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NavSource Online: Aircraft Carrier Photo Archive


Contributed by Mike Smolinski

USS ORISKANY   (CV-34)
(later CVA-34 and CV-34)



Flag Hoist/Radio Call Sign: November - Tango - Bravo - India
Tactical Voice Radio Call: "CHILD PLAY"


Specifications
Displacement 30,800 Tons, Dimensions, 904' (oa) x 129' x 30' 6" (Max)
Armament 8 x 5"/38AA, 32 x 40mm, 46 x 20mm, 82 Aircraft.
Armor, 4" Belt, 2 1/2" Hanger deck, 1 1/2" Deck, 1 1/2" Conning Tower.
Machinery, 150,000 SHP; Westinghouse Geared Turbines, 4 screws
Speed, 33 Knots, Crew 3460.

Essex Class (*) Aircraft Carrier
Ordered (**) Laid down Launched Commissioned Decommissioned Stricken
7 Aug 1942 1 May 1944 13 Oct 1945 25 Sep 1950
7 Mar 1959
2 Jan 1957
30 Sep 1976

25 Jul 1989
Builder: New York Naval Shipyard, Brooklyn, N.Y.
(*) "Long Hull" group, aka Ticonderoga Class
(**) see below
Click On Image
For Full Size Image
Size Image Description Contributed
By And/Or Copyright
Namesake
CV-34 Oriskany
NS023455
86k

The Battle of Oriskany was one of the bloodiest battles in the American Revolutionary War and a significant engagement of the Saratoga campaign. It also has the distinction of being one of the few battles of the war where almost all of the participants were North American: Loyalists and Native Americans fought against Patriots (the name the colonists who rebelled against British control called themselves) and Oneidas (Native American people, one of the five founding nations of the Iroquois Confederacy.)

On August 6, 1777 some 700–800 Tryon County militiamen and Oneida warriors under Brigadier General Nicholas Herkimer and Chief Skenandoah were ambushed by an equal force of Tories and Mohawks under Sir John Johnson, Col. John Butler and Joseph Brant. In the 6-hour battle the American force was prevented from relieving Fort Stanwix; but, in turn, prevented the British force from reaching General John Burgoyne, thus contributing to that gentleman's losses at Bemis Heights and his defeat at Saratoga. Losses at Oriskany were severe on both sides. American losses amounted to half the original force, including General Herkimer who, severely wounded, died a week later.

"Herkimer at the Battle of Oriskany," by F. C. Yohn. This painting hung in the Officer's Mess of USS Oriskany while the ship was in commission. It is now in the Utica Public Library.

Partial text and image courtesy of Wikipedia.
Partial text courtesy of DANFS.
The Early Years — Korea
CV-34 Oriskany
NS023401
35k Undated, early 1950's image (pre SCB-125A). USN
CV-34 Oriskany
NS023453
68k

USS Oriskany at anchor, date and place unknown.

David Buell
CV-34 Oriskany
NS023419
100k

USS Oriskany (CV-34) off New York City, 6 December 1950, while en route to conduct carrier qualifications off Jacksonville, Florida.

Oriskany is fitted with SPS-6 and SX radar, plus a YE homing beacon on the masthead. Forward, on the port side, are some 20-mm/70-cal Oerlikon AA guns. Also of note is the helicopter parked on the forward end of the flight deck. (Thanks to Robert Hurst, who provided additional info).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center (# NH 97408).

NHC
CV-34 Oriskany
NS023420
28k Another view, as above (photo # USN 427341).

NHC
CV-34 Oriskany
NS023457
113k

Aerial view of USS Oriskany (CV-34) underway, probably during her shakedown cruise, in early 1951.

(Digitally restored by Tom Kermen.)

Glenn D. Winningham,
for his father Victor W. Winningham, Jr.
(USS Oriskany,
1945–47 & 1949–52)
CV-34 Oriskany
NS023458
304k

Aerial view of USS Oriskany (CV-34) underway, probably during her maiden deployment (and only Med cruise), 15 May – 4 October 1951.

(Digitally restored by Tom Kermen.)

Glenn D. Winningham,
for his father Victor W. Winningham, Jr.
(USS Oriskany,
1945–47 & 1949–52)
CV-34 Oriskany
NS023414
100k

USS Oriskany (CV-34) with a North American AJ-1 "Savage" attack plane on her flight deck. Photographed by W.M. Cox. The image is dated 29 August 1952, when Oriskany was operating off the U.S. west coast, preparing for her first Korean War deployment.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (photo # 80-G-K-13048).

Scott Dyben
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023421
62k

Oriskany moored at Yokosuka, Japan, circa 1952-53, with a Commencement Bay-class CVE alongside and US-built Tacoma-class frigates in the background. Note the dusting of snow on the flight deck, loaded with Skyraiders and Panthers of CVG-102/CVG-12. The emergency conn is barely discernible under the overhang of the flight deck, just abaft the Mk-63 director controlling her two foremost twin 3"/50s. US Navy photo # USN-1171842.

NHC
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023468
346k

Wave breaks over the carrier's flight deck, as USS Oriskany (CVA-34) operates in heavy winter weather off the Korean coast. Photograph is dated 10 January 1953. Note Vought F4U-5N fighters parked on the icy flight deck.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives (# 80-G-477565).

Courtesy of Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023446
141k

USS Oriskany (CVA-34) off Point Loma, at the entrance to San Diego Bay, California, in the mid-1950s (note her foremost twin 3"/50 gun mounts had been removed.)

David Buell
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023422
99k

USS Oriskany (CVA-34) underway off the coast of Southern California, 27 January 1955, with four F2H Banshee jet fighters on her flight deck.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center (# NH 97409).

NHC
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023423
92k

One of a series of photographs "taken by a Navy F2H-2P Banshee as it followed another Banshee in for a carrier landing on the USS Oriskany (CVA-34), somewhere off the coast of San Francisco, California. The photo plane was equipped with a forward firing aerial mapping and reconnaissance camera installed in its nose. The camera was a type K-48 aerial camera with a 24-inch lens, a red A-25 filter, 1/200 second exposure, an exposure interval of two (2) seconds, and film size of 9x18 inches. The speed of the aircraft during approach is approximately 110 knots." (quoted from the original caption released with this image). Photograph was taken on 8 February 1955.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center (# NH 97412).

NHC
SCB-125A Modernization — Vietnam
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023456
185k

Oriskany received SCB-125A modernization in 1957–1959. Article and photo are from the July 1957 Buships Journal.

Larry Blumenthal, PH3, 1957-61.
"US Navy Photos"
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023456a
93k
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023424
90k

USS Oriskany (CVA-34) off the San Francisco Naval Shipyard, California, on 27 April 1959, following installation of her new angled flight deck and hurricane bow.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center (# NH 97410).

NHC
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023433
158k

"Aircraft Carrier Oriskany, modernization along program SCB-27A."   (From a Russian publication).

This drawing actually shows Oriskany after SCB-125A modernization.

Alex Tatchin
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023403
114k Undated, post SCB-125A. At speed. USN
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023470
107k

United States Navy photo of USS Oriskany (CVA-34) in port at NAS Ford Island, taken at night. It's a great view of the Mighty O. This was prior to the ship sailing on a Far East tour in the early 1960s.

Tommy Trampp
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS0587719
122k USS Perkins (DDR-877), USS Pollux (AKS-4) and USS Oriskany (CVA-34) during a replenishment at sea off Okinawa in 1960. Doug Smith, RD3, USS Perkins (DDR-877), 1959-1962
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023469
100k

USS Oriskany (CVA-34), Far East Cruise, 14 May–15 December 1960. Ceremony on deck with Scouts in front of the ship's island. Photo from the Cruise Book.

Tommy Trampp
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023469a
108k

USS Oriskany (CVA-34), Far East Cruise, 14 May–15 December 1960. Sailors unloading a plane's cargo. Photo from the Cruise Book.

CVA-34 Oriskany
NS091910615
127k

USS Navasota (AO-106) refueling USS Oriskany (CVA-34) and USS King (DLG-10) in the South China Sea, circa early-1965.

Patrick J. Audinet Sr., STG-2,
USS King (DLG-10) July '62 to July '65
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023460
85k

A Chance Vought F-8E Crusader (BuNo 150912) from Marine All-Weather Fighter squadron (VMF(AW)) 212 "Lancers" in 1965. The aircraft is armed with AIM-9D Sidewinder missiles. VMF(AW)-212 was assigned to Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 16 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Oriskany (CVA-34) for a deployment to Vietnam from 5 April to 16 December 1965. VMF(AW)-212 kept its tail code "WD," although CVW-16's tail code was "AH." Photo taken by Marine Jimmy Labianco.

VMF(AW)-212 lost four Crusaders during the 1965 deployment: two shot down by enemy AAA, and two in operational accidents when landing on Oriskany after combat missions. BuNo 150912, assigned to VMF(AW)-235, crashed about 10 miles NW of Da Nang, South Vietnam, as it was returning from a bombing sortie and preparing to land, on the night of 2–3 October 1967.

Robert Hurst
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023472
105k

A Douglas A-1H Skyraider (BuNo 137512) of Attack Squadron (VA) 152 "Friendlies" in flight in 1966. VA-152 was assigned to Attack Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 16 aboard the aircraft carrier USS Oriskany (CVA-34) for a deployment to Vietnam from 26 May to 16 November 1966. BuNo 137512 was later lost over Laos to ground fire (location 191700N 1030600E) on 4 July 1969 while in service with the USAF 56th Special Operations Wing. The pilot, Col. Patrick M. Fallon, Vice Commander, 56th SOW, ejected safely, but was later missing in action, presumed dead. U.S. Navy photo. U.S. Navy National Museum of Naval Aviation photo No. 1996.253.2810.

Robert Hurst
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023404
49k Bashi Channel, June 23, 1966. ©Richard Leonhardt
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023405
65k Bashi Channel, June 1966. ©Richard Leonhardt
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023406
95k Bashi Channel, June 1966. ©Richard Leonhardt
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023408
111k Bashi Channel, June 1966. ©Richard Leonhardt
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023409
125k Pacific, June 1966. Taken from Fred T. Berry (DD-858) fueling alongside. ©Richard Leonhardt
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023410
72k Pacific, June 1966. Richard E. Krause (DD-849) making approach to come alongside to fuel. Taken from Fred T. Berry (DD-858) ©Richard Leonhardt
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023411
120k Bashi Channel, June 1966. ©Richard Leonhardt
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023407
35k Dixie Station, South China Sea, June 30, 1966. ©Richard Leonhardt
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023425
98k

M-117, 500-pound and 1000-pound bombs line the carrier's flight deck during Vietnam War combat operations in the South China Sea, 21 August 1966. Photographed by PHAA C.B. Vesper. Planes parked nearby include A-4, F-8 and A-1 types.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph (# USN 1118303).

NHC
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023426
71k

USS Oriskany (CVA-34) catapulting an A-4 Skyhawk during operations off Vietnam, 30 August 1966.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph (# USN 1117395).

NHC
Fire aboard Oriskany, October 26, 1966
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023427
81k

Smoke pours from Oriskany's Hangar Bay #1, during the fire which killed 44 of her officers and men, 26 October 1966.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph (# USN 1121718).

NHC
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023428
131k

"Right Hand Salute! — As the body of Lieutenant Commander Omar R. Ford, USN, one of 44 officers and men who lost their lives in USS Oriskany October 26 fire tragedy, is committed to the deep from Oriskany's flight deck during memorial services at sea in the Western Pacific, November 6, en route to San Diego, California. Fire-scarred Oriskany departed Subic Bay, Philippine Islands, for San Diego November 3." (quoted from the original caption released with this image). Note Oriskany's insignia on the light-colored flag, at right, and three destroyers steaming alongside. Nearest destroyer is USS Chevalier (DD-805). Next outboard is USS Gurke (DD-783). Photographed by JOC Dick Wood.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center (# NH 97411).

Note: the Oriskany fire actually occurred in 1966, not 1967 as is incorrectly printed on the photo.

NHC
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS09033618
66k

"The Oriskany Fire"

"It's a rare sight to see a Destroyer Tender alongside an Aircraft Carrier. As a matter of fact, no one here knows whether it has ever happened before."

"Recently, however, at Subic Bay, in the Philippines, USS Bryce Canyon (AD-36) wrote a new page in Western Pacific history by going alongside USS Oriskany (CVA-34). The event was occasioned by a serious fire which had broken out in Oriskany while operating off the Vietnam coast. As soon as the ships were moored together, Bryce Canyon's repair personnel swarmed aboard the carrier, and commenced around-the-clock operations. First on the agenda was the immediate recharging of some 107 CO2 fire extinguishers, which had been used in fighting the blaze. At the end of six days, all repair work was completed. Every one of the seventy ventilation and heating systems, as well as all electric motors in the damaged area had been checked out and restored to order. During this period, working parties from the tender had also pitched in with Oriskany sailors and personnel from SRF Subic, in cleaning up the fire and smoke damaged areas to make them habitable. Elsewhere aboard the tender, skilled technicians worked on countless jobs not immediately associated with the fire damage, giving the carrier a tender availability the like of which she had never seen. On conclusion of work, Bryce Canyon's modern electronic accounting machine installation tallied the results of her 6-day effort. In all, a total of 6,019 manhours had been expended; the equivalent of a two week availability for four destroyers."

"As both ships got underway at the crack of dawn on the sixth day, Oriskany sent the following visual message to the tender: "Your outstanding service and voluntary assistance in removing our scars is greatly appreciated. The willingness to work and your speed and efficiency helped us leave Subic Bay in outstanding shape for our transit home. Well done to all men aboard Bryce Canyon!"

(Quoted from USS Bryce Canyon's Cruise Book.)

Bruce A. Campbell,
USS Bryce Canyon
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS09033619
58k
 
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023412
114k Collage of typical activities that go on routinely day in and day out during operations off the coast of Vietnam aboard a CV. Gary Priolo
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023415
101k

En route to the Western Pacific for operations off Vietnam, 23 June 1967. Photographed by PH1 F.L. Blair.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph (photo # KN-15081).

Scott Dyben
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023447
85k

USS Oriskany (CVA-34) in the South China Sea during her June 16, 1967 – January 31, 1968 Vietnam cruise. Photo taken from USS Bausell (DD-845).

Photo by Lee Noland STGC Ret.
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023402
233k

Good overhead view of USS Oriskany (CVA-34) underway with Carrier Air Wing 16 (CVW-16) during her June 16, 1967 – January 31, 1968 Vietnam cruise. Photo by PH1 F. L. Blair.

USN
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023448
193k

Official US Navy Photograph #CVA-4147-9-67 of USS Oriskany (CVA-34), from the Mighty O's own Photo Lab, dated 18 September 1967 (original caption states Oriskany is shown operating in the Gulf of Tonkin, but she was en route to Sasebo on that date — the pic might have been actually taken a few days earlier.) Oriskany and Carrier Air Wing 16 (CVW-16, tail code "AH") were on her third combat cruise to Vietnam (June 16, 1967 – January 31, 1968) and spent 122 days on the line.

Photo by PHC Neal Crowe.

Robert M. Cieri
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023416
95k

Navy pilot Lieutenant (Junior Grade) Denny Earl, with both legs shattered by North Vietnamese anti-aircraft fire, successfully lands his A-4E Skyhawk attack plane aboard the Oriskany in the Gulf of Tonkin, 21 November 1967. The nylon emergency barrier assures the wounded pilot that he will not have to make more than one attempt to land his plane. Photographed by PHC Neal Crowe.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph (photo # K-42269).

Scott Dyben
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023429
44k

USS Oriskany (CVA-34) underway on 3 January 1968. US Navy photo by PHC Neal Crowe [K-43387].

USN
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023430
48k

Taken by RD3 Steve Karolyi from the deck of the USS Mahan (DLG-11) around 1968 in the Gulf of Tonkin.

Richard Hallowell
RD1 DLG-11  69-71
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023431
45k

Taken by RD3 Steve Karolyi from the deck of the USS Mahan (DLG-11) around 1968 in the Gulf of Tonkin.

Richard Hallowell
RD1 DLG-11  69-71
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023432
133k

Seventh Fleet ships replenishing in the South China Sea, May 1969. Photographed by PH1 Long. Ships present are (from front to back): USS Wiltsie (DD-716), USS Tappahannock (AO-43), USS Oriskany (CVA-34), USS Mars (AFS-1), and USS Perkins (DD-877).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph (# USN 1139357).

NHC
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023454
166k

Aerial 3/4 starboard bow view of USS Oriskany (CVA-34) conducting air operations in the South China Sea, May 6, 1969. Official US Navy Photograph from the ship's photo lab (# CVA-34-3398-5-6-1969), taken from an HC-1 Seasprite by PH1 R. A. Long.

The carrier was on her 12th overseas deployment, and 4th Vietnam Cruise, April 16–November 17, 1969. On board was Carrier Air Wing NINETEEN, tailcode "NM", consisting of the following squadrons: VF-191 "Satan's Kittens" and VF-194 "Red Lightnings" (F-8J Crusaders); VA-23 "Black Knights" and VA-192 "Golden Dragons" (A-4F Skyhawks); VA-195 "Dambusters" (A-4E Skyhawks); VFP-63 Det. 34 "Eyes of the Fleet" (RF-8G Crusaders); VAQ-130 Det. 34 "Zappers" (EKA-3B Skywarriors); VAW-111 Det. 34 "Hunters" (E-1B Tracers); and HC-1 Det. 6 "Fleet Angels" (UH-2C Seasprites).

Robert M. Cieri
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023449
165k

USS Oriskany (CVA-34), with Point Loma and San Diego Bay in the background. This photo, from Marine Photos and Publishing of Spring Valley, CA, appears to have been taken sometime after Mighty O's 1968 overhaul.

David Buell

NS023443
112k USS Oriskany (CVA-34) makes a port approach to USS Niagara Falls (AFS-3) at Yankee Station, summer-fall 1969. © William P. Jones, former medical officer, USS Niagara Falls

NS023466
121k USS Oriskany (CVA-34) underway in the first half of the 1970s, with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 19 aboard. Wolfgang Hechler

NS023463
190k

These pictures were taken off the coast of Vietnam, November 1971. They were taken from the island, on "vulture's row," during flight recovery operations ("traps"). The pictures are of A-7 Corsair IIs. This time, they aborted ("boltered") their landing and had to go around for another attempt.

The first four pictures appear to be of an A-7A from VA-153 "Blue Tail Flies." The last picture appears to be of an A-7B from VA-155 "Silver Foxes."

Bob Canchola, BT, USS Oriskany 1971–1973

NS023463a
186k

NS023463b
190k

NS023463c
189k

NS023463d
177k

NS023464
176k

Combat aircraft of Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 19 crowd the forward end of the flight deck of USS Oriskany (CVA-34), off Vietnam, November 1971: F-8J Crusaders from VF-191 "Satan's Kittens" and VF-194 "Red Lightnings," A-7A and A-7B Corsair IIs from VA-153 "Blue Tail Flies," VA-215 "Barn Owls" and VA-155 "Silver Foxes."

Bob Canchola, BT, USS Oriskany 1971–1973

NS023464a
182k

This F-8J Crusader, BuNo 149155, was assigned to VF-191 "Satan's Kittens." BuNo 149155 was manufactured as an F8U-2NE, redesignated F-8E under the 1962 system, and later upgraded to F-8J standard.

Note, on the upper right corner, the tail of an A-7B Corsair II assigned to VA-215 "Barn Owls."

USS Oriskany (CVA-34), off Vietnam, November 1971.


NS023464b
172k

An A-7B Corsair II assigned to VA-215 "Barn Owls" (side number 412) and an F-8J Crusader assigned to VF-191 "Satan's Kittens" (side number 110) ride the deck of USS Oriskany (CVA-34) off Vietnam, November 1971.


NS023462
156k

Two photos of USS Oriskany (CVA-34) moored at Leyte Pier, Cubi Point Naval Air Station, Subic Bay, Philippines, 30 November–2 December 1971, at the end of her 6th Vietnam cruise.

Bob Canchola, BT, USS Oriskany 1971–1973

NS023462a
79k

NS023465
176k

En route to CONUS from Vietnam, December 1971.

Neat views of the large rectangular antenna of the SPS-43A air-search radar and the large "dish" of the SPS-30 height finder. The framework protruding from the starboard side of the island carried antennas for a ULQ-6 defensive jammer against Soviet missiles.

Bob Canchola, BT, USS Oriskany 1971–1973

NS023465a
181k

NS023467e
105k

A Vietnam cease-fire was announced on 23 January 1973 and came into effect on the 27th. The carriers USS Oriskany (CVA-34), USS Ranger (CVA-61), USS Enterprise (CVAN-65), and USS America (CVA-66) were on Yankee Station and cancelled all combat sorties.

On Sunday, 28 January 1973, all four carriers, along with a DD/DE screen, steamed together for a photo exercise. As seen from Oriskany, with Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 19:

NS023467e, NS023467f, NS023467i, NS023467j: Ranger, with CVW-2.

NS023467a, NS023467d, NS023467g: Enterprise, with CVW-14.

NS023467, NS023467b, NS023467c, NS023467h: America, with CVW-8.

Bob Canchola, BT, USS Oriskany 1971–1973

NS023467f
114k

NS023467i
108k

NS023467j
101k

NS023467a
106k

NS023467d
116k

NS023467g
126k Bob Canchola, BT, USS Oriskany 1971–1973

NS023467
99k

NS023467b
111k

NS023467c
109k

NS023467h
111k

NS023461
106k

A Chance Vought F-8J Crusader of Fighter Squadron (VF) 194 "Red Lightnings" intercepts a Soviet Tupolev Tu-95 Bear-A/B reconnaissance aircraft near the aircraft carrier USS Oriskany (CVA-34) (steaming below), 25 May 1974. VF-194 was assigned to Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 19. Photo taken by LT Fessenden. (Available from DefenseImagery.mil, id. DN-SC-85-06071.)

Robert Hurst
CVA-43 Coral Sea
NS024346
146k

Aerial view of Naval Air Station Alameda, summer of 1974. Left to right: USS Coral Sea (CVA-43), USS Hancock (CVA-19), USS Oriskany (CVA-34), and USS Enterprise (CVAN-65).

Robert M. Cieri
CVA-43, CVA-19, CVA-34, CVAN-65
NS024346a
345k

Same as NS024346, above, from a different angle.

CVN-65, CV-43, CV-34
NS026523
157k

Left to right: USS Enterprise (CVN-65), USS Coral Sea (CV-43), USS Kansas City (AOR-3), USS Wabash (AOR-5), and USS Oriskany (CV-34) at NAS Alameda, CA, July-August 1975.

Official US Navy photo from the Naval Photographic Center, Washington, D.C.

Robert M. Cieri
Miscellany
CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023442
26k

Oriskany and the F9F-5 Panthers of VF-192 "Golden Dragons"  (thereafter nicknamed "World Famous Golden Dragons") were featured in the movies Men of the Fighting Lady (starring Van Johnson and Walter Pidgeon) and The Bridges at Toko-Ri (starring William Holden and Grace Kelly), filmed just a few months after the end of the Korean War.

-
Ex-USS Oriskany
ex-CV-34 Oriskany
NS023450
39k

Ex-Oriskany at Puget Sound Naval Shipyard, Bremerton, WA in 1994.

Stephen Renouard
ex-CV-34 Oriskany
NS023459
45k

Ex-Oriskany tied up at Mare Island in 1999.

From Warship Boneyards, by Kit and Carolyn Bonner.

Submitted by Robert Hurst.
ex-CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023434
415k

"Former Navy warship the USS Oriskany (CV-34) sits in the waters off Pensacola on Monday afternoon after its trip from Corpus Christi, Texas. The carrier will be tied up at the Port of Pensacola until it is sunk in the Gulf under the artificial reefs program."

Photo from the 21 December 2004 edition of the Pensacola News Journal newspaper.

Joe Radigan
ex-CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023435
82k

The 888-foot decommissioned aircraft carrier Oriskany arrived in Pensacola, Fla, on Dec. 20, 2004 from Corpus Christi, Texas. Oriskany will be the Navy’s first ship to be sunk under the authority provided under the fiscal year 2004 National Defense Authorization Act (Public Law 108-136) and will be the largest ship sunk as an artificial reef. The Oriskany artificial reef will benefit marine life, commercial and sport fishing and recreational diving off the coast of Florida. The sink date has not been established. U.S. Navy photo by Gary Nichols (050111-N 5328N-010).

Chester Morris
ex-CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023435a
147k

Onlookers watch as the 888-foot decommissioned aircraft carrier Oriskany arrives in Pensacola on 20 December 2004 from Corpus Christi, Texas. U.S. Navy photo by LT Gary Nichols (# 050111-N-5328N-015).

Bill Gonyo
ex-CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023436
89k

Pictures of the ex-Oriskany at the port of Pensacola, January 2005, being prepared for her ultimate fate as an artificial reef. Note a large rectangular hole cut in the hull (to allow for quicker and more even flooding?) below the forward port gun sponson and not far above where the waterline used to be.

W. Eric Zink
ex-CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023437
88k
ex-CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023438
66k
ex-CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023439
76k
ex-CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023440
56k
ex-CVA-34 Oriskany
NS023441
55k

Pensacola, June 2005.

Photo by Keely Shea Finnegan (11 years old)
ex-CV-34 Oriskany
NS023444
87k

Pensacola, Fla., March 22, 2006 — Tugboats turn the decommissioned aircraft carrier ex-USS Oriskany (CV-34) prior to mooring at Allegheny Pier onboard Naval Air Station Pensacola. Known as the "Big O," the 32,000-ton, 888-foot Oriskany was being delivered to the air station while she was being prepared for her final journey. The ship was scheduled to be sunk 22 miles south of Pensacola in approximately 212 feet of water in the Gulf of Mexico May 17, 2006, where she would become the largest ship ever intentionally sunk as an artificial reef. After the Oriskany reached the bottom, ownership of the vessel would transfer from the Navy to the State of Florida. U.S. Navy photo by Megan Kohr (# 060322-7750K-N-319).

Tony Cowart
ex-CV-34 Oriskany
NS023471
183k

A pier-side press conference was held on board Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola, 18 April 2006, for the decommissioned aircraft carrier USS Oriskany (CVA-34), as the ship made final preparations for sinking. Oriskany was scheduled to be scuttled 22 miles south of Pensacola in approximately 212 feet of water in the Gulf of Mexico, 17 May 2006, where she would become the largest ship ever intentionally sunk as an artificial reef. After Oriskany reached the bottom, ownership of the vessel transferred from the Navy to the State of Florida. U.S. Navy photo by Mr. Gary Nichols (# 060418-5328N-N-159).

Chester Morris
Scott Koen & ussnewyork.com
ex-CV-34 Oriskany
NS023473
89k

The US Coast Guard Marine Protector Class Patrol Craft USCGC Bonito (WPB-87431) enforces a safety zone in the water off the coast of Pensacola, Florida, 15 May 2006. The Bonito crew ensured that recreational and commercial vessels stayed at least 500 yards away as the decommissioned Oriskany (CV-34), underwent final preparations for her scheduled sinking, while moored to the pier at Naval Air Station (NAS) Pensacola, Florida. Ex-Oriskany would be towed 22 miles south of Pensacola in approximately 212 feet of water where she would become the largest ship ever intentionally sunk as an artificial reef. After Oriskany reached the bottom, ownership of the vessel would transfer from the USN to the State of Florida.

U.S. Coast Guard photograph by PO1 Kyle Niemi, USCG (# 060515-G-3550N-005).

Robert M. Cieri
ex-CV-34 Oriskany
NS023473a
83k

The decommissioned aircraft carrier Oriskany (CV-34) is towed out to sea, 15 May 2006. Oriskany was scheduled to be scuttled on May 17th, 22 miles south of Pensacola in the Gulf of Mexico. The public would be allowed to fish and dive on the ship two days later. Known as the Big O, the 32,000-ton, 888-foot aircraft carrier was built at the New York Naval Shipyard and delivered to the Navy in 1950 where she later became a highly decorated veteran during conflicts in Korea and Vietnam. U.S. Navy photo by Journalist 1st Class Jackey Bratt (# 060515-N-4097B-012).

ex-CV-34 Oriskany
NS023445
105k

Gulf of Mexico, May 17, 2006 — Ex-Oriskany was sunk 24 miles off the coast of Pensacola, Fla., to form an artificial reef. The 888-foot ship took about 37 minutes to sink below the surface. After 25 years of service to the Navy in operations in Korea, Vietnam and the Mediterranean, ex-Oriskany now benefits marine life, sport fishing and recreation diving off the coast of the Florida panhandle. U.S. Navy photo by Photographer's Mate 2nd Class Jeffrey P. Kraus (# 060517-N-7992K-001).

USN

For more information about this ship, see:


View the Oriskany (CV-34 / CVA-34 /CV-34)
DANFS History entry located on the Naval Historical Center Web Site.

Crew Contact And Reunion Information

Contact Name: Mr. Lito Puglia
Address:1160 Hooksett Rd Hooksett, NH, 03106-10200
Phone: 603-626-4823
E-mail: b-bop2@juno.com

Additional Resources
Hazegray & Underway World Aircraft Carrier Pages By Andrew Toppan.
Official U.S. Navy Carrier Website
Korean Combat Action Reports located on the Naval Historical Center Web Site

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Last update: 17 February 2014