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NavSource Online: Battleship Photo Archive

BB-41 USS MISSISSIPPI

Radio Call Sign: November - Echo - Kilo - Tango


New Mexico Class Battleship: Displacement 32,000 Tons, Dimensions, 624' (oa) x 97' 5" x 31' 1" (Max). Armament 12 x 14"/50 22 x 5"/51, 8 x 3"/50 2 x 21" tt. Armor, 13 1/2" Belt, 18" Turrets, 3 1/2" +2" Decks, 16" Conning Tower. Machinery, 32,000 SHP; Geared Turbines, 4 screws. Speed, 21 Knots, Crew 1084.

Operational and Building Data: Laid down by Newport News, Shipbuilding, Newport News, VA., April 5, 1915. Launched January 25 1917. Commissioned December 18 1917. Reclassified Gunnery Training Ship, AG-128, February 15, 1946. Stricken July 30, 1956. Decommissioned September 17, 1956.
Fate: Sold November 28, 1956 and broken up for scrap.
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Keel Laying / Commissioning
1915 - 1917

BB-41 Mississippi 129k Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels poses with Miss Camelle McBeath of Meridian, Miss. on the launching platform in preparation of naming the new battleship Mississippi (BB-41) on 25 January 1917 at Newport News, Shipbuilding, Newport News, VA. Photo # 06351v from the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
BB-41 Mississippi 271k Miss Camelle McBeath of Meridian, Miss. & her launching party pose on the launching platform in preparation of naming the new battleship Mississippi (BB-41) on 25 January 1917 at Newport News, Shipbuilding, Newport News, VA. Photo from the Library of Congress via Ron Reeves.
BB-41 140k 25 January 1917 Mississippi (BB-41) launching at Newport News. Miss Camille McBeath, sponsor. Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative, Library of Congress Photo # 06352a courtesy of shorpy.com
Mississippi 337k Mississippi (BB-41) launch reviewing stand at Newport News Shipyard on 25 January 1917. Photo # LC-H261-5837, courtesy of the Library of Congress via Mike Green.
Mississippi 555k 15,000 SEE SUPER-DREADNOUGHT MISSISSIPPI (BB-41) LAUNCHED
The sistership of the battleship Pennsylvania (BB-38) was sent into the water yesterday at Newport News, Va.
Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo & text by Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 26 January 1917, Night Extra, Image 4, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-41 Mississippi 44k Double insert photo showing the launching of the super-dreadnought Mississippi (BB-41) at Newport News, Shipbuilding, Newport News, VA., 25 January 1917 & Miss Camelle McBeath of Meridian, Miss. who named the new warship and Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels on the Launching Platform beside the Mississippi. Photos by Paul Thompson & IFS; text from the N.Y. Times 4 February 1917, Page 5, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Mississippi 112k Mississippi (BB-41) sliding down the ways at Newport News Shipyard on 25 January 1917. Photo # LC-H261-5512 & LC-H261-06228 (insert) courtesy of the Library of Congress via Mike Green.
Mississippi 132k LAUNCHING THE GREATEST DREADNOUGHT
The great DREADNOUGHT Mississippi (BB-41), the largest in the U.S. Navy, being launched at Newport News while 20,000 persons cheered and scores of craft of every description welcomed her with shrill blasts of their whistles. Miss Camille McBeath of Meridian, Miss.crashed a gaily decorated bottle of champagne against the vessel's bow.
Image and text provided by University of Nebraska-Lincoln Libraries, Lincoln, NE.
Photo from The North Platte Semi-Weekly Tribune.(North Platte, Neb.) 1895-1922, 09 February 1917, Image 3,via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Mississippi 604k New battleship Mississippi (BB-41) will be one of the world's mightiest ships. Image and text provided by Ohio Historical Society, Columbus, OH.
Photo from The Democratic Banner. (Mt. Vernon, Ohio) 1898-192?, 26 January 1917, Image 1,via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Guns 1.10k "U.S. Navy Yard, Washington. Sight shop, big gun section. 1917: Possible future armament for the New Mexico (BB-40 /42) class . Harris & Ewing Collection glass negative, Library of Congress Photo courtesy of shorpy.com
Mississippi393kGETTING PART OF OUR SEA FORCES IN READINESS
All of Uncle Sam's naval bases are scenes of the greatest fitted out with guns and equipment and army transport being activity at present. Here is an unusual photograph of the Norfolk Navy Yard. It shows one of the new battleships which is being fitted out with guns and equipment and army transports being fitted out to carry unfits of our new national army to the fighting lines in France.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo from The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 03 July 1917, Image 7,via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-41 Mississippi 434k As completed in her original form. She is shown on 7 August 1917 being assisted by tugs away from the dock at Newport News presumably for acceptance trials. She was commissioned on 18 December 1917. Of the three New Mexico class ships, only the Mississippi (BB-41) was fitted with all twenty two of the designed 5" guns. USN photo # 19-N-11860 from National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-41 Mississippi 485k Port bow view, 2 October 1917. USN photo # 19-N-1993 from National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
1918 - 1933
BB-41 Mississippi 117k Captain William Adger Moffett was the commanding officer of the battleship Mississippi (BB-41) from 10 December 1918 to 7 December 1920. He supported the creation of a scout plane unit on the ship. Although not himself a flyer, Moffett became known as the "Air Admiral" for his leadership of the Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics from its creation in 1921. In this role, he oversaw the development of tactics for naval aircraft, the introduction of the aircraft carrier, and relations with the civilian aircraft industry. Photo from the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
Mississippi 619k E stands for early in the Mississippi's (BB-41) career in this circa 1918 photo. USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Mississippi 1.23k NEW YORK MARVELS AT THE COLOSSAL NEW MISSISSIPPI (BB-41)
New United States DREADNOUGHT, photographed as she lies at anchor in the Hudson, awaiting the arrival of the overseas fleet for the Christmas review.
Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 December 1918, Image 3, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-41 Mississippi 92k Mississippi (BB-41) anchored off New York City for the Victory Fleet Review, 25 December 1918. Official USN photo USNHC # NH 46047, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.
BB-41 Mississippi 195k In April 1918 Mississippi (BB-41) returned to Hampton Roads and cruised between Boston and New York until departing for winter maneuvers in the Caribbean 31 January 1919. She is pictured here anchored in New York City's waterways sometime between those two dates, probably for the Victory Fleet Review, 25 December 1918. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri. Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-41 Mississippi 331k Sopwith Camel taking off from a wooden flight deck constructed on the Mississippi (BB-41) on 6 April 1919. The operation of wheeled aircraft from decks like this led the United States Navy into aircraft carrier development. US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 2001.161.001.
New York Harbor1.78k"American dreadnoughts & super-dreadnoughts steaming into New York harbor 14 April 1919."
The Texas (BB-35) leads the procession with a airplane on her turret catapult. Note the escorting biplane.
The "escorting" aircraft is either a Curtiss HS-1 or HS-2 (note the single engine) can't tell which from the photo. The aircraft on a fly-off platform atop the No. 2 turret of the Texas is 1 of 6 Sopwith Camels purchased from Britain at the end of the war.
The platforms were a British concept designed to provide the fleet with an aircraft capable of reaching the high flying Zeppelins which the German Navy occasionally used as scouts. The Texas was the only US Battleship to be fitted with turret fly-off platforms while in Europe and was the test bed for this program in the US Navy. Not visible in this view is a stripped down (No fabric and no wings) Sopwith 1-1/2 Strutter lashed atop the No. 3 Turret. The platforms were eventually mounted on all 14" gun BB's through the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class (with mixed reviews from their commanders) and carried either a Hanriot HD-1 or a Neiuport 28. Though equipped inflatable floats for water landings, this tended to do a lot of damage not the least of which was dowsing a hot engine in cold salt water. By 1920 a successful compressed air catapult was developed and were being mounted on the aft deck of all 4 turreted battleships and fly-off platforms were removed. The Texas and New York (BB-34), because of their 5 Turrets, lacked the deck space for the catapult and had to make do with a float plane (Vought VE-7) sitting on the aft deck which would be launched by lowering it over the side for a surface take-off.
If you look carefully at the photo you see the VE-7 on the deck and the A-frame hoist used for handling it.
Photo by Paul Thompson; text courtesy of N.Y. Times 31 December 1919, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
Atlantic  Fleet975kHow the Atlantic Fleet looked to the camera man in a seaplane flying over lower Manhattan a week ago yesterday morning as the mighty armada came up the bay to anchorage in the Hudson off Riverside Drive for a two weeks' vacation after months of strenuous maneuvers in Southern waters. The destroyers Dale (DD-290) and Flusser (DD-289) are shown leading the column of eight dreadnoughts: Oklahoma (BB-37), Nevada (BB-36), Arizona (BB-39), flagship Pennsylvania (BB-38), Utah (BB-31), Florida (BB-30), North Dakota (BB-29) and Delaware (BB-28) past the Statue of Liberty at a fifteen-knot clip. In addition to the big battleships, the fleet includes thirty-two destroyers, numerous supply ships and several submarines.
The Atlantic battleship fleet is home: again. Here are the twelve great first line fighting ships that are paying Father Knickerbocker a two weeks' visit. Over a hundred of Uncle Sam's grim sea warriors gray the North River, while their 30,000 sailor-men are given the freedom of the city in a royal welcome home.
The Battleship Mississippi (BB-41) leading the fleet into the harbor, as photographed from an airplane. Note the airplanes atop the forward and aft turrets.
Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 20 April 1919, Image 48, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-41 Mississippi 89k 1919 photo of the ship on the Hudson River showing that the hull mounted guns have been removed and their ports plated over. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 60653.
BB-41 Mississippi 421k 1919 stern view of the Mississippi (BB-41) transiting the Panama Canal. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-41 Mississippi 434k Photo entitled PACIFIC FLEET THROUGH PANAMA CANAL
Mississippi (BB-41) in east chamber Pedro Miguel Lock, the Panama Canal. 26 July 1919.
Note the biplane on the top turret.
USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-41 Mississippi 488k A U.S. Navy Hanriot HD-1 taking off from a platform over the gun turret aboard the battleship Mississippi (BB-41) after conversion from the standard float-plane form as first supplied. Photo i.d. courtesy of Manolis Andreou & Alan Moore.
Photo from Bowers Collection, courtesy of Mike Green & Chris Hoehn.
BB-41 Mississippi 858k A Hanriot HD-1 on the Mississippi (BB-41) in 1919. The photo shows the details of the wooden decks constructed atop gun turrets to evaluate the use of wheeled aircraft on board ships. The necessity to rotate the turret during flight operations is illustrated with the cables and flag staff blocking any launching directly over the stern. Photo i.d. courtesy of Manolis Andreou.
US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No.1996.253.7223.007. via Mike Green.
BB-41 Mississippi 336k A Hanriot HD-1 visible on a wooden deck constructed atop an aft turret on the Mississippi (BB-41) in 1919. Surplus foreign built aircraft were used in 1919 to evaluate the operation of wheeled aircraft on board ships. These experiments led to the development of aircraft carriers in the U.S. Navy. U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command, Photo No. 1996.253.7223 via Mike Green.
BB-41 Mississippi 396k An aviator assigned to the Fleet Air Detachment, Atlantic Fleet, pictured in the cockpit of a Sopwith Camel prior to launching from Mississippi (BB-41) during winter maneuvers at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, in 1919. Surplus aircraft obtained by the U.S. Navy following World War I, Camels were used in shipboard experiments operating aircraft from battleships. US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, Photo No. 2001.161.007.
Mississippi 294k The giant battleship Mississippi (BB-41) is here shown in the drydock at Hunters Point, CA., for repairs. USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Mississippi 586k Men Appear Like Pigmies Alongside Giant Battleship in Drydock
The giant battleship Mississippi (BB-41) is here shown in the drydock at Hunters Point, CA., for repairs. Hoisting a monster of such size clear of the water is mean job as may be guessed.
The third Mississippi has a thousand times the destructive fire power of the first, which was Dewey's ship in the capture of New Orleans by Admiral Farragut.
Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 10 October 1919, FINAL EDITION, Image 14, & New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 12 October 1919, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Atlantic  Fleet1.37k80-Foot Diving Is Great Sport for This "Tar"
Speedy, famous high diver of the circus and county fair circuits, had nothing on this jolly jack tar, member,of the crew of the Mississippi (BB-41, now in Pacific waters. Speedy did his high dive as a matter of business, while this Jackie takes a header from one of the big cranes of the battleship, eighty feet in the air. The only feature he says he does not like is climbing back to the top of the crane after his dive.
Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo & text by The Washington Times. (Washington [D.C.]) 1902-1939, 16 November 1919, FINAL EDITION, SECTION TWO, Image 17, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-41 Mississippi 243k Mississippi (BB-41) wearing what looks like a camouflage pattern of triangular flags painted across the length of the ship. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-41 Mississippi 74k 1919 photo of the Mississippi (BB-41) underway with elements of the Atlantic fleet. USN photo.
BB-41 Mississippi 58k Mississippi (BB-41), about 1920, as completed, line drawing by A.L. Raven. Photo and text courtesy of U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
BB-41 Mississippi 21k Sailors on-board the Mississippi (BB-41) render aid to a seal on board. She had an injured flipper and they healed her up and she followed the ship for some time. Photo circa late teen's - early 20's. Photo from collection of crew member Reynold Oberg, submitted courtesy of his granddaughter Sherry Witt.
BB-41 Mississippi 27k Mississippi's (BB-41) mascots helped pass along the long spells of sea time. Photo circa late teen's - early 20's. Photo from collection of crew member Reynold Oberg, submitted courtesy of his granddaughter Sherry Witt.
BB-41 Mississippi 26k Mississippi's (BB-41) mascots helped pass along the long spells of sea time. Photo circa late teen's - early 20's. Photo from collection of crew member Reynold Oberg, submitted courtesy of his granddaughter Sherry Witt.
BB-41 Mississippi 97k Electrical Division of the Mississippi (BB-41). Photo circa late teen's - early 20's. Photo from collection of crew member Reynold Oberg, submitted courtesy of his granddaughter Sherry Witt.
BB-41 Mississippi 144k Arizona (BB-39) firing a salvo of 14" guns. Picture from the bridge of the Mississippi (BB-41). Photo circa late teen's - early 20's. Photo from collection of crewmember Reynold Oberg, submitted courtesy of his granddaughter Sherry Witt.
BB-41 Mississippi 130k Note on the back of the photo says "21 inch torpedo. Would blow Ogeden off the map if placed on Main Street and it exploded." ("Ogden" is the small Iowa town he was from.) Photo from collection of crew member Reynold Oberg, submitted courtesy of his granddaughter Sherry Witt.
BB-41 Mississippi 84k "Our scouting plane on catapult." This photo is part of the D. Sheley's photostream @ flickr.com and submitted courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi 223k Mississippi (BB-41) underway off San Pedro, California, in 1921. The The Wickes-class destroyer Aaron Ward (DD-132) is visible in the background. Photo courtesy of U.S. Navy National Museum of Naval Aviation, photo No. 2004.042.056 1921, courtesy of Robert Hurst.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
BB-41 Mississippi 63k Seaman 2nd Class James Brown on board Mississippi (BB-41) posing beside one of her 22 x 5"/51 guns. This photo is part of the D. Sheley's photostream @ flickr.com and submitted courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi 270kMississippi (BB-41) operating off Panama, circa 1923. USNHC # NH 100503, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.
BB-28 Delaware819kPanoramic photo of the U.S. fleet in Panama Bay (Pacific entrance to the Panama Canal) on 1 March 1923. 70 vessels are viewed; the Battle Fleet consists of all U.S. battleships from the Delaware (BB-28) through the Idaho (BB-42). Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, courtesy of Tom Kermen. Copyright R.G. Lewis, Y Photo Shop, Balboa, C.Z."
BB-41 Mississippi 681k During gunnery practice on 12 June 1924 off San Pedro, 48 of Mississippi's (BB-41) crew were asphyxiated as a result of an explosion in her No. 2 main battery turret.
This photo and the photo below appeared in the 12 June 2004 edition of the San Pedro Daily Breeze.
Photo courtesy of Irv Jacobs via Ron Reeves.
BB-41 Mississippi 390k Funeral for the 48 of Mississippi's (BB-41) crew at San Pedro's Troma Field on 12 June 1924. Photo courtesy of Irv Jacobs via Ron Reeves.
BB-41 Mississippi 84k Mississippi (BB-41) in Australian waters, 1925. This photo is part of the Australian National Maritime Museumís Samuel J. Hood Studio Collection in Flicker.
Sam Hood (1870-1956) was a Sydney photographer with a passion for ships. His 72-year career spanned the romantic age of sail and two world wars. The photos in the collection were taken mainly in Sydney and Newcastle during the first half of the 20th century.
Photo courtesy of Pieter Bakkels.
BB-41 Mississippi 409k Mississippi (BB-41) at anchor.
The markings on the superfiring turrets were typical of USN BBs from about 1918 up to the mid-20s, and were something we got out of operating with the Grand Fleet during 1918 (The Brits had them, too). In conjunction with concentration dials ("range clocks") on the masts, they allowed a ship to see the range and bearing of targets being engaged by the ships immediately ahead and astern, in circumstances where one's own ship couldn't see a target ... a not uncommon problem in the nasty North Sea weather, but a rare one in the nice, clear conditions typical of the Caribbean and the Pacific, where the USN tended to hang out after the war. Why Uncle Sam's Navy kept them for as long as they did totally escapes me, but it must have seemed like a good idea at the time. The RN appears to have stopped using them pretty quickly after the end of WWI.
High Resolution photo.
Photo courtesy of Roger Rigby.
Text courtesy Chuck Haberlein.
BB-41 Mississippi 4.40k Mississippi (BB-41) showing two aircraft, one a bi-plane right on the stern and the other a big twin-float monoplane (which I think was a Martin MO-1) atop Turret # 3 turret during her 1925 visit with the US fleet to Australia. Photo courtesy of Roger Rigby.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Chuck Haberlein & Richard M. Jensen.
BB-41 Mississippi 322k Mississippi's (BB-41) catapult sports 2 planes on her upper rear turret.
Note the target practice sheet near the crane.
USN photo # 19-N-10329 from National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-41 Mississippi 402k 3 battleships coming through Sydney Heads, South Head Light on the left, the crowd is standing on North Head. As can be seen the channel curves to the north in order to avoid 'Pig & Sow Reef'.
High Resolution photo.
Read about the fleet's visit here in this 8 page PDF of various newspaper articles.
Photo courtesy of Roger Rigby.
BB-45 Colorado106kThe United States Battle Fleet steaming in column off the California coast during the middle or later 1920s. The three leading ships are (in no particular order) Colorado (BB-45), Maryland (BB-46) and West Virginia (BB-48) followed by Tennessee (BB-43) and three older battleships. Photograph taken from California (BB-44).Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-695093, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-41 Mississippi 572kOn 23 July 1925, Sydney hosted eight of the U.S. Navy Battle Fleet's largest ships, including California (BB-44), Colorado, Tennessee (BB-43), Maryland (BB-46), West Virginia (BB-48), New Mexico (BB-40), Mississippi (BB-41) and Idaho (BB-42) . This is the Mississippi, anchored in Sydney Harbour. This photo is part of the Australian National Maritime Museumís Samuel J. Hood Studio Collection in Flicker.
Sam Hood (1870-1956) was a Sydney photographer with a passion for ships. His 72-year career spanned the romantic age of sail and two world wars. The photos in the collection were taken mainly in Sydney and Newcastle during the first half of the 20th century and submitted via Bill Gonyo.
Sam Hood 37k Night time stern view of the Tennessee (BB-43), Mississippi (BB-41), California (BB-44) and or Idaho (BB-42) in Port Jackson, Sydney, Australia, 1925. This photo is part of the Australian National Maritime Museumís Samuel J. Hood Studio Collection in Flicker.
Sam Hood (1870-1956) was a Sydney photographer with a passion for ships. His 72-year career spanned the romantic age of sail and two world wars. The photos in the collection were taken mainly in Sydney and Newcastle during the first half of the 20th century.
Photo courtesy of Pieter Bakkels.
Southern Cruise90kView from the deck of a one of the battleships looking aft of the Battle Fleet and a division of cruisers from the Scouting Fleet cruise to Australia and New Zealand. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-40 New Mexico 2.44k Langley (CV-1) with Vought VE-7 aircraft on deck, at anchor off Culebra Island, Puerto Rico on 18 March 1926. In the background are 4 four-stack destroyers and a Tennessee class (BB-43 /44) battleship on the left, and two New Mexico (BB-40 /42) class battleships (center and right).
At the time, the Tennessee's are hard to tell apart. A few years later, Tennessee (BB-43) had the open bridge added around her pilothouse, and even later, California (BB-44) added the enlarged flag bridge. But in the 1922 (or so) period, they were close in config.
The New Mexico's appear to be Mississippi (BB-41) on the left (or in the center) and New Mexico (BB-40) (nearly bow-on) on the right.
The original photo was labeled "Harbinger" to show symbolically how the unimposing Langley was the first of a line of ships which eventually drove the battleship from its primary place into the background.
Photo i.d. & text in italics courtesy of Richard Jensen.
USN photo via collections.naval.aviation.museum.
Almost Unknown709kDifferent angle of the above photo: Langley (CV-1) & Battleships at anchor off Culebra Island, Puerto Rico 18 March 1926.USN photo NARA II 80-G-185902 via courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-45 Colorado54kThe photo here might be on the same occasion as the above, but from a different angle. Then again maybe not. It was taken off a 16mm film. Official USN photo courtesy of periscopefilm.com.
Battlefleet44kThe U.S. battle-fleet framed through a porthole. It was taken off a 16mm film. Photo might be from the same sequence as above.Official USN photo courtesy of periscopefilm.com.
BB-41 Mississippi 2.43k The 4th of June 1927 found the Mississippi (BB-41) being photographed.USN photo # 19-N-11006 from National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-41 Mississippi 279kNo catapult's on Mississippi's (BB-41) rear turrets in this circa 1929 photo. Photo possibly by Frank Lynch, chief photographer of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, circa 1929.
Photo from the collection of Carrie Schmidt.
BB-41 Mississippi 512k Broadside view of the Mississippi (BB-41) before modernization. Photo courtesy of Jerry Lem.
BB-41 Mississippi 1.90k The small (in width) pilot house sitting low behind the conning tower. New Mexico's (BB-40) is the same width but is raised above the roof of the conning tower. Text & photo i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
Photo possibly by Frank Lynch, chief photographer of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, circa 1929.
Photo from the collection of Carrie Schmidt.
BB-41 Mississippi 477k The 3 sisters of the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class
1st is New Mexico (BB-40) (pilot house above conning tower). 2nd is Idaho (BB-42) (pilothouse is wider), 3rd is Mississippi (BB-41) (by default).
The 2 photos appear to be in sequence though one of them is printed with the negative reversed. The far shore line and the ships in the background beyond the last BB appear to be the same except for what is revealed or concealed by the forward progress of the ships.
Text & photo i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
Photo possibly by Frank Lynch, chief photographer of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer, circa 1929.
Photo from the collection of Carrie Schmidt.
Battlefleet122kWatercolor of a Presidential review during President Hoover's term of office, 1928-32.
Crews line the rails of a Colorado class (BB-45 / 48) battleship as the ships pass in line astern of the reviewing stand with the airship Los Angeles (ZR-3) piercing the clouds accompanied by 9 biplanes.
Courtesy of Michael Schwarz.
Battlefleet56kView of the U.S. Battlefleet from above, possibly from the airship Los Angeles (ZR-3). Photo courtesy of periscopefilm.com.
BB-41 Mississippi 21k Mississippi (BB-41) at Pedro with observation balloon in tow. Date unknown. Jon Burdett
BB-41 Mississippi 155k Mississippi (BB-41) while with the Pacific fleet, circa 1930 before modernization at Norfolk Navy Yard 30 March 1931.
Note that she has an "E" for excellence painted on her smoke stack. Unfortunately DANFS doesn't mention any awards during this period in her history.
Photo courtesy of Manuel Tafoya Sr.
BB-41 Mississippi 91k The national ensign flies from Mississippi's (BB-41) stern in this circa 1930 photo while with the Pacific fleet. She is probably anchored at San Pedro. Note the life rafts attached to her turrets. Photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-41 Mississippi 348k Port side view of the rebuilt Mississippi (BB-41) at anchor in late 1932. In addition to the engineering, machinery, armor and superstructure improvements, the main battery gun elevation was raised from 15 to 35 degrees for increased range. #4 turret shows the rifles at 35 degrees. USN photo # 19-N-14709 from National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-40 New Mexico 88k Four photos for the 1933 400 KW Turbine Gear Generator Sets for the battleships:
New Mexico (BB-40), Mississippi (BB-41), Idaho (BB-42), Tennessee (BB-43) & Colorado (BB-45).
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 5
Figure 4
Photos courtesy of Ed Zajkowski.
BB-40 New Mexico 2.06k Mississippi (BB-41) entered Norfolk Navy Yard 30 March 1931 for a modernization overhaul, departing once again on training exercises in September 1933.
Mississippi appears here on 12 May 1933.
Among the ships moored near the Mississippi are the Bridgeport (AD-10) (painted white, with single stack), immediately behind the Mississippi and the destroyer Childs (DD-241), being nudged by a tug.
Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Aryeh Wetherhorn & Gary Priolo.
Photo from the Robert J. Lewis collection, courtesy of Butch & Debbie Baxter.
BB-40 New Mexico 3.23k Mississippi (BB-41) at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, VA., 12 May 1933.
The bow of the destroyer Childs (DD-241) appears on the left, with the destroyer King (DD-242) moored ahead.
Photo Yanovitch, from the Robert J. Lewis collection, courtesy of Butch & Debbie Baxter.
BB-40 New Mexico 3.50k Mississippi (BB-41) at Norfolk Naval Shipyard, Portsmouth, VA., 12 May 1933.
Marine Guard salutes the flag.
Photo Yanovitch, from the Robert J. Lewis collection, courtesy of Butch & Debbie Baxter.
BB-41 Mississippi 108k Bow on view of the Mississippi (BB-41) undergoing modernization at Norfolk Navy Yard, April 1933. Her main guns and superstructure have been completely removed. National Archives photo (NARA) # 18089 submitted by Joe MacDonald.
1934 - Pre-Pearl Harbor Attack
Mississippi 196k A photo taken since the modernization of the Mississippi (BB-41). USN photo courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
Mississippi 369k Coming out (depending on the direction) for the Mississippi (BB-41). USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-41 Mississippi 435k Mississippi (BB-41) in a Pacific port. The date would have to be between Mississippi's recommissioning (post modernization), September '33, and mid 1936. Mississippi still lacks the MK-28 AA directors and Lexington (CV-2) does not yet have the large funnel AA gallery (added 1936). Note Lexington & Saratoga (CV-3) and other ships in the distance. Text i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
National Archives photo, # 19-N-14760, courtesy of David Buell.
BB-41 Mississippi 593k Exhibition model of the Mississippi (BB-41) simulating vessel afloat, by photo section of the Bureau of Construcion & Repair, Navy Yard, Washington, D.C., 28 October 1935. USN photo # 19-N-15341 from National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-41 Mississippi 71k Commemorative post mark on the occasion of Mississippi's (BB-41) participation in Fleet Week at Seattle, Washington, July - August 1935. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
BB-41 Mississippi 212k Commemorative postal cover of the Mississippi (BB-41), 19 December 1936. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-41 Mississippi 232k Mississippi (BB-41) underway in a Pacific port, circa post mid 1930's. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Battleship Row1.80kVery large (1.80k.b) 1936 photo of Battleship Row, Pearl Harbor. Among the ships in the harbor are:
The two New Orleans (CA-32) class cruisers on the far left are the Minneapolis (CA-36) nearer the camera with New Orleans (CA-32) behind. Both have the curved-faced turrets, limiting them to the CA-32/34/36 group. Within that group, only New Orleans lacked the glassed-in navigation bridge (below the pilothouse), and minor superstructure variations point to the other being Minneapolis rather than Astoria (CA-34).
The battleships from left to right: Colorado (BB-45), or West Virginia (BB-48), outboard of Idaho (BB-42), Nevada (BB-36), outboard of Mississippi (BB-41), New Mexico (BB-40), outboard of Maryland (BB-46) or California (BB-44).
On the far right is the Hospital ship Relief (AH-1) with two unidentified ships ahead and to her port side.
Text courtesy of David Johnston, (USNR), Aryeh Wetherhorn (USNR) & Richard Jensen.
Photo courtesy of Edward Cwalinski, submitted by Barry Litchfield.
BB-41 Mississippi 85k Operating at sea during the later 1930s. She has three SOC aircraft on her catapults. The original photograph is dated 20 March 1951, about a dozen years after it was actually taken. Official USN photo # USNHC 97362, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.
BB-41 Mississippi 89k Undated pre war image. Jesse P. Mannix/USN photo.
BB-39 Arizona1.36kPearl Harbor, 1938: Nautilus (SS-168) with Arizona (BB-39) behind on the right and Pennsylvania (BB-38) on the left. Portland (CL-33) is behind Pennsylvania and the bow of a New Mexico class battleship is at the extreme left.Photo courtesy of Roger Reynolds.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Photo added 07/16/15.
Pearl Harbor, 1938912kPearl Harbor, 1938: Mississippi (BB-41) anchored with radio antennas in the background. Photo courtesy of Roger Reynolds.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Photo added 07/16/15.
BB-40 New Mexico 441k Mississippi (BB-41) and New Mexico (BB-40) during the Fleet Review staged outside Los Angeles Harbor. December, 1938. USNI photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi 117k Maintenance and repairs to U.S. Navy ships at Pearl Harbor were often performed in dry docks, similar to the one shown in this 1940 photo of the battleship Mississippi (BB-41) in Dry Dock 4, Puget Sound Navy Yard. Photo & text from the Ray Daves Collection courtesy of Carol Edgemon Hipperson author of Radioman: An Eyewitness Account of Pearl Harbor & World War II in the Pacific(Thomas Dunne Books/St. Martins Press, 2008).
BB-41 Mississippi 64k The Mississippi (BB-41) at the time of her rebuild at Puget Sound Naval Yard, Washington, 8 March 1940. Photo # 434-40, courtesy of Seattle NARA RG-181, submitted by Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-41 Mississippi 99k Starboard broadside view of the Mississippi (BB-41) as rebuilt.
The three New Mexico's (BB-40-42) were the last to be rebuilt. They could be distinguished by their searchlight platforms. The Mississippi and Idaho (BB-42) had theirs far above their controls, with long struts, but the New Mexico (BB-40) had her control cabins directly under the lights.
Quite unlike their predecessors, they had tower masts supporting Mark-28 5-inch directors, the first to combine range finder and calculator into a single unit. The small cylinders were mark 31 directors, with an armored range finder at the forward end of the bridge structure. Below it, were secondary battery controls and battle lookout stations (note the eye slits), with the navigating bridge below that, then the chart house platform, the radio direction-finder platform, and the conning tower platform.
Note the four 0.50-calibre machine guns visible on the latter. The radio direction finder itself was housed between the funnel and the bridge structure. The Idaho, fitted as a flagship, had a flag bridge below her navigating bridge. Her chart house was on the radio direction-finder platform.
USN photo. Partial text courtesy of U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
BB-41 Mississippi 113k Bow view of the Mississippi (BB-41) in an undated pre-WW II photo. The New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class were distinctive in their superstructure arrangement after their 1930's rebuild. Note that she still mounts a range dial, mounted above the bridge. This and those remaining on other older battleships, were removed at the beginning of WW II. National Archives photo courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-40 New Mexico & family463kProbable front and rear photos here and below showing formations of aircraft flying over U.S. Navy battleships during exercises at sea, circa late 1930's - 1940.
Pictured here is a New Mexico (BB-40 /42) class battleship in the van with other battleships of the Pacific Fleet and a carrier air group, led by the Air Group Commander in a Curtiss SBC Helldiver.
The aircraft following are:
A torpedo squadron of eighteen Douglas TBD-1s;
A bombing squadron of eighteen Northrop BT-1s;
A scouting squadron eighteen Curtiss SBCs;
A fighting squadron of eighteen Grumman F2F-1s or F3F-3s from either the Yorktown (CV-5) or F3F-2s from the Enterprise (CV-6), plus possibly nine additional aircraft.
The Yorktown and Enterprise were the only two carriers whose bombing squadrons were equipped with the Northrop BT-1.
The text for the photo reads:
"The Navy uses enormous amounts of rubber. At least seventy-five tons of rubber, enough to makes 17,000 tires, are used in the construction of each of these battleships. Tons more are needed for the naval planes that are making history over the world. Medical and communication requirements--and countless other needs of the Navy--are met."
The lead BB looks like Mississippi (BB-41) followed by Maryland (BB-46) (rangefinder on Turret II). My first impression of the Tennessee class (BB-43 /44) is the Tennessee (BB-43), but that is not a certain ID from this photo alone. Fourth is the Oklahoma (BB-37) (no birdbath). Aside from the DD now in the lead, I see nothing in the head-on shot aerial that positively differs from the ID's of the first 4 BB's in the first photo. Of course, in the aft aerial shot, BB #5 is the California (BB-44), ID'd by the enlarged flag bridge, lending support to BB #3 in the first photo being Tennessee. Everything I see supports these three photos all being part of the same operation with at least the first 5 BB's remaining in the same order.
Photograph # LC-USE64 - DC-000944 & partial text courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Battleship i.d. & text courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Aircraft i.d. & text & timeline courtesy of Alan Moore via the following sources: Airplane i.d.: Yorktown Class Carriers (Warship Pictorial No. 9) by Steve Wiper, Tucson, AZ: Classic Warships Publishing, 2000. & That Gallant Ship: U.S.S. Yorktown (CV-5) by Robert Cressman, Missoula, MT: Pictorial Histories Pub Co, 1985. Timeline from Battleship Arizona: An Illustrated History by Paul Stillwell, Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1991.
BB-40 New Mexico & family1.62kProbable front and rear photos here and above showing formations of aircraft flying over U.S. Navy battleships during exercises at sea, circa late 1930's - 1940.
In both photos, one of the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) is leading the BB column while the remaining battleships have dual masthead fire control structures.
The air group formation in the two photos appears to be similar. The composition of 18 TBDs, 18 BT-1s, 18 SBCs, and 27 fighters is easier to distinguish in the front/surface view. I'm assuming, based on total aircraft count alone, that the formation in the rear/aerial view is the same. (The perspective makes it difficult to sort the monoplanes and biplanes into their respective types.) The only difference is that in the front/surface view the formation is lead by a Curtiss SBC Helldiver (likely the Air Group Commander) but in the rear/aerial view that lead Helldiver is not present. I suppose it's possible that the photographer was in that Helldiver's rear seat. What stands out for me is the presence of nine extra fighters beyond the normal squadron composition of 18, as seen in the other three squadrons in this formation.
Photo i.d courtesy of Chuck Haberlein, Richard Jensen, Aryeh Wetherhorn, & Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Battleship i.d. & text courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Aircraft i.d. & text courtesy of Alan Moore.
US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, photo No. 2008.104.001.234.
BB-39 Arizona1.31kBetween 9 & 13 September 1940 the Arizona (BB-39) was under way with other ships of the US Fleet for simulated fleet engagement. She is pictured here in company with other ships of the Pacific Fleet taken during Fleet Ops. and at least one carrier air group.Scanned from: "The Fleet Today" by Kendall Banning. Funk & Wagnalls Company, N.Y. and London, 1942. Submitted by Pieter Bakels.
Text & photo i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore via Battleship Arizona: An Illustrated History by Paul Stillwell, Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1991.
BB-41 Mississippi 508k Drydock No.4 PSNY: View looking North showing the Mississippi (BB-41) on 22 October 1940 in Dry Dock No. 4. The Mississippi is the first ship to be docked in the newly completed facility. Source: National Archives; Puget Sound Navy Yard, Photo No. 1831-40 via Mike Green.
BB-41 Mississippi 2.57k Xmas aboard the Mississippi (BB-41), 1940. Courtesy of Jack Treutle.
BB-41 Mississippi 224k A George Winstead photo of the Mississippi (BB-41) after she returned to Norfolk VA., 16 June 1941, she prepared for patrol service in the North Atlantic. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-41 Mississippi 236k A George Winstead photo of the Mississippi (BB-41) after she returned to Norfolk VA., possibly on Navy Day. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-41 Mississippi 902k Mississippi (BB-41) steaming through heavy weather in the North Atlantic, September 1941. From the Collection of Rear Admiral Ret. Jack Bowling, submitted by his grandson, Breck Perkins.
BB-41 Mississippi 91k Mississippi (BB-41) painted "North Atlantic Gray" at anchor at Iceland in October 1941. USN photo.
BB-41 Mississippi 462k Starboard quarter view of the Mississippi (BB-41) anchored at Hvalfjord, Iceland in October, 1941. Source: Imperial War Museum Admiralty Official Collection, Photo No.© IWM(A 5954) via Mike Green.
BB-41 Mississippi 350k Mississippi (BB-41) anchored at Hvalfjord, Iceland in mid-November, 1941. Source: Imperial War Museum Admiralty Official Collection, Photo No.© IWM(A 6601) via Mike Green.
BB-41 Mississippi 478k Port quarter view of the Mississippi (BB-41) anchored at Hvalfjord, Iceland in mid-November, 1941. Source: Imperial War Museum Admiralty Official Collection, Photo No.© IWM(A 6392) via Mike Green.
BB-41 Mississippi 498k Starboard quarter view of the Mississippi (BB-41) anchored at Hvalfjord, Iceland in November, 1941. Source: Imperial War Museum Admiralty Official Collection, by Parnall, C.H. (Lt), Photo No.© IWM(A 6391) via Mike Green.
WW II
BB-40 New Mexico 368k The New Mexico (BB-40) at Norfolk, 31 December 1941. She is equipped with the then "state of the art" quadruple 1.1"/75 machine guns [later replaced by the Bofors 40mm gun(s)]. She has also just been fitted with 20mm Oerkilons, but still was equipped with 0.5 caliber machine guns which the 20mm ultimately replaced. The camouflaged ship alongside the near side of the next pier is George F. Elliott (AP-13). Note: number "40" painted atop New Mexico's second 14"/50 triple gun turret; Mark 33 and other gun directors atop her superstructure; FC radar antenna on one of the directors and SC radar antenna mounted at the top of her mainmast.
New Mexico is in the process of being painted up in splotches. This picture is just one of an extensive close-up series showing all three New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class battleships being repainted at the same time. The sun is very low, coming strong off the port bow. This is causing the angled surfaces on the bridge (and all other shapes in the same plane ) to appear to be "washed out" of color.
Note the sailors on top of turret #1 (left side of photo, extreme bottom). They are applying 5-H. Earlier they had spilled some on the roof, leaving a circle from the paint can. Mississippi (BB-41) in the background is still in Measure 1. Close-ups show her caulk marked to be painted in splotches of S.B. (5-S) and O.G. (5-0) only. Idaho (BB-42) (not shown), New Mexico and the vessel behind her all carried standard three color splotch patterns of 5-S, 5-0 and 5-H."
Partial text courtesy of USNHC photo # 19-N-27362.
Camouflage text courtesy of "United States Navy CAMOUFLAGE of the WW2 ERA" by Larry Sowinsky, the "Floating Drydock", Phil.PA.,1976.) & submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi484k Overhead Port Side view of the Mississippi (BB-41) looking aft at Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, VA. 3 January 1942. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi315k Port bow, close-up. Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, VA. 3 January 1942. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi372k Port Quarter, close-up of the Mississippi (BB-41) at Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, VA. 3 January 1942. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi264k Looking aft from bow of the Mississippi (BB-41) at Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, VA. 3 January 1942. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi481k Overhead port,looking fwd. on the Mississippi (BB-41) at Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, VA. 3 January 1942. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi290k Looking fwd. from stern at the Mississippi (BB-41) at Norfolk Navy Yard, Portsmouth, VA. 3 January 1942. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi 135k June, 1942 photo of the ship at San Pedro before many modifications were done. Elaborate searchlight controls have been eliminated and 20mm guns supplement her four quadruple 1.1/75 caliber A.A. mounts. USN photo.
BB-41 Mississippi 83k June, 1942 photo of the ship at San Pedro before many modifications were done. Elaborate searchlight controls have been eliminated and 20mm guns supplement her four quadruple 1.1/75 caliber A.A. mounts. USN photo.
SS 158 62k The S-47 (SS-158) off San Francisco, CA., 7 September 1943, following overall. A platform has been added to her conning tower for a single 20-millimeter antiaircraft gun; her gun deck gun is a manually-operated dual-purpose 3-inch 50-caliber. Mounted just ahead of her periscopes is an SJ surface-search and torpedo-control radar. The small tripod forward of the deck gun supports an early type of underwater listening equipment. S-47 displays no identification except her national ensign, and wears dull black wartime submarine finish.
In the left background is the characteristic silhouette of a New Mexico class (BB-40 / 42) battleship. Both the Mississippi (BB-41) & Idaho (BB-42) were there at the time, with the Idaho arriving that day.
USN photo # NH 42192, from the collections of the US Naval Historical Center.
BB-41 Mississippi 136k Stern view of the Mississippi (BB-41) off San Francisco on 8 October 1943. USN photo # 7006-43, courtesy of Darryl L. Baker.
BB-41 Mississippi 521k Starboard broadside view of the Mississippi (BB-41) off San Francisco on 8 October 1943. USN photo # 7007-43, courtesy of David Buell.
BB-41 Mississippi196k Mississippi (BB-41) Plan view aft. San Francisco, Ca. 8 October 1943. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi289k Mississippi (BB-41) at San Francisco, CA. October 1943. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi522k Lots of action going on as sailors go through their work details aboard the Mississippi (BB-41) at San Francisco, CA. October 1943. Checking rations on the life rafts, hanging laundry, working on the funnel, etc.
Note the new 20mm gallery P/S of the stack, on the mainmast radar platform an "SK" air search antenna. Note the Mk.3 main battery fire control radar atop her aft director and the Mk.51 director directly below for the twin and a quad. 40mm's that have been installed.
USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi521k Photo taken a little bit more to starboard of the above photo.
Note the new 20mm gallery P/S of the stack, on the mainmast radar platform an "SK" air search antenna. Note the Mk.3 main battery fire control radar atop her aft director and the Mk.51 director directly below for the twin and a quad. 40mm's that have been installed.
USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi489kMississippi (BB-41) in the still full dry dock at Hunters Point, San Francisco, CA., October 1943.
Note the 45-Inch perforated parabolic Mk.18 antenna coupled in level and cross-level to the optical rangefinder of the 5-Inch GFCS. Mk.28, just installed.
Note the circled Mk.3 main battery fire control antenna and the RDF loop in front of her stack. Atop her foremast "SG", a 10-cm surface search radar.
USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi408kMississippi (BB-41) 40MM. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-42 Idaho98kPhotographed from Natoma Bay (CVE-62), shortly after the conclusion of the Gilberts Campaign, September - December 1943. The three battleships, in an anchorage protected by anti-torpedo nets, are (from left to right): Idaho (BB-42), New Mexico (BB-40), and Mississippi (BB-41). USNHC # 80-G-275940 from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.
BB-42 Idaho106kThe Idaho (BB-42), New Mexico (BB-40) & Mississippi (BB-41) at Pearl Harbor sometime after 5 December 1943. All three battleships then proceeded with the Marshall Islands assault force 12 January 1944. Photo courtesy of Joseph MacDonald. Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-41 Mississippi 70k Mississippi (BB-41) inboard profile, 1944, largely unchanged since her reconstruction in the 1930's. Photo and text courtesy of U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
BB-40 New Mexico 117k Drawing prepared by the Bureau of Ships for Camouflage Measure 32, Design 6D intended for battleships of the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class. This plan, approved by Captain Logan McKee, USN, is dated 16 February 1944. It shows the ship's starboard side, superstructure ends and exposed decks. Ships known or reported to have worn this camouflage design include New Mexico (BB-40) and Mississippi (BB-41). Official USN photo # 80-G-166247, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico 100k Drawing prepared by the Bureau of Ships for Camouflage Measure 32, Design 6D intended for battleships of the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class. This plan, approved by Captain Logan McKee, USN, is dated 16 February 1944. It shows the ship's port side, superstructure ends and exposed decks. Ships known or reported to have worn this camouflage design include New Mexico (BB-40) and Mississippi (BB-41). Official USN photo # 80-G-166246, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-41 Mississippi118k Puget Sound Navy Yard, (Photo taken by Ship, 2 May 1944) Gun lifted clear of trunnions and returned to level position to level position for un-sleving device. Seattle NARA photo # 1817-44. Record Group 181, 13th Naval District, Records of the Naval District & Shore Establishments, Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-41 Mississippi68k Puget Sound Navy Yard, (Photo taken by Ship, 2 May 1944) Right gun pit ready to receive new gun. Cap square shifted over. Upper portion of flameproof seals installed on inboard deck lugs. Seattle NARA photo # 1818-44. Record Group 181, 13th Naval District, Records of the Naval District & Shore Establishments, Photo courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-48 West Virginia227k West Virginia (BB-48) at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard finishing overhaul on 28 June 1944. Note workers painting 5-O Ocean Gray for her Measure 32 / 7D camouflage on forward deck and chains for paravanes rigged. Mississippi (BB-41) is in background across the pier. USN photo # 2536-44 from NARA San Francisco, Pearl Harbor Navy Yard General Correspondence Files, courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-41 Mississippi 2.47k Either the New Mexico (BB-40) or Mississippi (BB-41) transfers wounded from a destroyer (probably Braine (DD-630) off Saipan, just out of range of shore batteries. Released 6 July 1944. USN photos # 253539 & # 253544, courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi 79k 13 July 1944, showing her starboard side wavy pattern measure 32/6D camouflage. Compare the radical difference in the camouflage patterns between starboard and port. USN photo.
BB-41 Mississippi 342k Broadside view, starboard side of the Mississippi (BB-41), taken in overcast weather at Puget Sound, 16 July 1944. BuShips photo # 69064, courtesy of David Buell.
BB-41 Mississippi 340k Stern view, port side of the Mississippi (BB-41), taken in overcast weather at Puget Sound, 16 July 1944. BuShips photo # 69069, courtesy of David Buell.
BB-40 New Mexico 111k Drawing prepared by the Bureau of Ships for Camouflage Measure 32, Design 3D intended for battleships of the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class. This plan, approved by Captain Torvald A. Solberg, USN, is dated 18 August 1944. It shows the ship's starboard side, horizontal surfaces and superstructure ends. Official USN photo # 19-N-104916, from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives
BB-40 New Mexico 113kDrawing prepared by the Bureau of Ships for a camouflage scheme intended for battleships of the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) class. This plan, approved by Captain Torvald A. Solberg, USN, is dated 19 August 1944. It shows the ship's port side. Official USN photo # 19-N-104915, from the Bureau of Ships Collection in the U.S. National Archives
BB-41 Mississippi 92k Casemate gun crew loading their 5"/51 guns during the bombardment of Peleliu, circa mid-September 1944. Note line of shell passers in the background, and the gun's breech in the lower right foreground. Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-48380, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-41 Mississippi 114k After a week of continuous operations, Mississippi (BB-41) then steamed to Manus, where she remained until 12 October 1944.
She appears here at the floating dry-dock ABSD-2 at Manus.
The dry-dock was used for forward repair of non seriously damaged ships in the final Pacific War push. As the dry-docks were displacement limited, as to their capacity, fuel and sometimes ammunition had to be offloaded to "lighten ship". In this instance, 700,000 gallons of fuel had to be offloaded in order to meet the lifting capacity of the dry-dock.
USN photo. Partial text courtesy of DANFS. Photo i.d. courtesy of Chuck Haberlein.
BB-41 Mississippi 268k A painting by the artist Wayne Scarpaci entitled "South Pacific Advanced Base" depicting the Mississippi (BB-41) in a floating dry-dock, 1944. Next to her is the Delta (AR-9). Drawing courtesy of artbywayne.com.
BB-41 Mississippi 98k A line drawing by A.L. Raven of the Mississippi (BB-41) in November 1944. Photo and text courtesy of U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
BB-41 Mississippi 102k Lingayen Invasion, January 1945. Mississippi (BB-41) bombarding Luzon, during the Lingayen operation, 8 January 1945. She is followed by West Virginia (BB-48) and HMAS Shropshire. Photographed from New Mexico (BB-40). Mississippi is painted in camouflage Measure 32, Design 6D. Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-301229, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-41 Mississippi 48k Walke (DD-723), right center,and Mississippi (BB-41), left center cover the landings in Lingayen Gulf, Luzon, Philippine Islands, 9 January 1945. Two other destroyer types are present at each side of the photo. Walke is painted in what appears to be Camouflage Measure 31, Design 25D. Mississippi's camouflage is Measure 32, Design 6D. Official USN photo # 80-G-K-2516, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-41 Mississippi 490k Photo taken in 1944 showing the crowded condition of the extra 40mm and 20mm guns. They were added wherever deck space was available. USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi 90k Three types of armament are visible - 5in/25cal guns, 40mm Bofors, and 20mm Oerlikons.
When the ship was refitted at Pearl Harbor in the spring of 1945, her captain insisted that extra secondary and light weight A.A. weapons be added to the ship. The final remaining, casemate mounted, 5"/51s were removed and the casemates plated over. In there place eight 5"/25s were added, bringing the total guns of that type to sixteen. She now carried twelve 40mm quadruple mounts, two more than she had before the refit.
USN photo submitted by Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi 132k The 5-Inch, 25-caliber anti-aircraft gun was designed and developed by the Navy to fill the need for an A.A. gun of larger caliber with a high rate of fire, however, it could also be used for firing at surface targets.
The gun was semi-automatic and was invariably used as such when firing at aircraft targets.
The slide was a large box-shaped steel housing with a rear plate bolted on its after end.
The slide housed the breech of the gun and guided the gun during recoil and counter recoil.
The forward ends of the two recoil piston rods were secured to the forward end of the slide.
The recoil system is of the hydraulic type.
The after end of the counter-recoil plunger was secured to the after end of the slide.(rear plate) The counter-recoil system was of the hydraulic-pneumatic type.
The trunnions were on the outboard sides of the slide, and, through them, the weight of the gun and the force of recoil were delivered to the carriage.
The elevating arc was secured to the slide directly under the forward part. The breech mechanism hand-operating lever was mounted on the right side of the slide.
The power rammer was mounted on the right side of the slide and above it.
The carriage was supported on the stand by two ball bearings, an inner and an outer ball bearing.
The outer bearing took the compression, load and weight, and vertical downward trust of recoil when the gun was fired.
The inner bearing held the carriage on the stand and thus took the tension load due to the roll of the ship and to upward thrust of recoil when the gun was fired at low angles of elevation.
Training and elevating gears were standard broadside-mount types.
The stand was a low heavy steel casting having a square base.
The stand contained the lower ball race for the outer ball bearing and the upper ball race for the inner ball bearing.
The fuse setter was mounted to the left and aft of the breech of the gun on a platform which was attached to the gun carriage.
The gun could be moved rapidly in both elevation and train.
The trunnions were equipped with roller bearings which served both as main trunnion and frictionless trunnion bearings.
USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi 27k Damage from a kamikaze attack on the Mississippi (BB-41), 9 January 1945. Photo from WWII Damage Reports, courtesy of NavSea / dcfp.navy.mil.
BB-41 Mississippi 197k Bow view of the Mississippi (BB-41) on 12 April 1945. This photo is one of a series taken after she had repairs for kamikaze damage and also had her armament upgraded at Pearl Harbor. Text & USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-41 Mississippi 845k Mississippi (BB-41), top side from 500 feet, altitude off stern, 12 April 1945. BuShips photo, #81387,courtesy of David Buell.
BB-41 Mississippi 23k Damage from a kamikaze attack on the Mississippi (BB-41), 6 May 1945, off the coast of Okinawa. Photo from WWII Damage Reports, courtesy of NavSea / dcfp.navy.mil.
BB-41 Mississippi181kMississippi's (BB-41) band poses for some smiles in mid-1945. Photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-41 Mississippi150kAgainst the backdrop of the fleet in a protective anchorage, the Mississippi's (BB-41) crew rolls some 14"/50 shells down the deck in mid-1945. Photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-41 Mississippi158kTransferring supplies in mid-1945. Photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-41 Mississippi 106k Capt. Jerauld B. Wright was the commanding officer of the battleship Mississippi (BB-41) in 1945. Photo courtesy of Life Magazine VIA Bill Gonyo.
BB-41 Mississippi 2.66k Wire photo of the Mississippi (BB-41) and the light cruiser Concord (CL-8), en route for Navy Day celebrations, are towed on 8 October 1945 in the Panama Canal. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi 516k 10 October 1945: Pacific fleet steams towards Panama Canal on way home for Navy Day celebration, 27 October 1945.
Mississippi (BB-41) & Portland (CA-33) in left background.
USN photo # 80-G-701167 from National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-41 Mississippi 136k Canal operators watching Mississippi (BB-41) making passage through section of Panama Canal as most of crew stand above decks 12 October 1945. Photographer: Thomas D. Mcavoy, courtesy of life.time.com
Photo i.d. courtesy of David Buell.
BB-41 Mississippi 137k US soldier standing guard over section of Panama Canal; Mississippi (BB-41) with full crew on deck entering canal in background accompanied by a tender ship. Photographer: Thomas D. Mcavoy, courtesy of life.time.com
Photo i.d. courtesy of David Buell.
BB-41 Mississippi 78kMississippi (BB-41) in the Mississippi River, en route to take part in Navy Day celebrations at New Orleans, Louisiana, 16 October 1945. Note her anchors suspended below their normal stowed position at the bow. Photograph # SC 215864, from the Army Signal Corps Collection in the U.S. National Archives.
BB-41 Mississippi 1.98k The Mississippi (BB-41) on 27 October 1945, moored for Navy Day celebrations with the paddlesteamer President. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-41 Mississippi 17.5k Mississippi (BB-41) WW II cruise book PDF with over 120 photos. Courtesy of Robert Hall.
Gunnery Training Ship (AG-128) / Scrapping
BB-41 Mississippi 84k Mississippi (AG-128) photographed in 1947-48. She retains only her after 14" gun turret, but carries numerous smaller weapons and a special radar suite.U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 86646, from the collection of Rear Admiral Frederic S. Withington, 1975.
BB-41 Mississippi 77k Mississippi (AG-128) as seen in 1948 shortly after the conversion was completed. She still retains #4 14" turret and her quarterdeck catapult. As in the other picture, the various caliber twin 5" turrets are clearly seen along the superstructure. USN photo.
BB-41 Mississippi 473k Mississippi (AG-128) arrives in NYC, 28 October 1949. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-41 Mississippi 99k Photo of the Mississippi (AG-128) taken 1 February 1950 from the bridge of the Missouri (BB-63) as the Missouri was being towed to dry-dock at Norfolk Navy Yard, after grounding in Chesapeake Bay. USN photo.
BB-41 Mississippi 473k Commemorative postal cover of the Mississippi (AG-128) with a photo inset prior to her re-conversion, 9, November 1953. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-41 Mississippi 545k Happy 37th birthday Mississippi (AG-128)!
Wire photo dated 12-21-53 at Bremerton Wa.
Photograph courtesy of Ron Reeves.
BB-62 New Jersey63k Photo taken from the radar platform on the foremast of Chewaucan (AOG-50), very early on a Sunday morning. New Jersey (BB-62) and Missouri BB-63, sitting side by side in reserve at Norfolk, Va, summer of 1954. The New Jersey, is tied to pier 7 and the Chewaucan was tied up to pier 5. (There was no pier 6). You can see how small we were when you check the height of the horizon behind the New Jersey's mast. The ship on the horizon above the New Jersey is the Mississippi (AG-128) (ex-BB-41). Photo. i.d. courtesy of Dan DeCosta.
Photo and text courtesy of Larry Bohn.
BB-41 Mississippi 108k February 1955 photo showing the Mississippi (AG-128) carrying the Terrier missile battery. A twin 6"/47 turret is installed at the #1 14" turret location and the various caliber 5" turrets are visible along the superstructure. USN photo.
BB-41 Mississippi 588k Terrier guided missile being launched from the stern of the Mississippi (AG-128). Note the destroyer Richard E. Krause (DD-849) in the background. USN official photo courtesy of Robert Hurst.
BB-41 Mississippi268k Black & white copy of evaluation of Terrier guided missiles by Mississippi (AG-128) at sea on 28 March 1955. Color version here. Official USN photo # USN 659366, courtesy of David Buell.
BB-41 Mississippi316k Mississippi (AG-128) firing Terriers, dated "Received 28 March 1955". Date of event not stated. Good detail on the launchers and decks.USN photo # 659358 courtesy of David Buell.
BB-41 Mississippi 376k Oh say can you see the rockets red glare by the Mississippi's (AG-128) flag as it takes off in the mid 50's. USN photograph # USN-668739 courtesy of Ryan Crierie & flickr.com via Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-41 Mississippi 76k May 1955 photo showing the Mississippi (AG-128) underway in New York harbor. Photographed & contributed by Bill Fuzak.
BB-41 Mississippi 376k Wire photo dated 1 August 1956 shows her stern stingers. Mississippi (AG-128) would be decommissioned next month. Photograph courtesy of Tommy Trampp.
BB-66 Kentucky 196k Kentucky (BB-66) moored to the pier at the Norfolk Navy Yard, Virginia, 24 October 1956 with YO-145 & Crownblock (YO-48) alongside on the right. The Mississippi (AG-128) is moored to the other side of the pier. Official USN photo # DSR-10187, courtesy of David Buell.
BB-41 Mississippi 582k Mississippi (AG-128) passes under the Bay Bridge on trip to Baltimore to be scrapped. Photograph courtesy of Baltimore Sun via Joe MacDonald.
BB-41 Mississippi 829k Mississippi (AG-128) being scrapped in Baltimore, 1957. Photograph courtesy of Baltimore Sun via Joe MacDonald.
(NISMF)376kA guest studies a painting depicting the history of battleships. The artwork was painted by George Skybeck and presented to the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association during their annual banquet at Honolulu, Hawaii, on 8 December 1991. USN photo # DN-SC-92-05391, by PHC Carolyn Harris, from the Department of Defense Still Media Collection, courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil.
World War II Memorial371k A quote made by Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz is inscribed on a granite wall at the National World War II Memorial located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Fleet Adm. Nimitz was the United States signatory to the surrender terms aboard the battleship Missouri (BB-63) in Tokyo Bay, Japan on 2 September 1945, thus ending World War II. Established by the American Battle Monuments Commission, the memorial honors all military veterans of World War II, the citizens on the home front, the nation at large, and the high moral purpose and idealism that motivated the nationís call to arms. On 29 May 2004, the memorial was formally dedicated with an estimated 200,000 people expected to attend, and includes 100,000 visiting veterans of all wars. USN photo # N-0295M-011 by Photographerís Mate 2nd Class Daniel J. McLain, courtesy of news.navy.mil.
BB-41 Mississippi 123k Mississippi's (BB-41) bell still rings! It is located within the garden of the Rosalie Mansion and Museum in Natchez, Ms. The marker on the right side states "In honor of Mississippi men who served in the Mississippi," and gives a list of some 79 personnel who served on board the ship between 1917 til 1956. The rope is provided so you can sound the bell. It was 12 noon so I sounded 8 bells in accordance with Naval tradition Courtesy of Larry Lee.

USS MISSISSIPPI BB-41 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry
(Located On The Hazegray & Underway Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)

Crew Contact And Reunion Information
USS Mississippi ARG-128

Contact Name: Mr. Jack Hefferman
Address: 163 Shawn's Hideaway, Millsboro, DE, 19966
Phone: 302-947-1896
E-mail: None


Note About Contacts.

The contact listed, Was the contact at the time for this ship when located. If another person now is the contact, E-mail me and I will update this entry. These contacts are compiled from various sources over a long period of time and may or may not be correct. Every effort has been made to list the newest contact if more than one contact was found.


Additional Resources
Hazegray & Underway Battleship Pages By Andrew Toppan.

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