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NavSource Online: Mine Warfare Vessel Photo Archive

Condor (MSC[O] 5)
ex-AMS-5
ex-YMS-192



Call sign:
November - Zulu - Foxtrot - Sierra


Condor served the Navies of the United States and Japan.

YMS-1 Class Auxiliary Motor Minesweeper:

  • The second Condor was laid down 30 September 1942 as YMS-192 by the Greenport Basin and Construction Co., Greenport, Long Island, NY
  • Launched 5 December 1942
  • Completed and commissioned USS YMS-192, 13 June 1943
  • YMS-192 served along the U.S. East Coast and in the Caribbean until the Atlantic War ended in May 1945
  • Sent to the Pacific, she took part in post-war mine clearance operations off Japan
  • YMS-192 returned to the U.S. in April 1946
    Naval Vessel Register of 1 January 1949 lists plan for decommissioning and placing in reserve as February 1947
  • Decommissioned in May 1946
  • While laid up in reserve at San Diego, CA she was reclassified as a Motor Minesweeper, AMS-5 and named Condor 18 February 1947
  • Recommissioned for Korean War service in November 1950, Condor deployed to the combat zone in March 1951
  • She provided minesweeping and patrol services off Korea and Japan to the end of the conflict in July 1953 and continued her activities in that area during the following years
  • Reclassified as a Coastal Minesweeper (Old), MSC(O)-5, 7 February 1955
  • Condor was loaned to Japan in March 1955 and renamed Ujishima (MCS 655)
  • Returned to the U.S. Navy in 1967
  • Struck from the Naval Register 31 March 1967
  • Sunk as a target in August 1968.

    Specifications:

  • Displacement 270 t.
  • Length 136'
  • Beam 24' 6"
  • Draft 8'
  • Speed 15 kts.
  • Complement 32
  • Armament: One 3"/50 dual purpose gun mount, two 20mm mounts, and two depth charge projectors
  • Propulsion: Two 880bhp General Motors 8-268A diesel engines, Snow and Knobstedt single reduction gear, two shafts.
    Click on thumbnail
    for full size image
    Size Image Description Source
    YMS-192
    Condor 113k c. 1945-46, San Francisco Bay
    YMS-192 returning to the U.S. at the end of World War II.
    U.S. Navy photo NH 79690
    Naval Historical Center
    Condor (AMS 5)
    Defense 73k 8 October 1952
    Laertes (AR-20) at Sasebo, Japan, with nine minesweepers and a harbor tug alongside. Ships nested to left of Laertes are (from left): Impeccable (AM-320); Gladiator (AM-319); Shoveler (AM-382); Defense (AM-317) and Devastator (AM-318). Those nested to the right are (from left): Condor; Kite (AMS-22); Curlew (AMS-8); Chatterer (AMS-40) and Wallacut (YTB-420).
    National Archives photo 80-G-63229
    Naval Historical Center
    AMS-5 Condor/LST-735 Dukes County 88k Dukes County LST-735 serving as mother ship for seven minesweepers, probably in a Japanese port, circa 1952-54. Ships nested alongside are: Gull (AMS-16); Firecrest (AMS-10); Condor; Merganser (AMS-26); Osprey (AMS-28); Competent (AM-316); and Chief (AM-315).
    U.S. Navy photo NH 68589

    Commanding Officers
    01LTJG Willard Cannell Broden, USNR1945 - 1946
    02LTJG Edward Charles Morin, USNNovember 1950 - March 1952
    03LT Richard William Geaney, USNMarch 1952 - July 1952
    04LT William Dennis Randell, USNJuly 1952
    05LT Donald Bagnall "Red" Meek, USN - USNA Class of 19501954 - 1955
    Courtesy Wolfgang Hechler, Ron Reeves and Joe Radigan

    View the Condor (MSC[O] 5)
    DANFS History entry located on the Haze Gray & Underway Website
    Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
    Naval Minewarfare Association
    Association of Minemen

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    This page created by Gary P. Priolo and maintained by Joe Radigan
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