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NavSource Online: Battleship Photo Archive

BB-43 USS TENNESSEE

Radio Call Sign: November - India - Delta - November


Tennessee Class Battleship: Displacement 32,300 Tons, Dimensions, 624' (oa) x 97' 4" x 31' (Max). Armament 12 x 14"/50 14 x 5"/51, 4 x 3"/50AA 2 x 21" tt. Armor, 13 1/2" Belt, 18" Turrets, 3 1/2" +1 1/2" Decks, 16" Conning Tower. Machinery, 26,800 SHP; Turbines with electric drive, 4 screws. Speed, 21 Knots, Crew 1083.

Operational and Building Data: Laid down by New York Naval Ship Yard, May 14, 1917. Launched April 30, 1919. Commissioned June 3, 1920. Decommissioned February 14, 1947. Stricken March 1, 1959.
Fate: Sold July 16, 1959 and broken up for scrap.
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Bids950kNavy Yards Bid For U.S. Dreadnoughts.Image and text provided by University of North Texas; Denton, TX.
Photo from El Paso Herald.(El Paso, Tex.) 1901-1931, 17 November 1915, HOME EDITION, Image 1, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-43 Tennessee 1.70k Tennessee (BB-43) view from bow looking stern-ward, 6 October 1917. Photo No. 3444, Brooklyn Navy Yard Archive - courtesy National Archive and Records Administration, Northeast Region - NYC, Record Group 181 via flickr.com.
BB-43 Tennessee 118k Tennessee (BB-43) under construction at New York Naval Shipyard, Brooklyn N.Y., 1 October 1918. In this view looking forward, the small plating can be seen rising in the stern area, the cylinders are the armored barbettes of the main battery; and forward of the second barbette, the slanting, side structures are the armored stack uptakes. USN photo and text courtesy of Warships in Profile, Volume 2, by John Wingate, Profile Publications LTD, Windsor, Berkshire, U.K.
BB-43 Tennessee815kThe Tennessee (BB-43), a Naval Marvel, Ready to Join Our Sea Forces
Superdreadnought, Scheduled to Take the Water This Week, Largest and Latest of Floating Fortresses - The Sixth Ship of Her Name, She Will Be the Queen of the Fleet
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Sun. (New York, [N.Y.]) 1916-1920, 27 April 1919, Section 7 Magazine Section, Image 75, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-43 Tennessee 3.55k Text accompanying photo reads: "Miss Helen Roberts, sponsor for the Tennessee (BB-43), and daughter of Governor A. H., Roberts of Tennessee, her maids of honor & guests at the Tennessee's launching.
Miss Roberts is Standing Between Assistant Secretary of the Navy Franklin D. Roosevelt and Her Father."

"The U.S. super-dreadnought Tennessee (BB-43), MOST POWERFUL NAVAL BATTLE UNIT BUILT IN THE HISTORY OF THE WORLD. Gliding Down the Ways of the Brooklyn Navy Yard Into the East River at the First Public Launching at This Navy Yard Since Early in 1917, More Than 25,000 People Attending.
The Tennessee,Will Displace 32, 600 Tons. It Is 624 Feet in Length, 97 Feet in Breadth, with a Mean Draft of 30 Feet 6 Inches. It Will Have an Indicated Horsepower of 28,000 and a Speed of Twenty-one Knots an Hour. Its Crew Will Consist of Fifty-eight Officers, 1,024 Men. It Will Be Exclusively Oil Burning and Electrically Driven, with an Armament of Twelve 14-Inch Guns and Fourteen 6- Inch Guns. The Tennessee, Though Named for a Bone-Dry State, Was Christened with Champagne, Over the Protest of Governor A. H., Roberts of Tennessee, Elected on a Prohibition Ticket."
Photo by Times Wide World Photo, & text courtesy of N.Y. Times,, 4 May 1919, Page 2, courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
BB-43 Tennessee 124k 30 April 1919, Miss Helen Lenore Roberts, daughter of the governor of Tennessee christens the battleship Tennessee (BB-43). USN photo courtesy of Myron J. Smith Jr, from his book "Volunteer State Battlewagon", from Pictorial Histories Publishing, Missoula, Montana.
BB-43 Tennessee 155k The champagne flies against the side of the Tennessee (BB-43) as Miss Helen Lenore Roberts christens the battleship.Digital ID # ggbain 28726v, LC-B2-4903-14. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection.
BB-43 Tennessee607kWorld's Greatest Battleship Is Launched In Navy Yard Here as 100,000 Persons Cheer
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Evening World. (New York, N.Y.) 1887-1931, 30 April 1919, Final Edition - Extra, Image 3, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-43 Tennessee405kThe launching of the Tennessee (BB-43) at the New York Navy Yard on April 30. Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation
Photo by The Sun. (New York [N.Y.]) 1916-1920, 11 May 1919, Section 5 Pictorial Section, Image 50, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-43 Tennessee 122k Text accompanying photo reads: "The U.S. super-dreadnought Tennessee (BB-43), largest battle unit of the sea so far designed for any navy in the world now approaching completion in the Brooklyn Navy Yard." Photo by Underwood & Underwood, courtesy of memory.loc.gov. Text courtesy of N.Y. Times 7 December 1919, Page 7.
BB-43 Tennessee 672k PRIZE U.S. SUPERDREADNOUGHT NEARS COMPLETION Image and text provided by University of Utah, Marriott Library.
Photo from The Ogden Standard. (Ogden City, Utah) 1913-1920, 03 January 1920, LAST EDITION - 4 P.M., Image 4, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-43 Tennessee21kThe fighting top with which the new Tennessee (BB-43) is equipped. Uncle Sam's new super-dreadnought, one of the largest and most powerful afloat, is soon to be placed in commission at the Brooklyn navy yard.Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
Photo by New-York Tribune.(New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 11 April 1920, Image 53 courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-43 Tennessee 646k Volunteer State Lives Up to Name in Manning Tennessee (BB-43)
Newest Superdreadnought Gets Native Born Crew in Most Remarkable Recruiting Campaign in Naval History.
Image and text provided by The New York Public Library, Astor, Lenox and Tilden Foundation.
Photo from The Sun and the New York Herald. (New York [N.Y.]) 1920-1920, 11 April 1920, Section 7 Magazine Section, Image 75, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
Richard Henry Leigh 141k Admiral Richard Henry Leigh, then a Captain, was the Commanding Officer for the battleship Tennessee (BB-43) when she was commissioned on 3 June 1920 and continued as her commander until 1921. Photo courtesy of the Library of Congress via Bill Gonyo.
BB-43 Tennessee 743k The Battleship Tennessee (BB-43) with secondary armament.Image and text provided by Penn State University Libraries; University Park, PA.
Photo from Evening Public Ledger. (Philadelphia [Pa.]) 1914-1942, 3 June 1920, NIGHT EXTRA FINANCIAL, Image 10, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-43 Tennessee 80k Recruiting poster for the Tennessee (BB-43). USN photo courtesy of Myron J. Smith Jr, from his book "Volunteer State Battlewagon", from Pictorial Histories Publishing, Missoula, Montana.
BB-43 Tennessee 22.57k Tennessee (BB-43) dockside sometime shortly after her commissioning. Digital ID # ggbain 30527v, LC-B2-5198-13. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection.
BB-43 Tennessee 93k Men and women gather on the deck of the Tennessee (BB-43) sometime shortly after her commissioning. Digital ID # ggbain 30524v, LC-B2-5198-13. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Division, from the George Grantham Bain Collection.
BB-43 Tennessee 103k Tennessee (BB-43) completing after launching at Brooklyn. Outline of armor belt can be seen below the lower line of ports. The Battleship in the background is probably the Nevada (BB-36). USN photo and text courtesy of Warships in Profile, Volume 2, by John Wingate, Profile Publications LTD, Windsor, Berkshire, U.K.
BB-43 Tennessee 791k A cloud of smoke trails behind the Tennessee (BB-43) while at full power, 21.9 knots as she heads for N.Y. after conducting trials in Long Island Sound from 15 to 23 October 1920. Photo from the James R. Nehez, Sr. collection, courtesy of James R. Nehez, III. Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-43 Tennessee 38k Tennessee (BB-43) forward main battery, 14in/50 guns, during construction 30 August 1920. USN photo and text courtesy of Warships in Profile, Volume 2, by John Wingate, Profile Publications LTD, Windsor, Berkshire, U.K.
BB-43 Tennessee 41k One of Tennessee's (BB-43) 5in/51 guns in its case-mate 30 August 1920, starboard side looking aft. Shutters for the gun are secured to the bulkhead just forward of the gun. USN photo and text courtesy of Warships in Profile, Volume 2, by John Wingate, Profile Publications LTD, Windsor, Berkshire, U.K.
BB-43 Tennessee 33k Tennessee's (BB-43) flag locker aft, 12 October 1920. There was storage furnished for 150 signal flags. The canvas covered objects around the mainmast are searchlights. USN photo and text courtesy of Warships in Profile, Volume 2, by John Wingate, Profile Publications LTD, Windsor, Berkshire, U.K.
BB-43 Tennessee 26k Control tower, bridge, forward main battery director and foremast on Tennessee (BB-43), 12 October 1920. The three level observation and fire control tops on the foremast were first used by the USN on Tennessee. USN photo and text courtesy of Warships in Profile, Volume 2, by John Wingate, Profile Publications LTD, Windsor, Berkshire, U.K.
BB-43 Tennessee 365k THE WORLD'S BIGGEST BATTLESHIP, your Uncle Sam's super-dreadnought Tennessee (BB-43), as seen from the Brooklyn Bridge a week ago Friday as she put out to sea on her trial trip. She is 630 feet long, of 32,500 tons, .53,000 horsepower, burns oil, of which she can carry 1,900 tons, cost over $22,000,000, and is the first ship to recruit her personnel in the state after which she is named. Image and text provided by Library of Congress, Washington, DC. & censored by Tom Kermen.
Photo from New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 24 October 1920, Image 54 & 55, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-43 Tennessee 237k Foreground is definitely Tennessee (BB-43). In the middle is Idaho (BB-42) (darker camouflage note also the fantail catapult) and upper right is Arizona (BB-39), less certain but based on main mast platforms verses the New Mexico (BB-40). Middle background is New York (BB-34) (navigation bridge not over hanging conning tower). The far left background is the Texas (BB-35) (blunt bow, 2 funnels).
The aircraft is a Naval Aircraft Factory / Curtiss / Canadian Aeroplane Ltd F-5L.
The date of Mr. Kreisman's photo has to be 1920-1921. By 1922 all 14' and 16" gunned BB's (except New York and Texas as the 5th turret did not leave enough deck space) had been fitted with a compressed air catapult on the stern. The presence of a stern A/C catapult on only one of the three 1916 program BB's suggest this early in the introduction of this equipment but late enough for the turret top fly-off platforms to have been removed from all ships present. In 1919 the Battle Fleet shifted its base to San Pedro in California where it remained based until shifted to Pearl Harbor. The Texas and New York were assigned to that fleet until they returned east for modernization in 1925. This would suggest that the photo was taken some where in the Pacific. The rich flora onshore suggest a tropical climate and the enclosed by would lead me to guess Panama or Gitmo. If the 1920 or 1921 Fleet problem was conducted in Atlantic waters could explain an Atlantic based aircraft with a Pacific based Fleet.
Photo courtesy of Lance Kreisman via Fabio Pen~a.
Photo & text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn, Alan Moore & Richard Jensen.
Aircraft i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore via Larkins, William T. US Navy Aircraft 1921-1941/US Marine Corps Aircraft 1914-1959. [The image came from the USMC aircraft section, pg(9).] Atglen, PA: Schiffer Publishing, 1995. (originally published as US Marine Corps Aircraft 1914-1959, copyright 1959, and US Navy Aircraft 1921-1941, copyright 1961).
BB-43 Tennessee 915k After fitting out, Tennessee (BB-43) conducted trials in Long Island Sound from 15 to 23 October 1920. While Tennessee was at New York, one of her 300-kilowatt ship's-service generators blew up on 30 October "completely destroying the turbine end of the machine" and injuring two men. Undaunted, the ship's force, navy yard craftsmen, and manufacturers' representatives labored to eliminate the "teething troubles" in Tennessee's engineering system and enabled the battleship to depart New York on 26 February 1921 for standardization trials at Guantanamo. She next steamed north for the Virginia Capes and arrived at Hampton Roads on 19 March. Tennessee carried out gunnery calibration firing at Dahlgren, Va., and was drydocked at Boston before full-power trials off Rockland, Maine. After touching at New York, she steamed south; transited the Panama Canal; and, on 17 June, arrived at San Pedro, Calif., her home port for the next 19 years.
A tug boat taking a target barge out for the Tennessee (pictured behind the barge) while conducting gunnery calibration firing at Dahlgren, Va.
Photo from the James R. Nehez, Sr. collection, courtesy of James R. Nehez, III. Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
BB-43 Tennessee 869k Tennessee (BB-43) is pictured in Boston Dry Dock, March, 1921. Photo from the James R. Nehez, Sr. collection, courtesy of James R. Nehez, III.
BB-43 Tennessee 673k Port side view at dock, probably in Boston, Mass., 1921. Photo from the James R. Nehez, Sr. collection, courtesy of James R. Nehez, III.
BB-43 Tennessee 581k FULL SPEED AHEAD
First trial trip of the U.S. Battleship Tennessee (BB-43) off the coast of Maine. This is Uncle Sam's largest and latest pet.
Image and text provided by Oklahoma Historical Society.
Photo & text by The Daily Ardmoreite.(Ardmore, Okla.) 1893-current, 12 June 1921, HOME EDITION, Image 11, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-43 Tennessee 738k Chugging along at full power, 21.9 knots during trials. Photo from the James R. Nehez, Sr. collection, courtesy of James R. Nehez, III.
BB-43 Tennessee 744k Full Power Trials at Rockland, ME., circa May 1921. Photo from the James R. Nehez, Sr. collection, courtesy of James R. Nehez, III.
BB-43 Tennessee 329k A Tennessee (BB-43) class battleship firing a broadside. Photo courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via flickr.com.
(BB-43/44) 1.20k Black & white in color photo of Tennessee (BB-43) underway at high speed with its background possibly enshrouded from her fumes from her aft main battery during target practice; her main forward battery is trained out to starboard, taken during her full power trials. USNI Photo Navy Recruiting Bureau, N.Y. Photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels & Tim Muir.
BB-43 Tennessee 552k Swabbies swabbing. Photo from the James R. Nehez, Sr. collection, courtesy of James R. Nehez, III.
BB-43 Tennessee 729k Work detail preparing for drydocking. Photo from the James R. Nehez, Sr. collection, courtesy of James R. Nehez, III.
BB-43 Tennessee 589k In the Panama Canal, June 1921. Photo from the James R. Nehez, Sr. collection, courtesy of James R. Nehez, III.
BB-43 Tennessee 858k In the Gatun Lock of the Panama Canal, June 1921. Photo from the James R. Nehez, Sr. collection, courtesy of James R. Nehez, III.
BB-43 Tennessee 540k Battleship Tennessee (BB-43), Giant Of Yank Navy, Drops Anchor In Harbor at San Pedro
Image and text provided by Oklahoma Historical Society.
Photo & text by The Morning Tulsa Daily World. (Tulsa, Okla.) 1919-1927, 03 July 1921, FINAL EDITION, SECTION B, Image 24, courtesy of chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
BB-41 Mississippi 230k Tennessee (BB-43) & other members of the battleforce, circa 1920. USN photo courtesy of Paul & Barbara Rebold. Photo i.d. courtesy of Huxley Miller.
BB-43 Tennessee 923k In the dry dock at Bremerton WA, post June 1921. Photo from the James R. Nehez, Sr. collection, courtesy of James R. Nehez, III.
BB-43 Tennessee 923k Rudder of the Tennessee (BB-43) at the dry dock, Bremerton WA, post June 1921. Photo from the James R. Nehez, Sr. collection, courtesy of James R. Nehez, III.
(BB-43/44) 260k Tennessee (BB-43) with her main guns trained to port and turret markings on her fore and aft top turrets. Circa early 1920's. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
BB-43 Tennessee 81k Tennessee (BB-43) photographed in 1922 with YC-159 alongside. Across the Pier is the Canadian Pacific Liner Empress of Austraila.
The markings on turrets II & III were bearing marks by which the ships ahead and behind in the battle line could determine on which relative bearing the main battery was training. The black strip at the waterline is the 14in-thick armor belt.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Tom Jacobs.
USN photo NH 44254, courtesy of Myron J. Smith Jr, from his book "Volunteer State Battleground", from Pictorial Histories Publishing, Missoula, Montana. Text courtesy of Warships in Profile, Volume 2, by John Wingate, Profile Publications LTD, Windsor, Berkshire, U.K.
BB-43 Tennessee1.40kKeeping the Navy at play is a serious job aboard the Tennessee (BB-43) at Gitmo, 19 November 1922. Image provided by: Library of Congress, Washington, DC.
PDF courtesy of New-York Tribune. (New York [N.Y.]) 1866-1924, 19 November 1922, Page 3, Image 63, via chroniclingamerica.loc.gov.
McNamee106kCaptain Luke R. McNamee was the commanding officer of the battleship Tennessee (BB-43) from 1923 to 1924. Under Captain McNamee the Tennessee made the fleet's highest score in gunnery for the years 1923 to 1924; she won the Efficiency Pennant for the highest combined score in gunnery and engineering in the latter year. Photo from the Library of Congress & via Bill Gonyo.
BB-43 Tennessee 782k The Shenandoah (ZR-1) flies over the Tennessee (BB-43). Photo from the James R. Nehez, Sr. collection, courtesy of James R. Nehez, III.
BB-43 Tennessee 73k The Shenandoah (ZR-1) in flight, circa 1924, during operations with the U.S. Fleet. Photographed by Browne, from the foredeck of Tennessee (BB-43). Note fire control arrangements on the battleship, among them the rangefinder atop the pilothouse and the foremast concentration dial. USNHC photo # NH 80545, courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of Captain Frank Brooks Upham.
(BB-43/44) 154k Captain Frank Brooks Upham commanded the battleship Tennessee (BB-43) from September 1924 to March 1926. He stands alongside of R. Admiral N.R. Usher.Digital ID: ggbain # 30567. Source: Library of Congress Prints and Photographs Divisio, courtesy of Bill Gonyo.
BB-43 Tennessee 47k View of the Quarter deck. Left to right: Captain Frank Brooks Upham & Cmdr J.N. Ferguson. Note the markings on the main battery. USNHC # NH 80554, courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of Captain Frank Brooks Upham.
BB-43 Tennessee 54k Stern view of the Tennessee (BB-43) with another battleship of the pre-war fleet, possibly the California (BB-44). Note the planes on the stern. Circa post 1924. USN photo courtesy of Myron J. Smith Jr, from his book "Volunteer State Battlewagon", from Pictorial Histories Publishing, Missoula, Montana.
BB-43 Tennessee 93k Tennessee (BB-43) crewmen pose with a well-hit target, after main battery gunnery practice in about 1925. USNHC # NH 80540, courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. Collection of Captain Frank Brooks Upham.
BB-43 Tennessee 43k One of Tennessee's (BB-43) boat cranes. Sitting on the deck beyond is one of the 5in/51 secondary battery and behind that is a 3in anti-aircraft gun. USN photo and text courtesy of Warships in Profile, Volume 2, by John Wingate, Profile Publications LTD, Windsor, Berkshire, U.K.
Southern Cruise90kView from the deck of a one of the battleships looking aft of the Battle Fleet and a division of cruisers from the Scouting Fleet cruise to Australia and New Zealand. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri. Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
Sam Hood 37k Night time stern view of the Tennessee (BB-43), Mississippi (BB-41), California (BB-44) and or Idaho (BB-42) in Port Jackson, Sydney, Australia, 1925. This photo is part of the Australian National Maritime Museumís Samuel J. Hood Studio Collection in Flicker.
Sam Hood (1870-1956) was a Sydney photographer with a passion for ships. His 72-year career spanned the romantic age of sail and two world wars. The photos in the collection were taken mainly in Sydney and Newcastle during the first half of the 20th century.
Photo courtesy of Pieter Bakkels.
BB-43 Tennessee2.76kU.S. Navy Vought UO-1 attached to the battleship Tennessee (BB-43) in flight. USN photo courtesy of United States Navy Aircraft Since 1911 by Gordon Swanborough and Peter M Bowers via Robert Hurst.
BB-40 New Mexico 2.44k Langley (CV-1) with Vought VE-7 aircraft on deck, at anchor off Culebra Island, Puerto Rico on 18 March 1926. In the background are 4 four-stack destroyers and a Tennessee class (BB-43 /44) battleship on the left, and two New Mexico (BB-40 /42) class battleships (center and right).
At the time, the Tennessee's are hard to tell apart. A few years later, Tennessee (BB-43) had the open bridge added around her pilothouse, and even later, California (BB-44) added the enlarged flag bridge. But in the 1922 (or so) period, they were close in config.
The New Mexico's appear to be Mississippi (BB-41) on the left (or in the center) and New Mexico (BB-40) (nearly bow-on) on the right.
The original photo was labeled "Harbinger" to show symbolically how the unimposing Langley was the first of a line of ships which eventually drove the battleship from its primary place into the background.
Photo i.d. & text in italics courtesy of Richard Jensen.
USN photo via collections.naval.aviation.museum.
Almost Unknown709kDifferent angle of the above photo: Langley (CV-1) & Battleships at anchor off Culebra Island, Puerto Rico, 18 March 1926.USN photo NARA II 80-G-185902 via courtesy of Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-43 Tennessee 180k A Vought UO-1 taking off from the stern of the Tennessee (BB-43) on 6-3-26. Text i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore.
USN photo courtesy of Paul & Barbara Rebold.
BB-45 Colorado106kThe United States Battle Fleet steaming in column off the California coast during the middle or later 1920s. The three leading ships are (in no particular order) Colorado (BB-45), Maryland (BB-46) and West Virginia (BB-48) followed by Tennessee (BB-43) and three older battleships. Photograph taken from California (BB-44).Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-695093, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-45 Colorado54kThe photo here might be on the same occasion as the above, but from a different angle. Then again maybe not. It was taken off a 16mm film. Official USN photo courtesy of periscopefilm.com.
Battlefleet44kThe U.S. battle-fleet framed through a porthole. It was taken off a 16mm film. Photo might be from the same sequence as above.Official USN photo courtesy of periscopefilm.com.
BB-43 Tennessee 96k Firing her 14"/50 main battery, during gunnery practice in the 1920s. Official USN photo USNHC # NH 84665, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-43 Tennessee 256k Tennessee (BB-43) & the Langley (CV-1) traverse the Panama Canal in the Pedro Miguel (Miraflores) Locks.
The tell-tale signs on the Tennessee are the AA battery and the secondary main battery range finder on the No. 2 Turret. I have a source which states that the secondary main battery range finder (the primary is atop the bridge) was moved from the top of Turret No. 3 to No 2 when the Type "P" catapult was added atop No. 3. By the mid 30's (exact date unknown), this rangefinder is gone. This would be around 1924 or early 1925. In 1922 the two after 5"/51 "wet" mounts on the 02 deck were replaced by 4 3"/50 AA guns. In 1928 this battery was replaced with 8 5"/25 arranged 3 guns aft of the boat davits P&S and 1 forward of the boats but aft of the forward 5"/51 "wet" mount all on the 02 deck.
What I see is the a rangefinder on the No. 2 Turret and two AA gun barrels pointing outboard abaft the boats. This together the full decked Langley gives us a rough range of 1925-1937. The questions now becomes whether the AA guns are 3" or 5". I can distinguish the 5"/51 gun forward on the 02 deck. I cannot distinguish the taller and bulkier form of a 5"/25 which should be directly abaft of it if this is post-1928. Add to that, to my eye, the AA gun barrels look too long for the snob-nosed 5"/25's. Unfortunately none of the 5"/51 are pointed out board for comparison. My opinion: 1925-1928.
USN photo courtesy of Paul & Barbara Rebold. Photo i.d. & text courtesy of Chris Hoehn.
BB-43 Tennessee 206k Tennessee (BB-43) & the Langley (CV-1) traverse the Panama Canal in the Pedro Miguel (Miraflores) Locks.
From what Chris explains, and if we take into account the relatively large number of planes aboard Langley (a consequence of CAPT Reeves being Commander, Aircraft Squadrons, Battle Fleet) and the fact that the ships are bound for the Pacific, a plausible date is circa March 1927, when the Battle Fleet returned to the West Coast after Fleet Problem VII.
USN photo courtesy of Fabio Pena.
BB-43 Tennessee 667k Tennessee (BB-43) & maybe California (BB-44) seem ready to solve a Fleet Problem. Photo courtesy of Arnie Putnam.
Photo added 06/23/15.
Battlefleet122kWatercolor of a Presidential review during President Hoover's term of office, 1928-32.
Crews line the rails of a Colorado class (BB-45 / 48) battleship as the ships pass in line astern of the reviewing stand with the airship Los Angeles (ZR-3) piercing the clouds accompanied by 9 biplanes.
Courtesy of Michael Schwarz.
Battlefleet56kView of the U.S. Battle-fleet from above, possibly from the airship Los Angeles (ZR-3). Photo courtesy of periscopefilm.com.
BB-43 Tennessee 703k Tennessee (BB-43), in March 1930. Official USN photo # 80-G-466154, now in the collections of the U.S. National Archives.
BB-43 Tennessee 60k The Tennessee (BB-43) in 1930, line drawing by A. L. Raven. Photo and text courtesy of U.S. Battleships: An Illustrated Design History by Norman Friedman.
BB-43 Tennessee 193k Memorial services aboard the battleship Tennessee (BB-43), 13 June 1931.
As if to symbolize that those who lived would carry on, these guns and airplanes aboard the ship offered a picturesque setting for memorial services recently aboard the battleship as she lay in L.A. harbor San Pedro, CA., The ceremonies were held under the auspices of the American Legion of San Pedro with Captain C.E. Courtney, Commander of Tennessee officiating.
Associated Press text & photo courtesy of San Francisco Examiner via David S. Smith.
Tennessee269kThe top turret of Tennessee (BB-43) is marked with a (43) as she lays with a slight wisp of smoke in oil slicked waters. USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
Tennessee126kThe Tennessee (BB-43) passes a tree in a photo reminiscent of Tai Sing Loo.USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-34 New York413k New York (BB-34) ahead of Pennsylvania (BB-38). The next ship ahead is a Tennessee class (BB-43 /44) based on the slope of the turret roofs. (Uniform slope back to front - no kink like the twin 16" mounts on the Colorado's (BB-45). Based on the relatively full appearance of the forward superstructure, I am leaning toward California (BB-44) which had an enlarged flag bridge as Battle Force Flagship. The other three are obviously Tennessee (BB-43) and/or Colorado class (BB-45 / 48) but are too indistinct to ID specifically. Because of the boom cranes on the sterns, the photo was taken between 1931 and 1934. Photo courtesy of Kerry Garrett.
Photo & text i.d. courtesy of Richard M. Jensen.
BB-40 New Mexico 88k Four photos for the 1933 400 KW Turbine Gear Generator Sets for the battleships:
New Mexico (BB-40), Mississippi (BB-41), Idaho (BB-42), Tennessee (BB-43) & Colorado (BB-45).
Figure 1
Figure 2
Figure 5
Figure 4
Photos courtesy of Ed Zajkowski.
BB-44 475k California (BB-44) or Tennessee (BB-43) visits the Boston Navy yard, circa mid 1930's. Photo 08_06_022495 courtesy of the Boston Public Library, Leslie Jones Collection via Sean Hert & flickr.com.
BB-39 Arizona703kArizona (BB-39) in 1930's, maneuvering at sea astern of Tennessee (BB-43) and Texas (BB-35) (in lead). USN photo courtesy Pieter Bakels.
BB-48 West Virginia272kThe West Virginia (BB-48) as flagship for the Commander, Battleship Divisions, Battle Fleet, followed by other battleships steaming in line ahead during the middle through later 1920's.
The aircraft on the turret catapult appears to be a Curtiss SOC (I can't make out the stern aircraft.), so the date has to be mid-to-later 1930s.
The four leading ships behind her are (in no particular order) Colorado (BB-45), Maryland (BB-46), California (BB-44) & Tennessee (BB-43).
Text i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore.
Photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-44 California105k Tennessee (BB-43) or California (BB-44) class battleship in San Diego Harbor circa 1936.Fairchild Air Survey photo courtesy of Cliff Boan.
(BB-43/44) 141k One of Tennessee's (BB-43) crewmen ascending or descending the anchor chain, 1937. Associated Press wire photo courtesy of San Francisco Examiner via David S. Smith.
(BB-43/44) 152k Tugs help to push the Tennessee (BB-43) from being stuck in mud flats, 1937. Associated Press wire photo courtesy of San Francisco Examiner via David S. Smith.
BB-43 Tennessee 173k The tug boat Sea King rounds the stern of the grounded Tennessee (BB-43) in an attempt to push her off the mud flats, 1937. Associated Press wire photo courtesy of San Francisco Examiner via David S. Smith.
BB-43 Tennessee 252k The Tennessee (BB-43) Communication Dept. group photo, 1937, Bremerton, Washington. Five page PDF. Photos courtesy of Greg Alexander.
BB-43 Tennessee 957k Pre war bow & starboard quarter & broadside views of the Tennessee (BB-43). Photo from the collection of Carrie Schmidt.
BB-43 Tennessee 38k Curtiss SOC-3 scout-observation float-planes (Bureau #s 1077, at center, and probably 1076, to the right). Parked on the after catapult of Tennessee (BB-43), circa 1938. These aircraft belong to Observation Squadron Two (VO-2B), whose insignia is painted on the fuselage below the upper wing. USNHC # NH 68890, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-43 Tennessee 61k Tennessee (BB-43) in harbor, circa 1938. Two SOC-3 float-planes, of Observation Squadron Two (VO-2B), are parked on the battleship's after catapult. A third is atop gun turret # 3. USNHC # NH 68891, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-43 Tennessee 117k At sea during the later 1930s. Official USN photo USNHC # NH 97316, now in the collections of the National Archives.
(BB-43/44) 183k Tennessee's (BB-43) band poses for a group shot in her mid life era. USN photo courtesy of Robert M. Cieri.
(BB-43/44) 531k N.Y., 13 April 1939. "Guardian of liberty passes its symbol."
Majestic in dawn's early light, the battleship Tennessee (BB-43), Rear Admiral A.E. Watson's flagship is shown as she steamed into N.Y. harbor past the Statue of Liberty today. Tennessee is the first ship of the line to arrive for review in connection of the opening of the N.Y. World's Fair. She will rejoin the Fleet for maneuvers off Virginia capes, then join the parade up the Atlantic coast to N.Y.
A.P. Wirephoto from the collection of Michael Strout, courtesy of Jonathan Eno.
BB-35 Texas177kN.Y. 29 April 1939. "Fleet steams up Hudson".
Thirty seven vessels of the Atlantic Squadron steamed through N.Y. harbor and up the Hudson River today as part of the ceremonies connected with tomorrow's opening of the World Fair. This striking picture made from the deck of the New York (BB-34) flagship, shows the Texas (BB-35) followed by the Tennessee (BB-43).
A.P. Wirephoto from the collection of Michael Strout, courtesy of Jonathan Eno.
BB-43 Tennessee 157k Curtiss SOC-3 scout-observation floatplanes parked on the after catapult of Tennessee (BB-43), 1940 on the Hudson river. USN photo courtesy of Myron J. Smith Jr, from his book "Volunteer State Battlewagon", from Pictorial Histories Publishing, Missoula, Montana.
BB-39 Arizona43k Arizona (BB-39) leading Nevada (BB-36) and the Tennessee (BB-43) and a New Mexico class battleship underway. USN photo from the Atlas Editions. Submitted by Eric W. Dahlstrom.
BB-43 Tennessee2.10kTennessee (BB-43) sails the bay with part of her crew lined up for inspection on the starboard side. USN photo courtesy of Jim Millholland via Alan Cole.
BB-40 New Mexico & family463kProbable front and rear photos here and below showing formations of aircraft flying over U.S. Navy battleships during exercises at sea, circa late 1930's - 1940.
Pictured here is a New Mexico (BB-40 /42) class battleship in the van with other battleships of the Pacific Fleet and a carrier air group, led by the Air Group Commander in a Curtiss SBC Helldiver.
The aircraft following are:
A torpedo squadron of eighteen Douglas TBD-1s;
A bombing squadron of eighteen Northrop BT-1s;
A scouting squadron eighteen Curtiss SBCs;
A fighting squadron of eighteen Grumman F2F-1s or F3F-3s from either the Yorktown (CV-5) or F3F-2s from the Enterprise (CV-6), plus possibly nine additional aircraft.
The Yorktown and Enterprise were the only two carriers whose bombing squadrons were equipped with the Northrop BT-1.
The text for the photo reads:
"The Navy uses enormous amounts of rubber. At least seventy-five tons of rubber, enough to makes 17,000 tires, are used in the construction of each of these battleships. Tons more are needed for the naval planes that are making history over the world. Medical and communication requirements--and countless other needs of the Navy--are met."
The lead BB looks like Mississippi (BB-41) followed by Maryland (BB-46) (rangefinder on Turret II). My first impression of the Tennessee class (BB-43 /44) is the Tennessee (BB-43), but that is not a certain ID from this photo alone. Fourth is the Oklahoma (BB-37) (no birdbath). Aside from the DD now in the lead, I see nothing in the head-on shot aerial that positively differs from the ID's of the first 4 BB's in the first photo. Of course, in the aft aerial shot, BB #5 is the California (BB-44), ID'd by the enlarged flag bridge, lending support to BB #3 in the first photo being Tennessee. Everything I see supports these three photos all being part of the same operation with at least the first 5 BB's remaining in the same order.
Photograph # LC-USE64 - DC-000944 & partial text courtesy of memory.loc.gov.
Battleship i.d. & text courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Aircraft i.d. & text & timeline courtesy of Alan Moore via the following sources: Airplane i.d.: Yorktown Class Carriers (Warship Pictorial No. 9) by Steve Wiper, Tucson, AZ: Classic Warships Publishing, 2000. & That Gallant Ship: U.S.S. Yorktown (CV-5) by Robert Cressman, Missoula, MT: Pictorial Histories Pub Co, 1985. Timeline from Battleship Arizona: An Illustrated History by Paul Stillwell, Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1991.
BB-40 New Mexico & family1.62kProbable front and rear photos here and above showing formations of aircraft flying over U.S. Navy battleships during exercises at sea, circa late 1930's - 1940.
In both photos, one of the New Mexico (BB-40 / 42) is leading the BB column while the remaining battleships have dual masthead fire control structures.
The air group formation in the two photos appears to be similar. The composition of 18 TBDs, 18 BT-1s, 18 SBCs, and 27 fighters is easier to distinguish in the front/surface view. I'm assuming, based on total aircraft count alone, that the formation in the rear/aerial view is the same. (The perspective makes it difficult to sort the monoplanes and biplanes into their respective types.) The only difference is that in the front/surface view the formation is lead by a Curtiss SBC Helldiver (likely the Air Group Commander) but in the rear/aerial view that lead Helldiver is not present. I suppose it's possible that the photographer was in that Helldiver's rear seat. What stands out for me is the presence of nine extra fighters beyond the normal squadron composition of 18, as seen in the other three squadrons in this formation.
Photo i.d courtesy of Chuck Haberlein, Richard Jensen, Aryeh Wetherhorn, & Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
Battleship i.d. & text courtesy of Richard Jensen.
Aircraft i.d. & text courtesy of Alan Moore.
US Navy and Marine Corps Museum/Naval Aviation Museum, photo No. 2008.104.001.234.
BB-39 Arizona1.31kBetween 9 & 13 September 1940 the Arizona (BB-39) was under way with other ships of the US Fleet for simulated fleet engagement. She is pictured here in company with other ships of the Pacific Fleet taken during Fleet Ops. and at least one carrier air group.Scanned from: "The Fleet Today" by Kendall Banning. Funk & Wagnalls Company, N.Y. and London, 1942. Submitted by Pieter Bakels.
Text & photo i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore via Battleship Arizona: An Illustrated History by Paul Stillwell, Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1991.
BB-39 Arizona1.31kBetween 9 & 13 September 1940 the Arizona (BB-39) was under way with other ships of the US Fleet for simulated fleet engagement. She is pictured here in company with other ships of the Pacific Fleet taken during Fleet Ops. and at least one carrier air group.Scanned from: "The Fleet Today" by Kendall Banning. Funk & Wagnalls Company, N.Y. and London, 1942. Submitted by Pieter Bakels.
Text & photo i.d. courtesy of Alan Moore via Battleship Arizona: An Illustrated History by Paul Stillwell, Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 1991.
BB-38 Pennsylvania70kCaptain Jonas H. Ingram commanded the battleship Tennessee (BB-43) from July 1940 to December 1940. Photo from the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library & submitted by Bill Gonyo.
Attack on Pearl Harbor
Hit 399k Photograph taken from a Japanese plane during the torpedo attack on ships moored on both sides of Ford Island shortly after the beginning of the Pearl Harbor attack. View looks about east, with the supply depot, submarine base and fuel tank farm in the right center distance. A torpedo has just hit West Virginia (BB-48) on the far side of Ford Island (center). Other battleships moored nearby are (from left): Nevada (BB-36), Arizona (BB-39), Tennessee (BB-43) (inboard of West Virginia), Oklahoma (BB-37) (torpedoed and listing) alongside Maryland (BB-46), and California (BB-44). On the near side of Ford Island, to the left, are light cruisers Detroit (CL-8) and Raleigh (CL-7), target and training ship Utah (BB-31) and seaplane tender Tangier (AV-8). Raleigh and Utah have been torpedoed, and Utah is listing sharply to port. Japanese planes are visible in the right center (over Ford Island) and over the Navy Yard at right. U.S. Navy planes on the seaplane ramp are on fire. Japanese writing in the lower right states that the photograph was reproduced by authorization of the Navy Ministry. Text courtesy of wikipedia.com.
Official U.S. Navy photograph NH 50930.
Hit 2.92k Japanese photo of Battleship Row during 7 December attack.
Note the oil spilling out from bomb & toroedo hits in the first few minutes. From left to right: Nevada (BB-36), Vestal (AR-4) (outboard), Arizona (BB-39), West Virginia (BB-48) (outboard), Tennessee (BB-43), Oklahoma (BB-37) (outboard), Maryland (BB-46), & Neosho (AO-23) forward.
Photo courtesy of Arnold Putnam.
Hit 1.01k Japanese post card of bombers over Pearl Harbor, 7 December 1941. Photo courtesy of Arnold Putnam.
Hit 3.24k Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor - Hickam Field. Photo courtesy of Arnold Putnam.
BB-48 West Virginia120kSailors in a motor launch rescue a survivor from the water alongside the sunken West Virginia (BB-48) during or shortly after the Japanese air raid on Pearl Harbor. Tennessee (BB-43) is inboard of the sunken battleship. Note extensive distortion of West Virginia's lower midships superstructure, caused by torpedoes that exploded below that location. Also note 5"/25 gun, still partially covered with canvas, boat crane swung outboard and empty boat cradles near the smokestacks, and base of radar antenna atop West Virginia's foremast. Official USN photo USNHC # C-5904, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-48 West Virginia109kAttack on Pearl Harbor, 7 December 1941: West Virginia (BB-48) sunk at anchor after her fires were put out. Her OS2U plane upside down on her deck with another plane burned out on the catapult. Tennessee (BB-43) is inboard. Note radar on West Virginia's foremast. National Archives photo # 80-G-19945.
BB-39 Arizona610kAftermath of the Japanese sneak attack on these three stricken U.S. battleships; from left to right: West Virginia (BB-48) (severely damaged), Tennessee (BB-43) (damaged), and the Arizona (BB-39) (sunk).NARA #(NLR-PHOCO-A-65458) courtesy of fdrlibrary.marist.edu
BB-37 Oklahoma 86k Oil on canvas painting by the artist Tom Freeman entitled "Last Torpedo". The Oklahoma (BB-37) starts to capsize. The ship had no watertight integrity, as all portholes and watertight doors were open for Captain's inspection when the Japanese attacked. Maryland (BB-46) is at left, and Tennessee (BB-43) is behind and to the left of the Oklahoma, and West Virginia (BB-48) is directly behind her and sinking. Photo and partial text courtesy of oldgloryprints.com
The Raid on Pearl Harbor63kOil on canvas painting by the artist Ivan Berryman entitled "The Raid on Pearl Harbor, 7th December 1941 ", depicting the view across 'Battleship Row', viewed from above Ford Island as the Nevada (BB-36) gallantly makes her break for the open sea, coming under heavy attack from Japanese A6M2s from the carrier Hiryu. The Nevada was eventually too badly damaged to continue and was beached to avoid blocking the harbour entrance. In the immediate foreground, the lightly damaged Tennessee (BB-43) is trapped inboard of West Virginia (BB-48) which has sunk at her moorings, leaking burning oil and hampering the daring operations to pluck trapped crew members from her decks, while just visible to the right is the stern of the Maryland (BB-46) and the capsized Oklahoma (BB-37). Photo and partial text courtesy of military-art.com.
BB-48 West Virginia92kWith help from the crew of the Tern (AM-31), the fires aboard the sunken West Virginia (BB-48) are slowly being extinguished. Note radar antenna, paravanes and 16"/45 twin gun turrets on the battleship.National Archives photo # NH 64477.
BB-48 West Virginia85kSmall craft standing by West Virginia (BB-48) as burning oil drifts past the sunken battleship, shortly after the end of the Japanese air raid. Tennessee (BB-43) is moored on West Virginia's starboard side. Both ships are shrouded in smoke from the burning Arizona (BB-39), out of view to the right.National Archives # NH 94379.
BB-48 West Virginia102kThis photo shows the fires being fought on the sunken battleship West Virginia (BB-48), 7 December 1941. The garbage lighter YG-17 is at right, with her crewmen playing two fire hoses at the flames. Assisting or standing by are a motor launch and an officer's motorboat. Tennessee (BB-43) is inboard of West Virginia .
An OS2U floatplane (marked "4-O-3") is upside down on West Virginia's main deck. A second OS2U is partially burned out atop the Turret # 3 catapult. Note radar antenna atop West Virginia's foremast.
Official USN photo # 80-G-19947, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-43 Tennessee 99k Tennessee (BB-43), at left, alongside the sunken West Virginia (BB-48), photographed from the capsized hull of Oklahoma (BB-37) on 10 December 1941, three days after the Japanese raid. The mainmast of Arizona (BB-39) is visible in the right distance. USNHC # NH 50770, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-48 West Virginia2.57kThe West Virginia (BB-48) showing collapsed gun deck, with the Tennessee (BB-43) inboard. Photograph taken 10 December 1941. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-48 West Virginia86kThe West Virginia (BB-48) on the left, 3/4 rear view showing general damage, with the Tennessee (BB-43) on the right. Photograph taken 10 December 1941. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-43 Tennessee24k Cover of the Bomb Damage - Pearl Harbor, December 7, 1941 Report of the Tennessee (BB-43).Photo from WII War Damage Reports, courtesy of NavSea / dcfp.navy.mil, link submitted by Mike Green.
BB-43 Tennessee118k Map I showing the location of the of the Tennessee (BB-43) and bomb impact damage during the attack on Pearl Harbor.Photo from WII War Damage Reports, courtesy of NavSea / dcfp.navy.mil, link submitted by Mike Green.
BB-43 Tennessee363k Map II showing the location of the of the Tennessee (BB-43) and bomb impact damage during the attack on Pearl Harbor.Photo from WII War Damage Reports, courtesy of NavSea / dcfp.navy.mil, link submitted by Mike Green.
Tennessee & Arizona84k Tennessee (BB-43) & Arizona (BB-39) with fires still burning. Note the fire hoses playing over the stern of Tennessee to wash burning oil away. Photo from WII War Damage Reports, courtesy of NavSea / dcfp.navy.mil, link submitted by Mike Green.
BB-43 Tennessee75k Top of turret III looking down through the hole in the catapult at the opening through which the bomb penetrated. Photo source "Seattle NARA, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Ships files, 1940-50" submitted by Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-43 Tennessee104k Top of turret III showing the point of impact on plate "A".Photo source "Seattle NARA, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Ships files, 1940-50" submitted by Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-43 Tennessee113k Inside turret III showing the hole in the catapult, the tear in plate "A" and the severed rangefinder tube.Photo from WII War Damage Reports, courtesy of NavSea / dcfp.navy.mil, link submitted by Mike Green.
BB-43 Tennessee144k Inside turret III under the point of impact looking forward th the front of the turret, and showing the tear in plate "A" and the broken transverse girder under plate "B".Photo from WII War Damage Reports, courtesy of NavSea / dcfp.navy.mil, link submitted by Mike Green.
BB-43 Tennessee136kCenter gun of Turret II showing the hole gouged out by the bomb and the crack in "C" hoop.Photo source "Seattle NARA, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Ships files, 1940-50" submitted by Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-43 Tennessee143k Right and center gun of Turret II. Note the coaming around the right gun port partly blown off by the explosion.Photo source "Seattle NARA, Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Ships files, 1940-50" submitted by Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-43 Tennessee800kTennessee (BB-43) sometime after early February 1942 when her first post-Pearl Harbor mods were done. Wide World photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-43 Tennessee 245k Tennessee (BB-43) overhead bow view. Puget Sound Navy Yard. 19 February 1942. USN photo # 398-42 courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-43 Tennessee 386k Tennessee (BB-43) at the Puget Sound Navy Yard on February 1942. Note that her cage-mainmast has been removed and that her 5-Inch guns have received splinter shields.
The time to replace the mainmast was taken due to the fact that the ship had to have her main battery regunned; if it hadn't been for that, she would have had her mast cut down in a similar fashion to that of the Maryland (BB-46) and Colorado (BB-45).
USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-43 Tennessee 139k Tennessee (BB-43) before her major rebuild. Photo i.d. courtesy of Ron Balko & Ronald J. Nash.
USN photo courtesy of "Warships in Profile, Volume 2," by John Wingate, Profile Publications LTD, Windsor, Berkshire, U.K.
BB-43 Tennessee 335k Overhead view, looking aft. Taken at Puget Sound Navy Yard on 19 February 1942 where she had her mainmast replaced by a tower structure that had already been fabricated before her arrival from Pearl Harbor. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-43 Tennessee 63k Tennessee (BB-43) at Puget Sound Navy Yard 26 February 1942 following her major refit. Note the barrage ballons over the harbor. USN photo courtesy of Seattle NARA # RG-181, submitted by Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large.
BB-43 Tennessee 900k The overhead view shows the ship in June, 1942 entering San Pedro Harbor and shows the addition of two quadruple 1.1"/75 caliber A.A. mounts in place on the main deck just forward of #3 turret. National Archives photo # N-3141A, courtesy of David Buell.
BB-43 Tennessee 44k From 20 June 1942 until 6 March 1944, Commodore Robert Stevenson Haggart was in command of Tennessee (BB-43). Under his command the Tennessee moved early in June, 1943 to Aleutian waters where it held extensive patrols in the northern waters. The following months, the ship sailed to Kiska as one of the vessels of the softening up bombardment, and when the troops were landed, the ship returned undamaged. Tennessee then participated in the Gilberts, Tarawa, Kwajalein and Marshall Islands Operations during World War II. For his service as commanding officer of Tennessee during the assault and capture of Eniwetok Atol, Marshall Islands, from February 17 to 23, 1944, he received a Letter of Commendation from the commander-in-chief, Pacific Fleet, with authorization to wear the commendation ribbon. He was also entitled to the Naval Unit Commendation awarded the officers and men of Tennessee. Photo from the San Diego Navy Historical Association via Bill Gonyo.
BB-43 Tennessee 40k This view from dead ahead shows how the additional blisters to Tennessee's (BB-43) sides were added during rebuild in 1942-43 were faired into the bows. USN photo and text courtesy of "Warships in Profile, Volume 2," by John Wingate, Profile Publications LTD, Windsor, Berkshire, U.K.
BB-43 Tennessee 92k Drawing prepared by the Bureau of Ships for Camouflage Measure 32v1, Design 1D intended for the battleship Tennessee (BB-43), circa 1943. This plan shows the ship's starboard side and exposed decks. Official USN photo # 80-G-157055, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-43 Tennessee 58k Drawing prepared by the Bureau of Ships for Camouflage Measure 32v1, Design 1D intended for the battleship Tennessee (BB-43), circa 1943. This plan shows the ship's port side. Official USN photo # 80-G-157054, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-43 Tennessee 137k Tennessee (BB-43) at Puget Sound Navy Yard. 25 April, 1943, topside, port, at time of inclining experiment. USN photo courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-43 Tennessee 132k Tennessee (BB-43) at Puget Sound Navy Yard on 25 April, 1943, topside, port, forward, at time of inclining experiment. USN photo courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-43 Tennessee 318k May 1943 photo. Radars either have not been equipped or have been erased by the censors. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-43 Tennessee 250k Tennessee (BB-43) Plan view, amidships of BK, BL-2,Mk.4,Mk.8,SC-2 and SG radar antennas. Note GFCS. Mk.49 just fwd.of her port Mk.37 Director. Puget Sound Navy Yard. 1 May, 1943. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-43 Tennessee 186k Tennessee (BB-43) at Puget Sound Navy Yard, 8 May 1943, one day after the completion of being completely rebuilt at Puget Sound Navy Yard. The ship was included in the refit program authorized for her salvaged sister, California (BB-44). The ship is wearing measure MS21 camouflage scheme. USN photo # 1227-43, courtesy of Mike Green.
BB-43 Tennessee 768k Tennessee (BB-43) 12 May 1943 off Port Angeles, Wash. USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-43 Tennessee 752k Tennessee (BB-43) not long after her post-Pearl Harbor repairs. Can you make out whether the OS2Us have red dots in the stars? I think they are there, but the photo is somewhat washed out.
However, the other marking that went away from Navy aircraft in April/May 1942 (note that Lexington's (CVA-2) and Yorktown's (CVA-5) air groups still carried the red during Coral Sea) was the red and white stripes on the rudder. The fleet painted out these as well as the red centers in May, though the markings tended to bleed through the paint out after it bleached out in the sun. In the photo, the aircraft sitting on the main deck port side shows the rudder to be slighter lighter than the vertical stabilizer. This could be the over-exposed rudder markings or a slight difference in the angle of the rudder. Another hint is the size of the wing insignia, at some point these markings were enlarged to the full cord of the wing plus the four place location on the wings (rather than just one top and one bottom) I need to dig through resource I don't have here to check that data. My initial opinion is that there are no red markings on the aircraft but that this is still early probably April to August 1942. I'll revise that if I find something to change or confirm this opinion.
The return of the national insignia on both upper & lower wing tips, as well as both sides of the fuselage, and the addition of red & white rudder stripes appears in a message from Commander-in-Chief, Pacific, 23 December 1941. (Elliott p62.)
The directive for the large national insignia (full cord or maximum diameter possible without overflowing onto the aileron) was contained in a Bureau of Aeronautics letter of 5 January 1942. (Elliott p66-67, Doll p19).
The red circle deleted from the national insignia and red & white stripes deleted from rudders appeared in May 1942 (6 May in Elliott p67, 15 May in Dole p19.)
The wing insignia reverted to upper left and lower right positions in SR-2c Specification for Exterior Colors, Insignia and Marking of Naval Aircraft dated 5 January 1943, effective 1 February 1943. (Elliott p69, Doll p41.), so that would be your outside dates for these aircraft.
USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
Text i.d. courtesy of Chris Hoehn & Alan Moore..
Sources:Doll, Thomas E. US Navy Aircraft Camouflage and Markings 1940-1945. Carrollton, TX: Squadron/Signal Publications, 2003.
Elliott, John M. The Official Monogram U.S. Navy and Marine Corps Aircraft Color Guide, Vol 2: 1940-1949, second edition. Sturbridge: Monogram Aviation Publications, 1998.
Photo source courtesy of Alan Moore..
BB-43 Tennessee 156k May 1943 photo of the Tennessee (BB-43) as rebuilt and on post refit trials. Not a flattering shot for a lady with a wide beam, but it readily shows the "new" hull design that was also applied to the California (BB-44) and West Virginia (BB-48). USN photo.
BB-43 Tennessee 341k Tennessee (BB-43) early after her Bremerton rebuild. Sort of an ordinary photo of her, but at-sea photos in this period and in this rig of her are not so common. USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-43 Tennessee 1.70k Tennessee meets Alaska on 20 July 1943. She appears here at anchor in Iliuliuk Bay. US National Archives photo # 19l-CM 200158 from NARA, College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-43 Tennessee 64k Tennessee class (BB-43 /44) line drawing, 11/43. Courtesy of Joe Radigan.
BB-43 Tennessee 99k Oil painting of the Tennessee (BB-43) underway in 1943. Photograph courtesy of Jacobo Ruiz.
BB-46 Maryland88k Maryland (BB-46) follows Tennessee (BB-43), in mid-Pacific, November 1943. Originally near sisters, note difference in beam and silhouette. Photo and text courtesy of U.S. Warships of W.W. II by Paul H. Silverman, submitted by Robert Hurst.
BB-43 Tennessee 208k A painting by the artist Wayne Scarpaci entitled "Early evening." depicting the Tennessee (BB-43) arriving at NAS North Island, San Diego, CA. sometime in early 1944. Drawing courtesy of artbywayne.com.
BB-43 Tennessee 423k Bow view of Tennessee (BB-43) behind torpedo nets, taken off of San Francisco right after being painted up in camouflage measure 32, 11 January 1944. BuShips photo # 57657 courtesy of David Buell.
BB-43 Tennessee 595k Interesting aerial shot of Tennessee (BB-43) at San Francisco wearing camouflage measure 32, 11 January 1944. BuShips photo # 57660 courtesy of David Buell.
BB-43 Tennessee 422k Broadside photo taken off of San Francisco in camouflage measure 32, 11 January 1944. BuShips photo # 57655 courtesy of David Buell.
BB-43 Tennessee 1.19k The arial photo was taken by a Airship ZP-31 dated 13 January 1944 as Task Force 53 left San Pedro for Pearl Harbor and then on to the invasion of the Marshall Islands. Tennessee (BB-43) is seen with the amphibious attack group which includes a CVE, and LSD and various C2 and C3 amphibious ships. USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-43 Tennessee 323k Tennessee (BB-43) shelling city of Garapan and Tanapag Harbor Saipan, in Marianas, 21 June 1944. USN photo # 80G-238461 from National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-43 Tennessee 450k A camouflaged Tennessee (BB-43) and escorting destroyer are anchored offshore in 1944. USN photo courtesy of David Buell.
BB-43 Tennessee 75k Bombarding Japanese positions on Guam, 19 July 1944. Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-K-14224, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-43 Tennessee 317k Bombardment of Anguar, circa 15 September 1944. Three U.S. Navy ships of Task Group 32.12 are visible (l-r): the battleship Tennessee (BB-43), wearing camouflage Measure 32 Design 1D; LST-689; and the heavy cruiser Minneapolis (CA-36), which wore a unique camouflage that should give her the silhouette of a destroyer. USN photo courtesy of Robert Hurst.
Photo added 06/23/15.
BB-43 Tennessee 91k Oil on canvas by the artist William F. Draper entitled "Boxing Match".
On the way to Saipan, the ship's company of the Tennessee (BB-43) gathers to watch a boxing match between two enlisted men.
Courtesy of the Naval Historical Foundation. "Boxing Match" William F. Draper #104 Oil on canvas, November 1944 40 1/4h" x 46w" 88-189-DS.
BB-43 Tennessee 389k Bow view, starboard side of the Tennessee (BB-43) at Puget Sound Navy Yard, 25 January 1945. Bureau of Ships photos # 78466 courtesy of David Buell.
BB-43 Tennessee 270k The Tennessee's (BB-43) 5"/51 reach for the sky in this photo taken some time after her last refit at Puget Sound Navy Yard, 25 January 1945. National Archives, # N-3136 courtesy of David Buell.
Photo i.d. courtesy of David C. Nilsen, CTR USA, TRADOC.
BB-43 Tennessee 76k Oil on canvas painting by the artist Anthony Saunders entitled "Tennessee (BB-43) During the Landings at Iwo Jima."
In February 1945, 850 square miles of volcanic rock became the most strategically important island in the South Pacific. From Iwo Jima heavy bombers would be able to raid Japanese cities almost at will. Even with its overwhelming military might, the Americans would have to pay a heavy price for such a seemingly small island. The battleship New York (BB-34) is behind the Tennessee
Text and drawing courtesy of naval-art.com
Iwo Jima76k Photo taken from Vicksburg (CL-86) of the battleships Idaho (BB-42), Tennessee (BB-43), and New York (BB-34) (on right), during the bombardment of Iwo Jima, February 1945. Courtesy of modelwarships.com & submitted by Joesph Macdonald.
BB-43 Tennessee 410k Tennessee (BB-43) anchored at Saipan. Flight deck crew of Sargent Bay (CVE-83) in foreground, 13 February 1945. USN photo # 80G-321504 from National Archives and Records Administration (NARA), College Park, Maryland, courtesy of Sean Hert.
BB-43 Tennessee 65k Initial waves of amphibious tractors (LVT) head for the landing beaches on Iwo Jima's southeastern coast, at about 0900 Hrs. on 19 February 1945. Tennessee (BB-43) is at left. Photographed from an airplane based on Makin Island (CVE-93). Official USN photo # 80-G-310951, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-43 Tennessee 717k Tennessee (BB-43) and the Invasion Fleet off Iwo Jima. Note LVTs and LCIs maneouvering near to Tennessee. USN photo from the North Carolina (BB-55) World War II cruise book courtesy of Robert Hurst.
BB-43 Tennessee 48k A battleship, probably Tennessee (BB-43) bombarding Iwo Jima prior to the initial landings, circa 19 February 1945. Mount Suribachi is in the left center, beyond the battleship, with a huge explosion at its base.
Original 35mm Kodachrome transparency, photographed by Lieutenant Howard W. Whalen, USNR, Boat Group Commander, Sanborn (APA-193).
U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph # NH 104355-KN. Collection of Lieutenant Commander Howard W. Whalen, USNR. Donated by Mrs. Nadine Whalen, 1997.
BB-43 Tennessee 128k Bombarding Okinawa with her 14"/50 main battery guns, as LVTs in the foreground carry troops to the invasion beaches, 1 April 1945. USNHC # NH 42390, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-40 New Mexico 70k At sea with two other battleships and an amphibious force command ship (AGC), probably at the time of the Iwo Jima or Okinawa operations, circa February-April 1945. Battleship in the center background is Idaho (BB-42). The one further to the left is Tennessee (BB-43). Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-K-3706, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-43 Tennessee 23k Damage from a kamikaze attack on the Tennessee (BB-43), 12 April 1945 off the coast of Okinawa.Photo from WW II Damage Reports, courtesy of NavSea / dcfp.navy.mil.
BB-43 Tennessee 174k Tennessee (BB-43) beside the repair ship Ajax (AR-6) on 8 May 1945, undergoing repairs to her starboard side gun mounts after a kamikaze struck the ship on 12 April 1945. Photo taken by Hamp Law from the backseat of OS2U Kingfisher number 22 as they were doing a fly-by of the ship. Photo & text courtesy of Model Warships submitted by Mike Green.
BB-43 Tennessee 51k Tennessee (BB-43) pitching in heavy seas, while operating in the Pacific Ocean, 1945. Official USN photo # NH 104440, now in the collections of the National Archives. Collection of Rear Admiral Calvin T. Durgin, USN, donated by his Daughter, Mrs. Phyllis Sherrill, 1972.
BB-43 Tennessee397kTennessee (BB-43) about to show some southern hospitality to her new neighbors.USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels.
BB-36, 43 & 4482kPearl Harbor Veterans, the Tennessee (BB-43), California (BB-44) and Nevada (BB-36) steam out of Buckner Bay, Okinawa on 17 July 1945. All had been sunk or damaged during the attack on Pearl Harbor.USN photo.
BB-43 Tennessee 124k In Buckner Bay, Okinawa, 17 July 1945. Taken by a Makin Island (CVE-93) photographer. Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-326899, now in the collections of the National Archives.
BB-43 Tennessee1.30kPHILADELPHIA, December 7. BATTLESHIP TENNESSEE (BB-43) COMES HOME - Four years after Pearl Harbor, the battleship Tennessee which survived two bomb hits in the sneak attack arrived home today after a 15,000 mile journey from Tokyo Bay. A tug pushes the ship up the Delaware to the Philadelphia Navy yard.A.P. Wire photo courtesy of David Buell.
Philadelphia Naval Shipyard667kPhoto taken from Bldg. 620 of Drydock # 5 at Philadelphia Naval Shipyard.
The Tennessee (BB-43) in the foreground and the fore section of the California (BB-44) outboard at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard sometime after 8 May 1946. Note that they are both still flying their ensigns and jacks, so both are still in commission. The South Dakota (BB-57) is in the left background.
Across the pier past the California are two 4-stack crusiers of the Omaha class. Stripping is apparently underway on the CLs, with at least one smokestack (on the nearest -- inboard -- ship) removed. Some of the stacks on the outboard ship are hidden behind those of the inboard ship.
It appears that the cruisers might be painted in measure MS-21 camouflage, but only two appear to have ended the war in this pattern: Detroit (CL-8) and Trenton (CL-11).
Seven of these crusiers were decommissioned and sold for scrap at the Phila. Navy Yard:
(1) Omaha (CL-4) scrapped beginning 2/46. (MS-22) dated 1945.
(2) Cincinnati (CL-6) scrapping beginning 2/27/46. (MS-22) dated 1945.
(3) Raleigh (CL-7) scrapping beginning 2/27/46. (MS32/1D) dated 1944.
(4) Detroit scrapping beginning 2/27/46. (MS22 & MS21) dated 1945.
(5) Concord (CL-10) scrapping beginning 2/27/47. (MS33/2F) dated 1944.
(6) Trenton (CL-11) scrapping beginning 12/29/46. (MS21) dated 1945.
(7) Marblehead (CL-12) scrapping beginning 2/27/46.(MS22) dated 1945.
It is possible that the outboard cruiser (further from the camera) may not be in measure 21. The stack appears a bit lighter and that would mean cruisers in measure 22 would also have to be included. Note that #4 stack of the outboard cruiser is obscured by #3 of the inboard ship (which also looks a little bit lighter?). In any case both Richmond (CL-9) and Memphis (CL-13) would also have to be considered. This is especially true since Richmond was in MS 21 in late 1945.
Also in the background is the former Olympia (ex-C-6) (IX-40).
Notice the flatcar going to the storage yards on other side of the lift bridge to Bldg. 750. It is full of single barrel 20mm A.A. mounts is in the foreground on the train/trolley tracks.
USN photo courtesy of Pieter Bakels. Partial text and photo i.d. and a lot of homework courtesy of Mike Green, Aryeh Wetterhorn, Chuck Haberlein, Tracy White @ Researcher @ Large. & Joe Lewis & Ron Reeves (HTC) USNR (ret.)
Philadelphia Naval Shipyard330k California (BB-44) in the foreground and the fore section of the Tennessee (BB-43) outboard at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard sometime after 8 May 1946. USN photo courtesy of floatingdrydock.com. & submitted by David Buell. Photo i.d. courtesy of Joe Lewis.
Philadelphia Naval Shipyard102kBattleships in dry-dock; Tennessee (BB-43) & California (BB-44) taken between 8 May and 27 October 1946.
This photo comes from the U.S.Naval Institute and has an accompanying photocopy identifying all of the surrounding ships.
It does identify the two cruisers as Detroit (CL-8) (inboard) and Trenton (CL-11)(outboard). It also identifies two returned U.K. DEs: HMS Rupert (DE-96) outboard of Olympia (ex-C-6) (IX-40), and HMS Berry (DE-3) ahead of the cruisers, and visible in the California's photo (it's still wearing its British hull #--K312).
The Naval Institute photo was taken at a later date, as more of the "packaging" on the two battleships had been completed.
According to Tennessee's deck logs, she entered Drydock #5 with California on 8 May 1946.
South Dakota (BB-57) (mid-stern section visible at upper left of photo) subsequently entered Drydock #4--the 1946 "Navy Day" program from the shipyard indicates that this had taken place by 27th October of that year.

The four CLs that were scrapped in Drydock #4 at the Philadelphia NSY were: Omaha (CL-4), Cincinnati (CL-6), Raleigh (CL-7) and Marblehead (CL-12).
I have two documents from the 4th Naval District, and of course they give different completion dates for the scrapping of these ships. The first document (dated 1 Apr 46) indicates that scrapping was completed on 27 February of that year; the second document (also dated 1 April 46) gives the completion date as 10 March 1946.
(My notes also indicate that scrapping was completed at the yard on nine ex-destroyer types as of 29 March 46: Litchfield (DD-336), Pruitt (DD-347), Jouett (DD-396), Clark (DD-361), Balch (DD-363), Sampson(DD-394), Schley (DD-103), Stringham (DD-83) and Whipple (DD-217).

The remaining CLs; Detroit (CL-8), Trenton (CL-11), Richmond (CL-9), Concord (CL-10) and Memphis (CL-13) were all sold to the Patapsco Scrap Co. of Baltimore. The sales bid (B-76-47AV T) was opened on 6 December 46; the five ships were sold for $336,140 (or $67,228 each), and custody of the ships was transferred to Patapsco between 27 December 46 and 21 January 47.
Note also that the attached photo distinctly shows that both cruisers have all four funnels--I think it's an optical illusion that either of these had had any of them removed.

The "light colored objects" in front of the two cruisers might "possibly" be barbettes from the Illinois (BB-65). According to drawings in the 1945 "Gun Mount and Turret Catalog", these two items appear to be about the same diameter as the barbettes for the two BBs' Tennessee & California; 14"/50 triple gun turrets; inside diameter 31 feet, from the same source -- outside diameter would have been about 33 feet. The Illinois barbettes would have an inside diameter about 37 1/4 feet, outside diameter rather over 39 feet.
USN photo submitted by Joe Lewis, courtesy of U.S.Naval Institute. Majority text by Joe Lewis.
Chuck Haberlein contributed to the (BB-65) i.d. with text.
Philadelphia Naval Shipyard 216k The US armed forces ship storage yard at Philadelphia, PA, 29 August 1946.
The battleship South Dakota (BB-57) is in the foreground. The Tennessee (BB-43) is to the upper left and the California (BB-44) is to the lower right.
Note also the Los Angeles (CA-135) & Chicago (CA-136) in Drydock # 4.
Photographer: Sam Shere, courtesy of time.com. via / images.google.com & Life.
Photo i.d. courtesy of Ron Reeves, (HTC) USNR (ret.)
BB-43 Tennessee 105k The Philadelphia Naval Shipyard in 1947. On the upper right side near the channel entrance, the mothballed battleships Tennessee (BB-43) and California (BB-44) are in a drydock. USN photo courtesy of Joe MacDonald.
Philadelphia Naval Shipyard53k"Aerial view of the Philadelphia Navy Base Shipyard and reserve fleet basin, March, 1948. Battleships in dry-dock in lower right include the Tennessee (BB-43), California (BB-44), and South Dakota (BB-57). The Spanish-American Olympia (ex-C-6) (IX-40), still on display in Philadelphia, is docked at the extreme right." USN photo # NA 80-G-392457, courtesy of "Volunteer State Battlewagon- U.S.S. Tennessee (BB-43)" by Myron J. Smith, Jr., submitted by Mike Green.
Philadelphia Naval Shipyard247kThe Tennessee (BB-43) & California (BB-44) at the Philadelphia Navy Base Shipyard, 1949. USN photo courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com.
BB-44 California138kReserve Fleet Basin, Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Pennsylvania. Photographed on 19 May 1955 with numerous cruisers, escort carriers, and auxiliaries in reserve. The nearest ship is the never-completed Hawaii (CB-3), which lacks its previously-installed three 12" gun turrets.
The cruisers outboard of Hawaii are (in unknown order) Honolulu (CL-48), Columbia (CL-56), Denver (CL-58), Galveston (CL-93), and Portsmouth (CL-102).
To their left are Tranquility (AH-14), Sanctuary (AH-17), and Pocono (AGC-16).
Behind Hawaii (from left to right) are Montpelier (CL-57), Houston (CL-81), Huntington (CL-107), Savannah (CL-42), Cleveland (CL-55), and Wilkes-Barre (CL-103).
Beyond them (from left to right) are Wichita (CA-45), Oregon City (CA-122), Chester (CA-27), and New Orleans (CA-32).
The cruisers on the left side of the basin (from front to rear) are Minneapolis (CA-36), Tuscaloosa (CA-37), San Francisco (CA-38), Augusta (CA-31), Louisville (CA-28), and Portland (CA-33).
Among the other ships in reserve in the basin are Fomalhaut (AE-20), Webster (ARV-2), Albemarle (AV-5), Tangier (AV-8), Pocomoke (AV-9), Chandeleur (AV-10), Abatan (AW-4), Mission, San Carlos (AO-120), Prince William (CVE-31), Anzio (CVE-57), Block Island (CVE-106), Palau (CVE-122), and San Carlos (AVP-51).
Moored in the shipyard at the extreme left are Tennessee (BB-43), California (BB-44), and Cabot (CVL-28).
Official USN photo USNHC # 80-G-668655, now in the collections of the National Archives.
Philadelphia Naval Shipyard611k On Inactive Duty: The Tennessee (BB-43) & California (BB-44), right background, two of the eight U.S. battleships bombed by the Japanese in their surprise attack on Pearl Harbor 15 years ago, ride quietly at anchor in the "mothball fleet" at the Philadelphia Navy Base Shipyard, 6 December 1956. AP wirephoto courtesy of David Buell.
BB-43 Tennessee 43k Tennessee (BB-43) awaiting scrapring at Baltimore, Maryland in 1959. USN photo, courtesy of Robert Sumrall, via Myron J. Smith Jr, from his book "Volunteer State Battlewagon", from Pictorial Histories Publishing, Missoula, Montana.
BB-43 Tennessee 140k Photo from an 11 June 1959 sales brochure announcing the sale of the "Big Five" battleships, the Tennessee (BB-43) among them. Here she sits at the Philadelphia Naval Shipyard. USN photo by Mike Green and text courtesy of Model Warships
BB-43 Tennessee 76k Tennessee (BB-43) awaiting scrapring at Baltimore, Maryland in 1959. USN photo, courtesy of Robert Sumrall, via Myron J. Smith Jr, from his book "Volunteer State Battlewagon", from Pictorial Histories Publishing, Missoula, Montana.
BB-43 Tennessee 112k The Tennessee (BB-43)& California (BB-44) awaiting scrapping by Bethlehem Steel Co. 1959. USN photo courtesy of Joe MacDonald.
BB-43 Tennessee 130k Models of the Tennessee (BB-43) at the Military Museum in Nashville - which is apart of the University of Tennessee. The models shows the Tennessee in both pre-war and post reconstruction modes. There are a couple of close ups showing details of the bridge area of the superstructure. Photo courtesy of Larry lee via Gary Priolo.
BB-43 Tennessee 199k Bow on view of the Tennessee (BB-43) in both pre-war and post reconstruction modes. Photo courtesy of Larry lee via Gary Priolo.
BB-43 Tennessee 159k Superstructure close up of the Tennessee (BB-43) in pre-war mode. Photo courtesy of Larry lee via Gary Priolo.
BB-43 Tennessee 175k Superstructure close up of the Tennessee (BB-43) in post reconstruction mode. Photo courtesy of Larry lee via Gary Priolo.
BB-43 Tennessee 126k Tennessee's (BB-43) bell on display at the Military Museum in Nashville. Photo courtesy of Larry lee via Gary Priolo.
BB-43 Tennessee 575k PO2 Ric Walker stands by the memorial wreath for the Tennessee (BB-43) during Survivor's Day ceremonies at the Arizona Memorial Visitors Center, 5 December 1991. The event honors the sailors and Marines of the battleships that were sunk or damaged in the 7 December 1941 attack on Pearl Harbor. USN photo # DN-SC-92-05801, by PHC Chet King, courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil, Defense Visual Information Center.
(NISMF)371kA guest studies a painting depicting the history of battleships. The artwork was painted by George Skybeck and presented to the Pearl Harbor Survivors Association during their annual banquet at Honolulu, Hawaii, on 8 December 1991. USN photo # DN-SC-92-05391, by PHC Carolyn Harris, courtesy of dodmedia.osd.mil, Defense Visual Information Center.
World War II Memorial371k A quote made by Fleet Adm. Chester W. Nimitz is inscribed on a granite wall at the National World War II Memorial located on the National Mall in Washington, D.C. Fleet Adm. Nimitz was the United States signatory to the surrender terms aboard the battleship Missouri (BB-63) in Tokyo Bay, Japan on 2 September 1945, thus ending World War II. Established by the American Battle Monuments Commission, the memorial honors all military veterans of World War II, the citizens on the home front, the nation at large, and the high moral purpose and idealism that motivated the nation's call to arms. On 29 May 2004, the memorial was formally dedicated with an estimated 200,000 people expected to attend, and includes 100,000 visiting veterans of all wars. USN photo # N-0295M-011 by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Daniel J. McLain, courtesy of news.navy.mil.

USS TENNESSEE BB-43 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry
(Located On The Hazegray & Underway Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)

Crew Contact And Reunion Information

Contact Name: Bud Galow
Address: 521 Inman Terrace, Willow Grove, PA 19090-3613
Phone: (215) 784-9885
E-mail:budgalow@comcast.net
Mail to USS Tennessee Reunion Association can be sent to: P.O. Box 1174, Willow Grove, PA 19090-0704

Note About Contacts.

The contact listed, Was the contact at the time for this ship when located. If another person now is the contact, E-mail me and I will update this entry. These contacts are compiled from various sources over a long period of time and may or may not be correct. Every effort has been made to list the newest contact if more than one contact was found.


Additional Resources
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