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NavSource Online: "Old Navy" Ship Photo Archive

CSS Nashville I


Awards, Citations and Campaign Ribbons

Civil War Medal

Nashville Class Brig-rigged Sidewheel Steamer:
  • Built as a brig-rigged, passenger steamer, in 1853 at Greenpoint N.Y.
  • Seized in 1861 at Charleston S.C. by Confederates after the fall of Fort Sumter
  • Fitted out as the lightly-armored cruiser CSS Nashville, LT. R. B. Pegram, CSN, in command
  • Passing the blockade, 21 October 1861, Nashville crossed the Atlantic to Southampton, England, the first ship of war to fly the Confederate flag in English waters
  • Nashville captured and burned the sailing merchantman Harvey Birch in the English Channel, 19 November 1861
  • Returning to American waters early in 1862, she captured and burned the schooner Robert Gilfillan, 26 February 1862
  • Nashville returned to Beaufort, N.C., 28 February 1862, having captured two prizes worth $66,000 during the cruise
  • Sold for use as a blockade runner and renamed SS Thomas L. Wragg
  • Commissioned as the privateer, Rattlesnake, 5 November 1862
  • Final Disposition, destroyed by the monitor USS Montauk, in the Ogeechee River, GA., 28 February 1863
    Specifications:
    Displacement 1,221 t.
    Length 215' 6"
    Beam 34' 6"
    Depth of Hold 21' 9"
    Draft unknown
    Speed unknown
    Complement 40
    Armament
    two 12-pdr guns
    Propulsion steam and sail

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    Size Image Description Contributed
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    CSS Nashville
    Alabama 186k "Merchant Steamers Converted into Gun-boats."
    Engraving published in "Harper's Weekly", July-December 1861 volume. Depicts thirteen merchant steamships acquired by the U.S. Navy between April and August 1861 and subsequently converted into warships, plus the steamer Nashville (far left), which became a Confederate cruiser. US Navy ships as identified below the image bottom, are (from left to right:
    USS Alabama,
    USS Quaker City,
    USS Santiago de Cuba, (listed as "St. Jago de Cuba")
    USS Mount Vernon,
    USS Massachusetts,
    USS South Carolina,
    USS Florida,
    USS De Soto,
    USS Augusta,
    USS James Adger,
    USS Monticello,
    USS Bienville and
    USS R.R. Cuyler.
    US Naval History and Heritage Command photo # NH 59366.
    Robert Hurst
    CSS Nashville 229k "The 'Nashville' and 'Tuscarora' at Southampton"
    Line engraving published in "Harper's Weekly", January-June 1862, page 96, depicting CSS Nashville in dock at Southampton, England, circa January 1862, with USS Tuscarora keeping watch in the right distance. Other identified ships in the distance are probably HMS Dauntless and HMS Moulton, British warships present to protect English neutrality.
    US Naval History and Heritage Command photo # NH 59348
    Bill Gonyo
    CSS Nashville 69k CSS Nashville burning the 1,700 ton sailing merchantman Harvey Birch out of Mystic, CT. in the English Channel, 19 November 1861.
    Oil painting signed by D. McFarlane, 1864. Courtesy Peabody Essex Museum, England.
    Bill Gonyo
    CSS Nashville 219k Line engraving published in "The Soldier in Our Civil War", volume I, page 215, depicting USS Nashville capturing and burning the U.S. merchantman Harvey Birch in the English Channel, 19 November 1861.
    US Naval History and Heritage Command photo # NH 59350
    Bill Gonyo
    CSS Nashville 103k Wash drawing by R.G. Skerrett, 1901, depicting CSS Nashville steaming away after burning a captured schooner. Probably the schooner Robert Gilfillanon 26 February 1862.
    US Naval History and Heritage Command photo # NH 57824, courtesy of the Navy Art Collection, Washington, DC.
    Bill Gonyo
    CSS Nashville 199k "The Rebel Steamer 'Nashville' Running the Blockade at Beaufort, North Carolina."
    Line engraving published in "Harper's Weekly", January-June 1862, page 209, depicting CSS Nashvillerunning into Beaufort, 28 February 1862, after her raiding cruise in the Atlantic and European waters.
    US Naval History and Heritage Command photo # NH 59291
    Bill Gonyo
    Confederate Privateer Rattlesnake
    CSS Nashville 91k Blueprint of Rattlesnakes, rigging details and plan. Tommy Trampp
    CSS Nashville 94k Line engraving published in "Harper's Weekly", 1863, showing the Confederate Privateer Rattlesnake (ex-CSS Nashville lying by the railway bridge on the Ogeechee River, Georgia, in about February 1863.
    US Naval History and Heritage Command photo # NH 58765
    Bill Gonyo
    CSS Nashville 162k Line engraving published in "Harper's Weekly", January-June 1863, page 193, showing the monitor USS Montauk shelling the Confederate Privateer Rattlesnake (ex-CSS Nashville) in the Ogeechee River, Georgia, 28 February 1863. Fort McAllister is in the right-center distance.
    US Naval History and Heritage Command photo # NH 59285
    US Naval History and Heritage Command
    CSS Nashville 170k Line engraving published in "The Soldier in Our Civil War", Volume II, page 41, showing Rattlesnake burning after being shelled by the monitor USS Montauk commanded by CAPT. John L. Worden, USN, in the Ogeechee River, Georgia, 28 February 1863. Fort McAllister is in the right-center background, and the U.S. Navy gunboats USS Wissahickon, USS Seneca and USS Dawn are providing supporting fire in the left distance.
    US Naval History and Heritage Command photo # NH 59286
    US Naval History and Heritage Command
    CSS Nashville 372k Rattlesnake sketch for publication for Harpers Weekly. Measures 9x5.5 the sketch titled >The Pirate Steamer Nashville lying at the R.R. Bridge on the Ogeechee River". A sketch from a deserter from Savannah via Ogeechee River. Tommy Trampp
    CSS Nashville 315k Rattlesnake sketch for publication for Harpers Weekly. Measures 7x5 sketch captioned "Explosion of the Magazine of the Nashville". Tommy Trampp
    CSS Nashville 219k Line engraving published in "The Soldier in Our Civil War", Volume II, page 39, showing Confederate Privateer Rattlesnake's remains in the Ogeechee River, near Fort McAllister, GA. She had been destroyed by gunfire from USS Montauk, 28 February 1863.
    US Naval History and Heritage Command Photo # NH 58766
    Robert Hurst

    CSS Nashville II
    Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships (DANFS)

    Commanding Officers
    01LT. Pegram, Robert Baker CSN27 September 1861 - 28 February 1862CSS Nashville
    02CAPT. Gooding, Matthew Wragg, CSN17 March 1862 - 5 November 1862SS Thomas L. Wragg
    03LT. Baker, Thomas Harrison, CSN5 November 1862 - 28 February 1863 (Sunk)SS Rattlesnake
    Courtesy Bill Gonyo

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    Last Updated 3 November 2017