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USS McLANAHAN (DD-264)


Flag Hoist/Radio Call Sign - NIGK

CLASS - CLEMSON As Built.
Displacement 1,215 Tons, Dimensions, 314' 5" (oa) x 31' 8" x 9' 10" (Max)
Armament 4 x 4"/50, 1 x 3"/23AA, 12 x 21" tt..
Machinery, 26,500 SHP; Geared Turbines, 2 screws
Speed, 35 Knots, Crew 114
Operational and Building Data
Laid down by Bethlehem Shipbuilding, Squantum Ma. on April 20 1918.
Launched September 22 1918 and commissioned April 5 1919.
Decommissioned June 1922, Recommissioned December 18 1939.
Decommissioned October 9 1940.
To Britain October 9 1940, renamed HMS Bradford (H72).
Stricken January 8 1942.
Fate Broken up for Scrap in 1946.

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McLanahan 63kTenant McLanahan, born in Louisiana, was appointed midshipman 12 December 1839 and passed midshipman 2 July 1845. He served in Preble in the Mediterranean Squadron; in Delaware, Brandywine, and Macedonia in the Brazil, African, and East Indian Squadrons, 1840-45; and in Shark, Portsmouth and Cyane in the Pacific Squadron, 1846-48. While attached to the latter he was one of Lieutenant Heywood’s party beseiged by Mexican irregulars at San Jose, Baja California, 24 January to 14 February 1848. He conducted himself in a gallant, unflinching, and devoted manner, until he was killed by a rifle shot in the neck 11 February 1848. The photo is not Tenant McLanahan, it is a view of what a Midshipman's uniform looked like in 1847.Robert M. Cieri/Bill Gonyo
McLanahan 39kPhoto #: NH 77259, USS McLanahan (Destroyer # 264) tied up alongside USS Melville (Destroyer Tender # 2) at San Diego, California, 1919. The bow of USS Reno (DD-303) is visible in the right distance. Courtesy of Mrs. C.R. DeSpain, 1973. From the scrapbooks of Fred M. Butler. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Paul Rebold
McLanahan 123kU.S. Navy destroyers at San Diego, California, photographed circa 1919 or 1920 by the Bunnell Photo Shop and printed on "AZO" postal card stock. Ships present are (seen from astern, left to right): USS Laub (Destroyer # 263); unidentified; USS Edwards (Destroyer # 265); USS Ballard (Destroyer # 267); USS Shubrick (Destroyer # 268) and USS McLanahan (Destroyer # 264). The original card, which has neither stamp nor postmark, is inscribed : This is the way they anchor Destroyers, in the harbor. They have what they call a 'Mother ship' or supply ship and 6 or 8 destroyers all tied up close together". Courtesy of Jack Howland, 1982. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photo # NH 93975. Tony Cowart
McLanahan 126kPuget Sound Navy Yard, Bremerton, Washington Destroyers and other ships at the Navy Yard, 11 January 1922. Identifiable ships include (from front to rear): USS McLanahan (DD-264); USS Thompson (DD-305); USS Reno (DD-303); USS Kennedy (DD-306); USS New York (BB-34) and USS Texas (BB-35. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.Fred Weiss
Red Lead Row 195kRed Lead Row, San Diego Destroyer Base, California. Photographed at the end of 1922, with at least 65 destroyers tied up there. Ships present are identified as: (left to right, in the right diagonal row): Stansbury (DD-180); MacKenzie (DD-175); Renshaw (DD-176); Howard (DD-179); Gillis (DD-260); Tingey (DD-272); McLanahan (DD-264); Swasey (DD-273); Morris (DD-271); Bailey (DD-269); Tattnall (DD-125); Breese (DD-122); Radford (DD-120); Aaron Ward (DD-132) -- probably; Ramsey (DD-124); Montgomery (DD-121); and Lea (DD-118). (left to right, in the middle diagonal row): Wickes (DD-75); Thornton (DD-270); Meade (DD-274); Crane (DD-109); Evans (DD-78); McCawley (DD-276); Doyen (DD-280); Elliot (DD-146); Henshaw (DD-278); Moody (DD-277); Meyer (DD-279); Sinclair (DD-275); Turner (DD-259); Philip (DD-76); Hamilton (DD-141); Boggs (DD-136); Claxton (DD-140); Ward (DD-139); Hazelwood (DD-107) or Kilty (DD-137); Kennison (DD-138); Jacob Jones (DD-130); Aulick (DD-258); Babbitt (DD-128); Twiggs (DD-127); and Badger (DD-126). (left to right, in the left diagonal row): Shubrick (DD-268); Edwards (DD-265); Palmer (DD-161); Welles (DD-257); Mugford (DD-105); Upshur (DD-144); Greer (DD-145); Wasmuth (DD-338); Hogan (DD-178); O'Bannon (DD-177); and -- possibly -- Decatur (DD-341). (Nested alongside wharf in left center, left to right): Prairie (AD-5); Buffalo (AD-8); Trever (DD-339); and Perry (DD-340). Minesweepers just astern of this group are Partridge (AM-16) and Brant (AM-24). Nearest ship in the group of destroyers at far left is Dent (DD-116). The others with her are unidentified. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph. : NH 42539 Robert Hurst
McLanahan 123kPhotographed circa 1939-1940, probably in New York Harbor. Photo from the collection of the Vallejo Naval and Historical Museum.Darryl Baker/Robert Hurst
On British Service
HMS Bradford (ex-USS McLanahan, DD-264) Commissioned into RN on 8 October 1940, and briefly refitted at Devonport between 29 October and 12 November 1940. In consequence of defects arising during her working up period, she was selected for conversion to a long-range escort. The refit of considerable extent, was undertaken at Sheerness and, together with trials, associated defects and a collision, meant that she did not become operational with 43rd Escort Group on the UK/Gibraltar convoy route until September 1941, one year after transfer. It is apparent that, despite the long refit. all was not well with her as she returned to a repair yard on Humberside from June to August 1942. Even after that, she escorted only three convoys (one in the North Atlantic, KMS2 to Operation Torch, and a return convoy from that invasion of North Africa), during which she was in collision and went aground. In mid-December 1942 she went into dockyard hands, this time at Liverpool. By mid-1943 it had become apparent she was beyond economic repair, and she paid off into the control of Devonport Command, being towed away from Liverpool on 14 May 1943. On arrival at Devonport, she was commissioned on 1 June 1943 as HMS Foliot, an accommodation ship and accounting base for Combine Operations personnel, and she served as such for the rest of the war. She was handed over for scrapping on 19 June 1946, and arrived in tow at Troon on August 1946 for work to commence by the West of Scotland Shipbreaking Co.Ltd. (Foreign service history thanks to Robert Hurst)
McLanahan 71kThe 'Town' class destroyer HMS Bradford (ex-USS McLanahan, DD-264) dockside at Londonderry, Northern Ireland, after her conversion into a long range escort circa October 1941.Robert Hurst

USS McLANAHAN DD-264 History
View This Vessels DANFS History Entry
(Located On The hazegray Web Site, This Is The Main Archive For The DANFS Online Project.)

Commanding Officers
Thanks to Wolfgang Hechler & Ron Reeves

LCDR Reuben Burton Coffey    Apr 5 1919 - 1919
LCDR Forrest Close    Dec 18 1939 - Oct 8 1940

Additional Resources and Web Sites of Interest
Tin Can Sailors Website
Destroyer History Foundation
Destroyers Online Website
Official U.S.Navy Destroyer Website

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