanriot HD-1 visible on a wooden deck constructed atop an aft turret on the Mississippi (BB-41) in 1919. Surplus foreign built aircraft were used in 1919 to evaluate the operation of wheeled aircraft on board ships. These experiments led to the development of aircraft carriers in the U.S. Navy. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command, Photo No. 1996.253.7223 via Mike Green.
BB-41 Mississippi 396k An aviator assigned to the Fleet Air Detachment, Atlantic Fleet, pictured in the cockpit of a Sopwith Camel prior to launching from Mississippi (BB-41) during winter maneuvers at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, in 1919. Surplus aircraft obtained by the U.S. Navy following World War I, Camels were used in shipboard experiments operating aircraft from battleships. US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 2001.161.007.
BB-41 Mississippi 858k A Hanoit HD-1 on the Mississippi (BB-41) in 1919. The photo shows the details of the wooden decks constructed atop gun turrets to evaluate the use of wheeled aircraft on board ships. The necessity to rotate the turret during flight operations is illustrated with the cables and flag staff blocking any launching directly over the stern. US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No.1996.253.7223.007. via Mike Green.
Mississippi 294k The giant battleship Mississippi (BB-41) is here shown in the drydock at Hunters Point, CA., for repairs. US Navy photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Mississippi 586k Men Appear Like Pigmies Alongside Giant Battleship in Drydock
The giant battleship Mississippi (BB-41) is here shown in the drydock at Hunters Point, CA., for repairs. Hoisting a monster of such size clear of the water is mean job as may be guessed.
The third Mississippi has a thousand times the destructive fire power of the first, which was Dewey's ship in the capture of New Orleans by Admiral Farragut.
Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 10 October 1919, FINAL EDITION, Image 14, & New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 12 October 1919, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet1.37k80-Foot Diving Is Great Sport for This "Tar"
Speedy, famous high diver of the circus and county fair circuits, had nothing on this jolly jack tar, member,of the crew of the Mississippi (BB-41, now in Pacific waters. Speedy did his high dive as a matter of business, while this Jackie takes a header from one of the big cranes of the battleship, eighty feet in the air. The only feature he says he does not like is climbing back to the top of the crane after his dive.
Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 16 November 1919, FINAL EDITION, SECTION TWO, Image 17, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-41 Mississippi 243k Mississippi (BB-41) wearing what looks like a camouflage pattern of triangular flags painted across the length of the ship. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-41 Mississippi 74k 1919 photo of the Mississippi (BB-41) underway with elements of the Atlantic fleet. USN photo.

USS MISSISSIPPI BB-41 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry
(Located On The Hazegray & Underway Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)

Crew Contact And Reunion Information
USS Mississippi ARG-128

Contact Name: Mr. Jack Hefferman
Address: 163 Shawn's Hideaway, Millsboro, DE, 19966
Phone: 302-947-1896
E-mail: None


Note About Contacts.

The contact listed, Was the contact at the time for this ship when located. If another person now is the contact, E-mail me and I will update this entry. These contacts are compiled from various sources over a long period of time and may or may not be correct. Every effort has been made to list the newest contact if more than one contact was found.


Additional Resources
Hazegray & Underway Battleship Pages By Andrew Toppan.

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